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October 23, 1976 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1976-10-23

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Saturday, October 23, 1976

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY S

Put the DAILY
on Your Doorstep!

C/twPCA
I ___ ______

Court nominees battle over
WO'b4ipf ?en'iCe4 past rulings, court powers

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BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH
900 Plum-663-3800
Rev. John A. Woods, Pastor
Sunday Morning Services -
8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School-9:00 a.m.
Transportation available.

We're prepared to bring you the best in
news and sports - so subscribe now and
don't miss a single issue!
TO GET YOUR SUBSCRIPTION-STOP BY
420 MAYNARD OR CALL 764-0558

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
ST. MARY STUDENT
CHAPEL (CatholicY
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday, 5 p.m., 11:30 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m. - Classes for all
ages.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
5:00 p.m.-Co-op Supper.
6:00 p.m.-Informal Evening
Service.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 11:00 a.m.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith,
Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship' Service-10:30 a.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCHr
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and
'11:00.
Church School at 9:00 an
11:00.
A .4_. 'C-. : t...«. .a 1%

CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Churchf
1236 WashtenaV Ct.
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Welcome to 'all students!
10 a.m. - Morning Worship:
Father Geo. Simons will preach
the sermon.
11:30 a.m.-Lunch.
6:00 p.m. - Evening Service:
"The Presidency: Criteria for
Leadership from the Lord, Jes-
us Christ."
" God's people in God's world
for God's purpose.''
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF
CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M
Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday 9:30
a.m.; Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship -Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-
9928.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH ,
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Worship at 9:30 and 11:00 on
Sundays.
Student coffee hour at 12:00.
4:00 Sunday - Discussion of
Election Issues; dinner ($1.25)
at 6:00.
3:30 Tuesday - Paul Tillich
Seminar, second of six meet-
ings.
*$ * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Bible Study
dat 9:15 p.M.
d Midweek Worship Wednesday,
10 p.Mn.

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(Continued from Page 1) Ryan, the Republican incum-
that a charge cannot be in- bent, says: "it isn't the busi-
creased on appeal. ness of the judiciary to make
Only one of four men running laws ... Once in a while, the
for the eight-year seat, incum- courts forget that there is a
bent Chief Justice Thomas G. difference between judicial pow-
Kavanagh, defends the McMil- er and-judicial authority."
ler decision. Kavanaugh wrote Lawrence Lindemer, the Re-
the majority opinion in the case publican incumbent in the six-
four years ago. year race, echoes Ryan's sen-
His Republican opponent, Cir- timents, "I don't think the court
cuit Judge Joseph Swallow, as- should get into the province of
serts that the court reversed the legislative branch unless it
the decision unnecessarily "on is 'a matter restricted to court
a technicality," and that "Mc- procedure. Specifically, in Peo-
Miller today walks the streets ple v. Tanner the court adopted
as a free man. Vigilante jus- a rule as a matter of policy.
tice - people keeping guns and "Whether or not'is was justi-
vicious dogs, and citizen pro- fied. it shoinld have been left
tection - is a direct result of to the legislature," he conclud-
this type of decision," said ed.
Swallow. INDECISION on the court's
ROMAN GRIBBS, former De- part has been, a popular issue
troit mayor and Kavanagh's with the challengers in all three
other major opponent, agrees races. Kafman, citing an ex-
that the McMiller decision "en- ample, says:
conrages individuals to beat the "I'm the judge in Michigan
system to the detriment of so- who declared abortion unconsti-
cietv." t'itional. That was in October,
The other case (the Tanner 1972. While they (the State Su-
decision) has provided a con- preme Court) were sitting on
venient backdrop for candidates that, in January 1973 the U.S.
to talk about iidicial restraint, Supreme Court sent down a car-
particularly in the two-man bon copy of my decision. It was
race for the two-year term. still pending in the state Siu-
In the case where the court preme Court some few months
defined "indeterminate sentenc- later - even after that ruling."
ing" by setting the minimum Zolton Ferency, Human Rights
sentence as 2/3 of the maxi- Party nominee in the three-man
mum, Kaufman conplains, "This race for a six-year term and
is a restriction the Supreme outspoken civil rights leader,
Court gave to trial judges in declares, shaking his head: "On
sentencing. This is legislation." those civil rights cases, they
WITHOUT referring to the (the state Supreme Court) don't
case by name, Justice James know what they're doing."

