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April 14, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-14

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Page Two

tHE ICHIGAN DAILY

( hursdgy, April 14' 19 77

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Ihursday, April 14, 19!!

writer/producer/dirctbr RobertAltman

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Babies
(Continued from Page 1)
are abnormal. Oxygen tubes'
hang from the ceilings of the
nurseries, and oxygen can be in-
fused directly into the incuba-
tor or into a plastic bubble
placed over the baby's head.
Because of all the medical
equipment, the Issels "really
couldn't see much of David"
when they first went to visit
him at Holden, Barbara Issel
says. David's eyes were hidden
by tape to protect against the
special light used to treat his
liver problem, and much of his
tiny chest was covered by the
sensors for the monitors. A mass

get sec
of feeding and respirator tubes,
plus wires leading to various
machines, made David "look
like spaghetti," his father re-
calls.
At birth, his father notes,
David "looked like a hump of
modeling clay-it was that color
of gray. He was obviously right
on the edge of expiring."
MOST OF the medical instru-
ments used in the Holden nur-
sery are also used on adult pa-
tients elsewhere in the medical
center, "but not to the same
extent as here," says Thomas
Martin, a fourth-year medical

ond chance at Holden

keS~it Ped

student who has worked at
Holden.
One piece of equipment that
was designed specifically for
newborns is Holden's special
ambulance. The vehicle is equip-
ped with a portable incubator,'
similar to the ones in the nur-
sery, but with its own oxygen
and power supplies.
Staffed with a pediatrician,
registered nurse and respiratory
therapist, the ambulance trans-,
ports critically ill newborns to
Holden from community hospi-
tals within a 100-mile radius of
Ann Arbor.
THE STAFF members at Hol-
den are specially trained to work
with newborns. Two neonatolo-
gists-pediatricians with a spe-
cialty in treating newborns-di-
rect the care of the infants. The
nurses, other doctors, and res-

piratory. therapists also have
special training or experience in
neonatology.,
"We were tremendously im-
pressed by the nurses-by the
entire staff," Barbara says.
"The devotion they put into the
job was outstanding."
The Holden staff encourages
parents to interact as much as
possible with their babies-which
represents a profound "change
in attitude" that has occurred
in recent years, says neonatolo-
gist Dietrich Roloff.
"IT USED to be that we would
take the baby away and tell the
parents, 'Come back in four
weeks,' " Dr. Roloff says. Now
the Holden staff encourages
parents to visit their baby any
time of day or night, and if the
visits become less frequent-a
sign that the parents are be-

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1 woman became 2

2

women became

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Free admission with Free admission with
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Appearing Thru Saturday:
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3 women became 1.
QIdley c)urai/

coming detached from their
child-a social worker contacts
the family and tries to remedy
the situation.
"We explain to the parents
that they can't be feeding the
baby or changing diapers or
holding him because the baby's
too sick," Lanese says. "But we
encourage the parents to touch
the babies, to make eye contact,
to talk to them."
The Issels were allowed to
take photographs of David and
place toys in his incubator, but
they were not able to pick him
up or feed him.
"YOU KNOW, a bottle is
something you take for granted
with a baby, but David wa* be-
ing fed through a tube," Bar-
bara says. "The doctors were
taking out the IV (intravenous)
tube one time when I Was visit-
ing, so I got to hold David then.
That was when he was about two
weeks old-I didn't hold him
again for about four or five
months."
The specialized treatment now
available for critically ill new-
borns such as David has greatly
increased their chances for sur-
vival. Of the 500 infants treated
at Holden last year, 86 per cent
survived.
"We know we can make these
babies live," Lanese says. 'We
can make them grow and get
fat."
Join'The
Dfaily

"\ - .. .. v.. 1. i .rte r.. .. .a _ __. _.

- - w W - - - w W W

GEORGE CUKOR DOUBLE FEATURE
BORN YESTERDAY
(AT 7:00)
In an Academy Award winning performance,
Judy Holliday plays a former chorus girl mis-
tress of Broderick Crawford who is taught to be
a lkd yby William Holden. Fine poiltical-sexual
comedy. 4
IT SHOULD HAPPEN TO YOU
(AT 9:05)
An actress (Holliday again) buys space on a
billboard to gain attention but loses her boy-
friend (Jack Lemmon) in the process.
CINEMA GUILD BOTH SHOWS OLD ARCH. AUD

r.

.11

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