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April 14, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-14

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Thursday, April 14, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Tlhree

Thursday, April 14, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY DIGEST APRIL 14,1977

From Wire Service Reports
International
Dissidents
nabbed
BERLIN - An East German
dissident who wrote to President
Carter and a Romanian novelist
who demanded a human rights
investigation were reported un-
der arrest yesterday. Eight oth-
er Romanian dissidents were re-
ported sent to work camps.
A spokesman for the East Ger-
man Society for Human Rights
said in West Berlin that Hell-
muth Nitsche and his wife Ur-
sula were arrested in East Ber-
lin a week ago.
IN A LETTER made public
by the West German group,
Nitsche wrote Carter, "Even
though our prospects for escap-
ing this Communist regime
alive are few, may you be as-
sured that ... our political re-
sponsibility and conscience nev-
er can be silenced."
Nitsche claimed he had lost
his post as professor at East
Berlin's Humboldt University
six years ago after making po-
litically critical statements. He
said he and his wife both lost
lesser teaching jobs after apply-
ing to resettle in the West. .
In Paris, the Frence Commit-
tee for the Defense of Freedom
in Romania said Romanian dis-
sident Paul Goma had been ar-
rested in Bucharest and eight
other dissidents had been sent
to Romanian work camps for a
year.
THE GROUP said Goma, a,
novelist and author of an open
letter asking for an investigation
of alleged human rights viola-
tions in Romania,. was arrested
April 3 or 4. The group said
there had been no word on his
whereabouts since the arrest.
The committee said the eight
other signers of Goma's letter
had to enlist for "voluntary
work assignments" in labor
camps. The committee said the
location of the camps was not
known.
The reports came as former
Yugoslav Vice President Milo-
van Djilas claimed in an arti-
cle appearing in Rome that East
European Communist nations
were no longer able to extin-
guish internal opposition basedJ
on discontent.
Communism
accepted
MADRID - The Spanish army
announced yesterday it acceptsI
the post-Franco government's

Cheap foreign
Sgoodsf
NEW YORK - --Tenskofrthou-
sands of garment workers left
their jobs coast to coast yes-
terday to demonstrate against
inexpensive imported products
made by low-paid foreign work-
ers.
Officials of the American
workers' unions claim the coun-
try is being flooded with cheap
imports at the cost to their
industry of hundreds of thou-
sands of jobs.
"AMERICA HASbe-
come a dumping ground for all
foreign countries," Jack Di-
A Blasi of the Amalgamated
Clothing and Textile Workers,
told an estimated 10,000 gar-
ment workers who rallied in
~ New York's Herald Square in
near 90-degree temperatures.
"We cannot compete with
Taiwan and Japan," DiBlasi
declared. "They only get 10 to
15 cents an hour. We can't live
on that. It's got to stop or we'll
all be on welfare."
Glothing union leaders and
AFL-CIO President George
Meany met with President Car-
ter yesterday to pass on the
AP Photo same message

of cities losing population in1
1970-75.
Whil Dallas and Fort Worth
showed population declines, the
suburbs of Garland and Arling-
ton each grew by more than 20
per cent into cities of more
than 100,000 persons.
State

lice files.
The Red Squad, a unit of the
State Police, had for more than
20 years probed suspected sub-
versives and subversive groups
and kept the data on file in
special dossiers.
ON THE request of the HRP,
an Ingham County judge last
year ruled the activity uncon-
stitutional and ordered the
squad disbanded. However, on-
ly a few Red Squad targets
have been able to see their files

MEDIATRICS presents
THE ORIGINAL
KINmG KONG
FRIDAY, APRIL 15-7:30 & 9:30
MLB-3

i
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I
t

Red Squad

i
f

and what kind of information
was collected about them.
There is evidence that Red
Squad kept information on
harmless political activities and
that files were leaked to other
agencies and some private
companies.
"Until last week, Gov.
William Milliken had not
indicated his willingness to al-
low those who were the sub-
jects of Red Squad surveillance
to have the opportunity to in-
spect their files prior to the de-
struction of the files," Ferency
said yesterday.
Ferency added that Milliken
indicated last week he favors
the release of personal files to
those who have been investigat-
ed. This leaves Attorney Gener-
al Kelley as the only state of-
ficial still resisting full public
disclosure of their files.
I-.r