Swalvclow

:

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Paid Political Advertisement
GEORGE
ST E
DEMOCRAT for
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY

As attorney'for the people, and their chief law enforce-*
nent official, the prosecuting attornev has a more direct
and significant impact on the daily lives of county resi-
dents, on campus and off, than any other official to be
elected November 2nd.
The prosecuting attornev can concentrate limited criminal
justice resources in such critical areas as rape, robbery,
consumer fraud and environmentalrabuse: or, like the
incumbent, he can waste these resources pursuing victim-
less offenses. The prosecuting attorney can see that tenants
are protected from unsafe housina, that nursing home
patients are protected from physical and fiscal abuse, and
that the whole community is protected from collusive price-
fixing that artificially inflates prices for groceries and
other merchandise: or, like the incumbent, 'he can ignore
these problems. The prosecuting attorney can bring the
concept of equal justice closer to reality; or, like the in-
cumbent, he can continue with a system of double stand-
ards, one for the privileged few and another for the rest
of us. An energetic, committed prosecuting attorney can
have a positive impact on our lives.
George Steeh, a native of Washtenaw County, earned his
bachelor's and law degrees from the University of Michigan.
He had experience in the best pros--l-or's office in the
state, where he was a Senior Assiston' Prosecuting Attor-
ney. He has been chief of a nationally acclaimed Economic
Crime Unit. Steeh has extensive experience with both civil
and criminal trials and appeals. He has proven ability in
effectively managing a staff and- case load ,more than
twice as large as the Washtenaw County prosecutor's
Steeh is a nationally recognized leader inudeveloping inno-
vative, effective approaches to confront the crime problem.
In the prosecuting attorney's office, we need dynamic
leadership, effective management and fair treatment of
all citizens. George Steen has the energy, concern and
ability to do the job for us.
Paid for by Steeh for Prosecuting Attorney

Moody

Arizona atty. general seizes
Bolles prosecutioni's files

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THIS SPAE CON~TM3UTED BY THE~ PUBISHER

