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March 17, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

..Page Twa

THE M(CH(GAN DAILY

.Thursday, N1c rch 17, 1977

Page-TwsTHE MCHIGAN AILY Tursday Mach1717

POETRY READING
Nels Johnason and Bart Plantengo
Readings from their work
Thurs., March 17-7:30 p.m.
at GUILD H OUSE
802 MONROE (corner of Oakland)
REFRESHMENTS
for anaement
opportu1nities
The United States Army is interviewing
sophomores and' other selected students hav-
ing two years remaining on campus for
future positions as Army officers.
Applicants are required to participate in a
six-week summer program at Fort Knox, Ky.,
to qualify for college ROTC courses next
year. Pay for the six weeks is approximately
$500, plus travel, room and board.
Students who complete the summer train
ing and enter ROTC do niot have to serve on
active duity' upon graduation.
Mak an appoinimen wt WI he0
CAR EER PL ANNING and
Room 3529, Student Activities Bldg.,
or coil 764-2400/2401.

®

(Continued from Page 1) but this is something that is al- Michael Dukakis
for the world to start thinking ways under assessment," the They selected C
about." President said. "In the long run, ly working class
CARTER reiterated his pre- if needed, I would recommend of 13,000 borde
viously-announced position that a restoration." main reservoir,
continued decline in reserve If conscription was restored, most guaranteed
military manpower strength Carter stated, he "would not ence for the P
might result in resumption of let college attendance be an road appearance
the draft. excuse for not being subject to thirds of Clinton'
"We are not yet planning in a draft." voted for Carter1
any way of restoring the c'raft, Last night's p
CARTER AIDES - many of 850 voters selecte
...wham had been in Clinton for lottery proved 4

Carter

Volunteers chase
U' Hospital blues

S.
Clinton, a large-4
industrial town
Bring Boston'sE
because it al-
a friendly audi-
resident's first!
e. Nearly two-
s 6,200 electors
last November.
acked house of
ed in a random
even more af-
ipated, regular-
the President
pplause - espe-
-M~-

cially when he recognized the
predominantly Irish town's on-
going St. Patrick's Day celebra-
tions by appearing with a green

i

{continued from Page 1)

ter,, altO'io'ih Fisch tells how

Find What You're
Looking For in
The Classifieds

"days co-ordinating preparations! table than antic
- seemed quite pleased with the ly interrupting,
town meeting venture, partially with vivacious ap
modeled after a regular prac-_
tice of Massachusetts Governor i '

carnation pinned to the lapel of tion in the facility's waiting a fK I moon strangely increases
his grey pin-striped suit. room. During weekly four-hour the emergency room load.
The President stayed over- shifts, theydkeep records, serve Thereare llls, but Fisch and
night at .the century-old clap- coffee, lend'. a sympathetic ear Greernlee. say the work- never
board home of Edward and and provide other services be-. grows boring. Storms always
Kat harine Thompson. HeEr yondthe capabilities of the em- follow the relative calm, they
planned to eat breakfast with ergency room's usually harried say.The volunteers don't wear
the Thompson family this morn- staff.Vteneir shseseorretblh..
ing before jetting to West Vir- Volunteers also venture behind!
ginia today to participate in a the emergency roOm's double' "ONE TIME, fifteen people
symposium on national energy doors to perform such services were in one room with a cardiac
yposiny.yIas transporting patients on arrest patient and I was left
policy. stretchers. However, they retainI all alone handling the nurse's
- the right to refuse that sort of! desk," Fisch recalled of her
s duty should they feel uncom-i most trying ordeal. "But I felt
' t I lfortable. good afterwards. I really felt
y C-lUAU "When the program started,! aporeciated' that night."
the staff wasn't used to us," Similar stories bloat the pages
* said Ann Arbor native Fisch, 'of the volunteer log, which son-
t // one of the original volunteers tains a summary of each shift's
1 "Now, if there wasn't a volun- experiences and suggestions for
teer service, they'd really miss improvement.Time after time,
us." !patienc~e and- rationality win out
bitration would be the quicKest THE FEELING is mutual.! over impatient protestations.
way to get (negotiations) over After joining the program, both Greenlee remembers the time
with.' Block said. Fisch and Greenlee have devel- he took a psychiatric patient to
The University has consistent-! oped into highly involved volun-' the X-ray room.
ly refused to submit to binding Leers. They often stay long after
arbitration since first reque.ted their shift's end. "HE WANTED to get up, and
by AFSCME. Fischa daytime secretary at then get a drink, and those were

-- -- rrm pare

WOMr EN'S
CAREER
FAIR
SAT., MARCH 19
8:30 A.M.-4:30 P.M.
MODERN LANG. BLDG.

Continued from Pagt }
tration in negotiations to .Jniver- I'
sity President Robben Fleiniig. I
Block, called the recent break-I
down in contract talks "a ser--,
ious problem which has got to l
be resolved."j '
"The union feels binding ar-:
F - -- I

k

"Binding arbitration is usual-E
ly only accompanied by an im-
passe," Chief University Nego-
tiator William Neff exxplained.
"It's usually used to avoid a!
strike. Now it wouldn't be as!
useful."
Talks between the University.
and AFSCME broke off last
Monday, with no new meetings
scheduled.

the hospital's children's psychi- thi
atric clinic, calls the volunteer; himdo, Greenlee recalled be-
work "morekfulfilling" than her Sm e tsdly yo jut cn'
clerical work. " Sometimes you just .can't
.make people understand about
Greenlee, a University sopho- oriorities and that kind of stuff,"
more pondering a pre-medical he lamented. "How do you ex-
program, delights at the chance plain things to people who aren't
for behind-the-scene emergency in a reasoning situation?"
room peeks and the opportunity Many patients expect imme-
to talk with University hospital' diate attention, an illusion which
staff members. Yet the volun- Fisch believes is created by
teer experiences offers him televised hospital programs.
more. Greenlee says some people oc-
casionally fear that the volun-
S LIKE a getaway," teers are "ot to get them,"
"IT'lesLiK A ' and ref".se to reveal even the
Greenlee said. "All you see at most basic information, such as
school are profs, TF's and stu- their names.