decision to legalize the Spanish
Communist party. The action
appeared to end a spate of dissi-
dence within the armed forces
that began with the resignation
Tuesday of the head of the Span-
ish navy.
The army's stand was consid-
ered a victory for King Juan
Carlos and Premier Adolfo Sua-
rez, who backed legalization of'
the Communist party as part
of their drive to liberalize Span-
ish government. Their policy
brought out the first military
dissent since the death of right-
ist dictator Gen. Francisco
Franco 17 months ago.
THE SUPERIOR Council of
the army said it accepted the
government's decision on the
Communists "for patriotic rea-
sons" although it viewed the
move with "skeptical eyes."
The newly legalized party an-
nounced it was cancelling all
public events, including a big
rally scheduled for Sunday, for
reasons of "political prudence,"
apparently to avoid stirring
further opposition as dissent
continued to bubble within the
navy. Following the resignation
of Adm. Gabriel Pita da Veiga,
a long-time Franco follower, an-
other admiral, Enrique Amador
Franco, head of the merchant
marine, quit yesterday in pro-
test over the Communist issue.
Government officials credited

Lt. Gen. Manuel Gutierrez Mel- boom cities of the post World
lado, deputy premier in charge War II era. Atlanta, Dallas,
of national defense, with heading IFort Worth, Seattle, Portland,
off much of the military dissent. and Denver were all on the list I
AT -." ' Ii

FerencyC
LANSING - Zolton Ferency,
attorney for the ultraliberal
Human Rights Party, says At-
torney General Frank Kelleyis
the only obstacle standing be-
tween "red squad" targets and
access to their secret State Po-

,I

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IN ational

Population'
E shifting
WASHINGTON - The only,
major American cities gaining'I.
populuation are located in the
South and -West, the Census Bu-
reau reported yesterday.
Five of the nation's 10 largest
cities are now located in the
Southwest, due partly to a mi-;
gration from the older, declin-
ing cities of the Northeast and
Northwest, the bureau said.
THE BUREAU'S 1975 esti-
mates of population show that
of the 20 largest cities in the
country, only six have grown
in population since 1970. Theyf
are Houston, San Diego, Sani
Antonio, Honolulu, Phoenix and
Memphis.
Populations dropped signifi-
cantly from 1970 to 1975 in St.
Louis, with a drop of 15.6 per,
cent; Cleveland, 14.9 per cent;
Minneapolis, 12.9 per cent; Buf-
falo, 12 per cent; Pittsburgh,
11.8 per cent; Detroit, 11.8 per
cent; Newark, N. J., 11 per
cent, and Cincinnati, 9 per cent.
New York, the nation's larg-
est city, declined in population
by 5.2 per cent. Its estimated
1975 population was 7,481,613
residents. Chicago fell 8 per
cent in the five-year period but
remained the second largest
city with 3,099,391 residents.
Third ranked Los Angeles de-
clined in population by 3 per
cent to 2,727,399.
P 0 P U L A T I O N losses
have also struck some of the,

ALL YOU CAN EAT
Thursday Special 5 to 10 P.M.
French Fried Smelt
DINNER INCLUDES:
" French Fried Smelt
" French Fried Potatoes
" Large Pretzel Bell Salad with Choice of Dressing
" Steaming Hot Basket of Russian Rye Bread

I
I

TONIGHT AT 7:00 & 9 05
= THE
HAS LANDED

r
SATURDAY, APRIL 16
SPECIAL MATINEES: 1:00 and 4:00 only $1.00
9:15 p.m. $1.50 and
SPECIAL MIDNIGHT SHOW only $1.00
Aud. A Angell Hall
In STEREOPHONIC SOUND
ANN AUI IM IiAI -Cc-c0
Tonight in Auditorium A of Angell Hall
OBSESSION
(Brian de Palma, 1976) 7, 8:45 & 10:30-AUD. A
This romantic suspense drama begins with the mysterious kid-
napping of a young business executive's wife 'and daughter. Fifteen
years later, an astounding incident leads him to search back into
the bizarre past and discover the terrifying truth about the crime.
Filmed entirely on location in Florence and New Orleans, OBSES-
SION combines the talents of De Palma (CARRIE), Paul Schrader
(who also scripted TAXI-DRIVER), and Bernard Herrman.
"Exquisite entertainment."-Richard Schickel. Cliff Robertson,
Genevieve Bujold.
Showtimes are 7, 8:45 & 10:30
Admission $1,25
Friday, April 15 in MLB-
Samuel Fuller Night
"SHOCK CORRIDOR" and
"THE NAKED KISS"
Saturday, April 16 in MLB-
"MODERN TIMES" and
"HAROLD AND MAUDE"
The Ann Arbor Film Co-operative is lookinq for new members.
Stop by one of our showinqs and puck up an application.
DEADLINE FRIDAY, APRIL 15th.