Adult Enrichment at 10:00. jPONX rz W?- h
W.TFIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP) - The
WESLEY FOUNDATION SCIENTIST Maricopa county prosecutor,
UNITED METHODIST 1833 Washtenaw I ousted from the Don Bolles
CAMPUS MINISTRY Sunday Services and Sunday murder trial by Arizona's gov-
W. Thomas Schomaker, School-10:30 a.m. ernor, said he discovered his
Chaplain/Director Wednesday Testimony Meet- files on the case missing yester-
10 a.m.-Morning Worship. ing-8:00 p.m. day morning, carted out by po-
5:30 p.m. - Celebration/Fel- Child Care Sunday-under 2 licemen hours after a mistrial,
lowship. years. was declared.
6:15 p.m.-Shared Meal, 75c. Midweek Informal Worship. Later, the state attorney gen-
Extensive programming for Reading Room-306 E. Liber- eral said his office had taken!
undergrads and grad students. ty, 10 - 5 Monday - Saturday; the files. The action intensified
Stop in or call 668-6881 for in- closed Sundays. a feud between state and coun-;
formation. * * * ty authorities on the handling of
* AMERICAN BAPTIST the investigative reporter's1
UNIVERSITY CHURCH CAMPUS CENTER murder.
OF CHRIST 502 E. Huron-663-9376 "ALL OF OUR files were
Presently Meeting at the Ronald E. Carey, taken out last night after most
Ann Arbor Y, 530 S. Fifth Campus Minister of us had left," said County
David Graf, Minister Sunday Morning Worship-10 Atty. Donald Harris.
Students Welcome. a.m. First Baptist Church. "Several plainclothes police
For information or transpor- Bible Study-11 a.m. officers came in with a dolly
tation: 663-3233 or 426-3808. Fellowship Meeting Tuesday and carted off the filing cabi-
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. | at 7:30 p.m. net. I didn't know about it un-
_...''til this morning."
Harris said the removal of
T r I a f r c ofiles would "seriously hamper''
his probe of more suspects in
the Bolles murder.
-MCAT *LSAT -DAT JOHN A DAMSON,
" GMAT " CPAT " VAT * GRE * OCAT " SAT a 32 - year - old greyhound dog
" N TINA. ED &DENT. BOARDS !Breeder, is charged with the
NATIONAL MED. & Dmurder. But Harris has said
.ECFMG " FLEX others might be indicted, and
Flexible Programs and Hours he stuck by that statement yes-
Over 38 years of experience and success. Small classes. Voluminous terday.
home study materials. Courses that are constantly updated. Centers "It seems to me everybody is
open days and weekends all year. Complete tape facilities for review stopping with Adamson," he
of class lessons and for use of supplementary materials. Make-ups for said. I want the others. We have
missed lessons at our centers. a known quantity, and he's
Write or call:4 awaiting trial. I want to get
1945 Pauline Blvd. N ontothe other people."
Ann Arbor 48103 TEST PREPARATON Harris' comments on possi-
E4S PEAAIN1ble indictments were blamed by
662-3149 SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938 Iboth the defense and prosecu-1
Call Toll Free (outside N.Y. State) 800 - 221-9840 tion when they asked for a mis-
For trial Thursday. Both sides in-
Affiliated Centers in Major U. S. CitiesiT f sisted he prejudiced the trial. .

personally don't see how _the
involvement of others affects!
the current trial."
IT WAS LEARNED that Har-
ris and the attorney general'st
snecial prosecutor, William
Shafer, hdd been feuding for
months over the notorious mur-
der case.

HARRIS, TOLD that Shafer
had the files, said, "He could
'have at least had the courtesy
to tell me he was taking them."
The 38-year-old Harris, who
took over as interim county at-
torney when the previous man
resigned last August, said his

BUT SOME SOURCES close mentioned in the stories about
to the case pointed out that the the matters he was investigat-
flap over Harris' press inter- ing. As a result, some politi-
views gave officials a reason cia-s here felt that holding the
to remove him, and that it came trial now could affect local
after a long power struggle with elections.
the attorney general's office' AFTER THE MISTRIAL, the
Going along with the request judge ordered that a new trial,
of both defense and prosecu- begin before Dec. 20.
tion, Superior Court Judge Fred- Informed yesterday that Har-
eric Heineman aborted the trial ris' files on the Belles case
in its fourth day Thursday. He were missing, Babbit said, "The
added a statement, however, files are now in Mr. Shafer's
that he did not find Harris session . . . These files are
guilty of any impropriety. Rath- subje ct to Mr. Schafer's direc-
er, he blamed the publicity in tion. He asked the police de-
general. partnent to pick them up."
Harris, calling himself "fris-
trtd...use"b h le Shafer, contacted by phone,
trated . .upset , by the a e said, "We need the files to work
n ations against him, said, I ;ntecs.
------11- . -9 -- i -, I on the case."

