100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1976 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-... ~wki~ .. e. .0 .. -"-' I7 ~ dl~ \ R

NFINEPPRFEMM

vveuIInI.Ja-y, pte1uILts..I r a, ' -

II IL IYit%-l i/d3I\1V Ll"%$&-I

r uy+G I°i rz

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Wednesday, September 15, 1976
DAY CALENDAR

William Zimmerman, "An Intro. to
the Ctr., for Russian & E. European
Studies," Commons rm., Lane Hall,
noon.
Commission for Women Returning
Students Committee: re-organiza-
tion meeting; 3205 Union, noon.
Campus Editors, Publishers: "Copy-
right issues & Cataloguing-in-Pub-
lication," 3206 Schl. of Pub. Health,
1 p.m.
Int'l, Ctr.: "Scholarship Opportu-
nit for Study Abroad." Int'l. Ctr.,
603 E. Madison, 3 p.m.

01 4$IUMKUN L
-PLUS-
STUDENT NIGHT
50c Admission with Student I.D.
COMING SEPT. 20 & 21
SONICS RENDEZVOUS
HOURS: Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.-2a,m.
WEEKLY HOURS:9p.m.-2a.m.
r i 516 E. LIBERTY 994-5350

Engineering Council: 3201 E. Eng,,
Cont. Med. Educat.: Otorhinol- 7 p.m.
aryngolic problems in family prac-
tice; Towsley Ctr, 8 a.m. Computing Ctr.: films: "Basic Use
of the IBM 029 Keypunch, "Ad-'
WUOM: 'America and& Russia,' vanced Use of the 029 IBM Key-
live coverage of discussion, Marilyn punch," 1024 E. Eng., continuously
Berger (NBC News) moderator, 10:30 7-10 p.m.; "Use of Teletype in MTS,"
a.m. 1500 E. Eng., continuously 7-10 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Info. Ctr.: "Open Computing Ctr.: Brice Carnahan,'
Hearth Series," Beth Fitts, "Dance "An Introduction to Digital Compu-
Craft," Union, 2nd fl., noon. ters & Computing Languages," Nat.
Sci. Aud., Kraus, 7:30 p.m.
Ctr. Russian, E. European Studies: I

AP Photo

On the right track
Workers attach the cowcatcher to one of four trolley cars in Detroit yesterday prior to a test run on the three-quar-
ter nmile long line running from Grand Circus Park to Cow )Hall. The inaugural run and dedication ceremonies for
the trolley service are slated for noon Monday

Federal programs
offer financial aid
By The Associated Press The supplemental grants are
Back to school can bring budg- for students of exceptional fi-
et blues to college students and nancial need who would not be
their families these days, with able to finish their education
costs soaring to record levels., without the extra money. The
But a number of government program is limited to undergrad-
programs are available to ease uates; graduate students are not
the bite. eligible. The grants range fromI
The College Entrance Ex- $200 to $1,500 a year, with a!
amination Board says that the maximum of $4,000 over four
average student at a four-year years and $5,000 over five
college, living on campus, will years.
have to spend $4,568 this year. THE NATIONAL direct stu-
That's 6 per cent more than it dent loan program enables stu-!
cost last year and 54 per cent dents to borrow up to $2,500
more than it cost in 1970. if they are enrolled in a voca-
BOTH THE Republicans and tional pr.ogram or have finishedI
the Democrats in this election less than two years of a pro-
year have urged increased fed- gram 1 -ing to a bachelor's
eral support of higher educa- degrc 'dents who have com-1
tion. pleted ; years toward a bach-
President Ford says his poli- elor's degree can borrow up to
:y is guided by two basic prin- $5,000 and graduate students
ciples: can apply for up to $10,000.
"First, no student should be The guaranteed loan program;
denied access to a post-secon- enables the student to borrow
dary education because of fi- directly from a bank, credit
nancial barriers. ... Second, in union, etc. who is willing to
most cases, aid should be pro- make an educational loan. It
vided to individuals rather than is guaranteed by a state or
to institutions." private nonprofit agency or in-
THE DEMOCRATIC platform sured by theafederal govern-
calls for "a coordinated and ment. The maximum loan is
reliable system of grants, loans $2,500 a year, or $7,500 total
and work study." It also says for undergraduate or vocation-
the federal government "should al study. The ceiling on interest
directly provide cost-of-educa- is 7 per cent.
tion payments to all higher edu- The work-study program pro-
cation institutions ... to help vides jobs for students who have
cover per-student costs, which great financial need and must
far exceed those covered by tu- earn part of their expenses. To
ition and fees." qualify, a student must be en-
The U.S. Office of Education rolled at least half time as a
supports five programs of stu- graduate, undergraduate or vo-
dent assistance: basic educa- cational student at an approved,
postsecondary institution.
tional opportunity grants, sup- -----r-sito
plemental educational opportu- _
nity grants, college work-study, NO MORE VIETNAMS!
national direct student loans and

..... .

.