I FM

$3.95 ADULTS

CHILDREN Under 12-$1.75

Friday and Saturday Night
Live Bluegrass Featuring:
THE R.F.D. BOYS
The Pretzel Bellf
Restaurant
SERVING DINNER 5 TO 10 P.M.

120 E. LIBERTY

761-1470

TONIGHT AT 7:00 & 9:05.
TONIGHT AT 8:00 ONLY
i 2
ACADEMY AWARDSj
"BOUND FOR GLARY"
(PG)

E

I H

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
r; ' r+} ' ..' y''r'R -rp,"rzp{r".i r ?; . .vr.""r ?:af:::"?f:?}"?:"Y"::?:.sr m:: "rn

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Thursday, April 14, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
wUOM: Futurologist, Gregory Bate-
son, "Direction In Determinism and
Change," sponsored by University
Activities Center, 10:05 a.m.
Physics/Astronomy: L. F. Li, U.
of Pittsburgh, 2038 Randall Lab., 4
P.m.
Guild House: Poetry Reading, Step-
hen Dunning, reading from his
works, 802 Monroe, 7:30 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICE
STUDENT ACCOUNTS: Your at-
tention is called to the following
rules passed by the Regents at their
meeting on February 28, 1936: "Stu-
dents shall pay all accounts due the
University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or
summer session. Student loans which
are not paid or renewed are sub-
ject to this regulation; however,

student loans not yet due are'
exempt. Any unpaid accounts at the
close of business on the last day
of classes will be reported to the
Cashier of the University and "(a)
All academic credits will be with-
held, the grades for the semester
or summer session just completed
will not be released, and no tran-
script of credits will be issued. "(b)
All students owing such accounts
will not be allowed to register in
any subsequent semester or summer
session until payment has been
made."
THE MICllGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 155
Thursday, April 14, 1977
is edited and managed by students'
Eat the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 42G Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48149.' Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday. morning.
Gubscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

the PROFESSIONAL THEATREPG
in the POWER CENTER for the performing arts
TAMBOURINES
A AA C5(\
April3-17 f,
8:00pm
April 17
2:00pm
Don't Forget!
WILLIAM WINDOM
Thurber II
April 18, 8:00p.m. -

I

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CAMP SOMERSET FOR GIRLS
CAMP COBBOSSEE FOR BOYS
IN BEAUTIFUL MAINE
Top salary, accommodations and bene-
fits to experienced counselors with ex-
pertise in any of the following Swim-
ming (WSI). Sailing. Canoeing. Water
Skiing, Scuba Diving, Archery Rifelry
Tennis Colf, Teamsports Fencing
Gymnastics. Crafts & Woodworking.
Dramatics, Tripping, Photography
Nam Radio. Riding (English) Call or
write for information & application Act
now, our openings fill quickly'
Mnrmum Age Reqwreq 2')
CAMP OFFICE, Dept. 30
225 E. 57 St., NY, NY 10022
(212) 752-5853

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,- ! 1
4.
:
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F r. . Ap m22-24
14Fri. 7pm; Sat. l0aipm,4pm ; Sun. lprn,4pm

I 6

Tickets available at PTP Ticket Office
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, Mon.-Fri. 10-1, 2-5
For Information Call: 764-0450
Tickets also available at all Hudsons

eserw..

SPECIAL.

Coming Sunday, April

17th

S .9
pint
Featuring: RANDY CALIFORNIA
and ED CASSIDY
ALSO
SCOTCH
DOORS OPEN 7:00 P.M.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED
$5.50 COVER
WHAT'S HAPPENING AT THE
AN.CHOR INNJ

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