UNITED STATES READING LAB
OFFERS SPEED READING COURSE
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

United States Reading Lab will
offer a 4 week course in speed
reading to a limited number of
qualified people at U-M..
This recently developed method
of instruction is the most innovative
and effective program available in
the United States.
Not only does this fdnmous course
reduce your timein the classroom to
just one class per week for 4 short
weeks but it also includes an ad-
vanced speed reading course on
cassette tape so that you can con-
tinue to improve for the rest of your
life. In just 4 weeks the average
student should be reading 4-5 times
faster. In a few months some stu-
dents are r e a d i n g 20-30 times
faster attaining s p e e d s that ap-
proach 6000 words per minute. In
rare instances s p e e d s of up to
13,000 wpm have been documented.
Ouraverage graduate student
should read 7-10 times faster upon
completion of the c o u r s e with
marked improvement in comprehen-
sion and concentration.
For those who would like addi-
tional information, a series of free,
one hour, orientation lectures have
been scheduled. At these free lec-
tures the course will be explained
in complete detail, including class-
room procedures, instruction meth-
ods, class schedule and a special I
time only introductory tuition that
is less than one-half the cost of
similar courses. You m u s t attend
any of the free meetings for infor-
motion about U-M classes.

4 short weeks you can read 7 to 10
times f a s t e r, concentrate better
and comprehend more.
If you are a 'student who would
like to make A's instead of B's or
C's or if you are a business person
who wants to stay a b r e a s t of
today's everchanging accelerating
world then this course is an abso-
lute necessity.
These free special one-hour lec-
tures will be held at the following
times and places.

A bitter exchange between embroilment in the Bolles case
the two earlier this week pre- ehas soured him on public of-
ceded Goy. TRaul Castro's rn- fice.
usual order placing the case in "I don't ever want to be in
state hands. one source close to public life again," said Har-
the case said. ris. "I'm going back to my
According to the source, Atty. law practice."
Gen. Bruce Babbit said in a Asked if he would resign be-
letter to the governor Thnrs- fore his term ends, Harris said
dav: "As a result of Mr. Shaf- fore his ways"
I er's discussions with the county firml-y:"No
I attorney, I am now convinced
that irreparable damage may .
he calsed unless Mr. Harrisi O U R
is removedf matters immediatal
and without prior notice to Mr.
THE GOVERNOR, did so
The mnrder of Bolles has at- -
tra'~ed more local and national e
headlines than any case in st d e
Phoenix history. The 47-vear-
old reporter was maimed Jiine
2 when dynamite{ exploded tin-' (Continued from Page l)
Jer his car. He died 11 days for analysis in March, with the
later. final results being released
Bolles was considered a cru- some time next summer. Al-
sader who exposed land fraud though the findings will be used
and misdeeds of politicians. The primarily for scholarly re-
story he was working on when search and 'classroom teaching,
he was killed involved an al- Miller said political parties and
leged land fraud and, since he candidates themselves may
was killed, the names of some 'iltili'e the results for their own
local political figures have been 1nurposes.
one 121

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NAME THIS ELEPHANT

U-M MEETINGS
Wednesday, October
6:30 and 8:30

20

Thursday, October 21
6:30 and 8:30
Friday, October 22
7:30
TWO FINAL MEETINGS
Sunday, October 24
2:30 and 7:30

A new feature of
Q; i
to be coming soon-
FAT FIGHTERS'
FORUM
But first we need a
name for our elephant!!
The person with the winning
entry will receive 2 passes to
a local movie of his or her
choice.

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HALLOWEEN MAKE-UP

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Featuring full lines of Theatrica
Make-up by Stein-Mehron.
We carry all you'll need: clown white, grease paint,
glitter, rouges, colored hair spray, and much more.
Lucky Drugs, Inc.
665-8693
213 S. MAIN
that's on Main betwee4 Liberty and Washington
OPEN TILL 6 P.M. MON.-SAT.

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Monday, October
6:30 and 8:30

25

THESE MEETINGS WILL
BE HELD AT
ANN ARBOR INN
100 SOUTH FOURTH AVE.
If you are a businessman, stu-
dent, housewife or executive this
course, which took 5 years of in-
tensive research to develop, is a
must. You can read 7-10 times

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Thanks to All Who
Kickoff Happy - Hot
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SEND OR BRING YOUR SUGGESTIONS'

TO: TH"'"inm I Smi ELEPHAiNT""nin"'i
. NAME THIS ELEPHANT |

Made Our
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FAT FIGHTERS' FORUM

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