CARFFR

U

FREE WORKSHOPS:
assertion, skills assessment, job
seeking, interviewing, choosing a
major, alternatives to teaching
and much more...
CAREER PANELS:
communications, science, health,
social change, law, engineering,
business, and much more .. .

WUOM
ANN

Planning
Placement

I

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Illiilli

Aili

NOMINATI ONS FOR

if candidate is nominated by someone other than self, due date is 1:00,
Friday, March 18.a
If candidate is nominated by self, due date is 1 :00, Monday, March 21.
All .norminations must ,be in writing and submitted to Room 2006
Rackham by the above deadlines.
Nominations must include candidates' name, address, phone num-
ber, and academic department.
Nominations are for President and Vice President (who rmust run jointly)
and for positions on the Executive Council. Those eligible are all who are
currently enrolled in Rackham, or Graduate students in the School of
Education.
Any questions, phone 763-5271, 764-6309 or 663-0167
(after 6:00 p.m.), or contact current RSG representative.

T YODAY
8:05 p.m.
It's Up to You
classio music
request night
CALL 764-9210
MARCH 18
11:00 a.m.
The Eleventh Hour
7:00 p.m.
News and Interviews
about the arts
Ed Burrows, host
8:05 p.m.
The New York
Philharmonic
Works by Copland,
Falla, Bernstein,
and Debussy
MARCH 19
11:30 p.m.
Jazz
Tavi Fulkerson, host
MARCH 20

STUDY IN NEW YORK CITY
THIS SUMMER
Columbia University offers over
400 undergraduate and profes-
sional school courses.
For a bulletin write:
Summer Session, Columbia
University, 1020 Low,
N.Y., N.Y. 10027

dents. The emergency room
puts you back in society, with
real problems."
Thoase problems follow no pat-

i

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M SA EL ECTION
APRIL 4, 5 and 6
9 FULL-YEAR SEATS
Candidates May Register in MSA OFFICES:
Rm. 3909 Michigan Union BY MONDAY,
MARCH 21-5 P.M'

1

I

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4:45 p.m.
Earplay Radio
"Crime and
Punishment"
by Dostoevsky
Part 1

Theater

MARCH 23
8:05 p.m.
Opera Night
Rameau: Plateet
Evans Mirageas, host

-

Elections will be March 30 & 31 and April

1

.. ...
What can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
undergraduate education and a challenging, respon-
sible career. The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do
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If you are a senior of high academic standing and
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Contact your placement office for an interview with
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We will visitiyour campus on ,
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30
THURSDAY, MARCH 31
The Institute for
Paralegal Training
235 South 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103
(215) 732-6600
Operated by Para-Legal, Inc.

BUT FISCH and Greenlee
manage tohandle those prob-
lemrs. Greenlee constantly
roams the waiting room's brown
tile flogr, chatting with people
ready to blmrt out their most
pierson'al problems.
"Art is the best volunteer I've
ever worked with," Fisch said.
"It takes most of us a couple
of weeks to get into it, but he
was aromind talking to people
the first night."
And Fisch is no slouch" eith-
er, according to Greenlee. To-
gether, they move in well-tuned
harmony, often anticipating
each other's actions.
GREENLEE eagerly anticip-
ates future expansion of the
volunteer service, such as regu-
lar late night shifts which now
exist only on the weekends. But
Sno definite .plans exist..
The recent departure of Jer-
ry Krone, the former acting
chief of volunteers, may lead
to changes. Krone founded the
nrogram as a class project in
the University's Graduate
S'hool of Sociology.
Even t'ialy, Fisch and Green-
lee will also movne on. Fisch,
a part-time Washtenaw Cmmu-
: pity College student an'd church
camp counselor, says she's "just
samolig" at present.
The white smock may become
a permanent part ofmGreen-
lee's fuzture, despite some. inde-
cisiveness. Although he
throroughly enjoys the volun-
teer experience, it hasn't sold
him on a medical career.
"I've seen so many busy, ov-
er-worked doctors under the
pressure you don't feel as a
volnteer," he said. "And doc-
tors have the lowest average
life expectancy - 55. Only ac-
I tors are lower."
Midwests .arest SeIecton of
European Charters
Canadian and U.S.
- from $289
CAEL769-1776
- Greot Places _
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor

B

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JAZZ

SALE

the most beaUtiful sound
next to silence.
The entire ECM Jazz Catalog-the finest in con-
temporary music and recordings-is on sale now
at both Discount Records stores in Ann Arbor.
Because of a recent list price increase, this is the
last time ECM Recordings can be offered at these
low prices.
S.98 iist-3,99

U

9.98 ist-5.99
11.98 list-6,99
We also carry a complete selection of
Contemporary,Jazz.

I .: .. .: .:._: ..g LUSALE ENDS THURSDAY, MARCH 24th

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