Mixed Bowling Leagues
now forming-sign up now
Michigan Union Lanes
OPEN Mon.-Thurs. 1 1 a.m.-1 2 mid.
Fri. and Sat. 1 1 a.m.-1 a.m.
Sundays 1 p.m.-12 mid.

j Psychiatry: Roy R. Grinker, (prof.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY of psych. Univ. of Chicago) "The
'What' of Schizophrenia," CPHI And. C0 0c
Volume LXXXVII, No. 6 9:30 p.m
Wednesday, September 15, 1976
is edited and managed by students{
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i I y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. - OETO TE C
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.0 1E
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Deparimen of Psychology
-Experiential learning in over 40 different set-
Crab licetinfest tings - penal facilities, mental institutions,
eeteple hospitals, community services schools half-
nicest peoplehos ,
way houses, homes, etc.
II I KILLS
If interested: COME TO
OUTREACH MASS MEETING
ON CONKTACT WED., SEPT. 15, 7:30 .m.
" Special comb
inclded.HILL AUDITORIUM
SWithout ay
prescription
at Drug Stores Questions? Registration Information and Procedures?
COME TO Corner House (Introductory Psychology Building)
554 Thompson Street (Corner of Thompson and Madison)
or call 764-9279, 764-9179
HELP OTHERS TO HELP THEMSELVES
Psychology 201

guaranteed student loans.
THE AMOUNT OF money
available to an individual gen-
erally is determined on the
basis of financial need and aca-
demic eligibility. Information onI
the programs is usually avail-
able through a school financial
aid officer.
In order to qualify for a basic
grant, a student must be attend-
ing an approved institution: a
four-year college, a community
or junior college, a vocational
school, a technical institute or]
a hospital school of nursing.
The student must be enrolled]
on at least a half-time basis in]
a program of study which lasts
for six months or longer. Stu-
dents can file an application to
find out whether they qualify
for a basic grant as soon as
they are accepted for enroll-
ment; the sooner the better.
Once notified of eligibility, the
student must submit the notice4
to the school, which will then
determine the amount of the
award.3

-in South Africa
-in Latin America
--in Middle East
The b e s t way to pre-
vent f u t u r e criimnal
interventions is to force
our govt. to give
FULL
AMNESTY
TO RESISTORS
AND VICTIMS.
DEMONSTRATE
TODAY
5 p.m., Crisler Arena
SOUTH ENTRANCE
Pal. Adv., Paid for by
Veterans for Peace
542 S. Dearborn, Chicago, 1ll.

I~OU~I
tc epi~c.oL , 5tkdett fondon4
218 ur. diviSlol
ut arbor, nkihar t18108 - tdephore 665-0606
A CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY SPIRITUAL EXPRES-
SION & INQUIRY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SPONSORING IN THE FALL TERM, 1976, MAJOR PRO-
GRAMS IN THESE AREAS:
EPISCOPAL CAMPUS MINISTRY
This year Canterbury House is committed to working
with students and other people in the, University who
are interested in new approaches to Christian liturgy.
Individual counseling on personal and spiritual matters
is available by arrangement with the Chaplain.
IMAGES OF THE HOLY
Occasional events designed to give a musical, artistic or
dramatic voice to the spirit. In September, outdoor
music on the Diag. In November, a three week residency
at Canterbury House of Ken Feit, Itinerant Fool, with a
full program of performances, discussions and classes in
the tradition and craft of the fool.
C. G. JUNG SEMINAR
An on-going study group meeting every Wednesday
evening through the term. A six session course in Basic
Principles of Jung's Analytical Psychology will alter-
nate with evenings of film, speakers, and artistic ex-
pression designed to amplify our understanding of the
human psyche.
NATURAL HEALING
Friday evening discussions on health and healing energy
with invited guests presenting a different topic each
S week.
LAST LECTURES
A group of Michigan professors have been asked to pre-
pare a lecture as if it were the last lecture they would
ever give-in the hope they will talk about the things
most important to them. The hour long "last lectures"
are scheduled on campus
GAYNESS AND SPIRITUALITY
Gay people with various approaches to spirituality
gather each Sunday in the Gayness and Spirituality
group. Canterbury House also participates in efforts to
ascertain and improve the rights of gay people at the
University of Michigan.
PAUL GOODMAN STUDY GROUP
Tuesday evening discussions on the thought of educa-
tional and social philosopher, Paul Goodman, and its
current implications.
MORE IDEAS ARE WELCOME
Canterbury House will sponsor additional programs as
ideas and issues emerge during the year. Your ideas
are, welcome at any time for programs which address
the spiritual and ethical needs of people at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. Limited funding is available.

i
i

o2°

on a:uI

SAVNS

from

'Parker Pens

r Gua

CELLAR
PRICE

149
0 e

visit the U Cellar COURSE
BOOKS Headquarters-
upstairs in the Michigan
Union Ballroom-
Mon. Sept. 13 thru
Fri. Sept. 17 1:00-5:00
and meet the PARKER
Representative here to
demonstrate our entire
line of practical and
personal PARKER PENS.
Great Selection!!
AND at50 %OFF
all regular list prices!

MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
CONCERT SERIES
USHnERS
NEW USHERS-Anyone who ushered on a part-time basis
or has never ushered but would like to, come to the meet-
ing at 5:00 p.m. THURSDAY, SEPT. 16.
VETERAN USHERS-Anyone who was a permanent usher
or Security team, come to an organizational meeting at
5:00 p.m. TUESDAY, SEPT. 14. No new ushers will be
signed up at this meeting.

l o ' ' 4 : G 3

CELLAR
PRICE

$1.29

Just a sample, gang....... Stop in and see!

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan