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October 30, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-30

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MMMMEq

, October 30, 1977-The Michigan Daily

'ricks haunt Halloween

{Continued from Page1) go out tomorrow night, and ex-
)CAL children, however, seem to pressed anticipation of "all the
all the precautions pretty much candy" and "seeing everyone all
ride. dressed up."
like getting all the free candy, THE TRICKING aspect of Hallo-
I don't like the way people put ween seems largely to have been
and stuff in it," said Anthony separated from the treat part, how-
w, 10. ever.
e children interviewed, all fifth "One thing I remember is that if a
ers at Burns Park Elementary house had all its lights off, then it
ol, said their parents always meant that people were home, but
k their candy before they are they were choosing not to take part in
ved to eat it. the ritual, and therefore deserved to
ly parents look through all my be tricked," said Kottak.
ly and they take anything that's "There's not much tricking on
rapped and throw it away," said Halloween," said 10-year-old Amy
ear-old Sarah Stedman. Andrew Fischer. "Devil's Night (the night
ertson, 11, said his parents before) is trick night around here.
'ked for "pins, razor blades, poi- Kids go out and do lots of mean things
, and stuff." like soaping windows and putting
agardless of the risks involved, shaving cream on cars and throw-
he children said they planned to ing eggs." '
0
LSA Subcommittee on
Distribution Requirements
TELL US YOUR PLRAN-,
DISTRIBUTION, THAT IS!
OPEN HEARINGS, NOV. 1 & 2
7:30-9:30 2203 A NGEL L HALL :
Tell us why you chose your distribution plan-
general feelings, frustrations, gripes, suggestions. *
The End Report Affects You!
JELTA
'ksta uran t'Ie
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for$3.10
Home-made Chicken Noodle Soup '
served with:
Baked Ham'w/ Home-made Applesauce
Roast Chicken w/ dressing
Roost Turkey w/ dressing
Spaghetti and Meatballs (no potato or veg.)1
'DINNERS iNCLu'DE: A
Soup or Juice-Potato and Vegetable Bread and Butter-Small Beverage
Crisp Salad and Dressing Dessert: Rice Pudding or Ice Cream
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THE CHILDREN said that most of
the tricking was done by "older kids
who shouldn't be out anyway." All of
them also said they were forbidden
by their parents to go out on Devil's
Night.
"Lots of people don't know that you
can get picked up by the police on
Devil's Night," said Andrew.
"Recently, there's been a real
disassociation between the tricking
and the treating," said Kottak.
"Halloween has always represented
a ritualized rebellion where for one
night each year, kids could demand
things from their parents and get
them. Now, we're taking the tricking
part away from the kids and parents
are worrying that other adults are
doing the tricking. It's almost like a
role reversal."
THOUGH" PARENTS may be tak-
ing careful precautions, it is likely
that all their worries will be for
naught.
"There are always isolated cases,
but we've never had any serious
problems that I can remember," said
Deputy Police Chief Harold Olson.
"This type of thing usually happens
in big cities instead of someplace like
here."
"You hear rumors so you have to
watch out, but you hate to publicize it
for fear of giving someone ideas," he
said.

IT MAY LOOK like an advertisement for a new extr-str ength detergent, but it's actually the remnants of the Kappa Alpha
Theta soccer team after a clash with a tea n tn appa Kappa Gamma in the annual Mudbowl classic yesterday. The
Thetas are smiling because they won, 1-0.

'

R)Q eoggn'O I/iflg .*An al
time to party." said Erley. "But, there is a tendency
PERHAPS ONE of the most en- to aChe the ijexdi (ay."
thusiastic Homecoming participants Erley explained that alumni at-
was. alumni cheerleader Dune Erley, h° +7hmnt to the University is similar
who cheeed this weep in his "htl con to a "parent child relationship."
secutive Homecoming game. 'The school has really made us
"It's fun getting down on tii held what we ae," 'Erley stated. "We
and feeling like I'm twenty again," naturally feel a lot of affection for

.1m TIT 0 !1 A'"

4

something that has put us so far
towards our life's work."
ALUMNUS Chuck Furress, '34,
visiting from Dallas, Texas,.said he
thinks students may not get as much
out of Homecoming as alumni, but,
they "get a different sort of feeling."'

._.. ,

.t

CIA operatves active on national campuses

=1

(Continued from Page 1)

of Pennsylvania have been told of their
involvement with the testing.
WHILE THE country's reaction to
the intelligence agency's covert
research and secret funding policies
has been-not surprisingly-one of sur-
prise, and anger, the recruiting issue
has drawn even greater attack.
Educators, politicians and campus
governing bodies alikehave expressed
alarm at the presence of covert
recruiters in the cover of professors,
ISAT
WE CAN INCREASE
YOUR LSAT SCORE
Call or Write:
University LSAT Preparation Service Inc.
0 .Si4e9128
AnnAror'Mchgan 48105
4 , .3139954014

administrators and, sometimes,
students. A report resear ched by a
special Harvard committee in Miay,
1976, describes the recruitment process
this way:
"The job of covert recruiters is to
identify for the CIA members of the
community, including foreign students,
who may be likely candidates for an
employment or other relationship with
the CIA. . . When the recruiter believes
that a likely candidate has been iden-
tified, the name of the candidate is
reported to the CIA, which then conduc-
ts a background check on the individual
and creates a file . . . Neither the
recruiter nor the CIA informs the in-
dividual at this stage that he or she is
being considered for employment or
other purposes by the CIA. If the in-
vestigation confirms the view of the
recruiter, the. individual is then ap-
proached to discuss a present or future
relationship with the CIA."
THERE IS VERY little argument
from anyone that the p~pe wj0 io f fer;,
most from the covert irecritifnt b
CIA operatives on campus are fore gi
students.
SWhena foreign student is ap
Sproache i -in much the sarne way as
Ithat dram ratized at the beginning of this
story-they often have no choice but to
ac cept the CIA's offer' of recriuitmnent.
® Fomei gn students are very umuch

snsceptible to various kinds of black-
mail," alperin points out. If infor-
ma tion about their political views
reaches the IA, it could very well be
used later to pressure the new recruit.
The CIA works closely with intelligence
agenci s of other countries-Iran or
Koea , for instance--and often the two
'es exchange hits of information.
W N .Au1,PO 1"ED by an agent,
the fcoreign stlent has what some
woudi consider an impossible choice to
Whle the student may have made'
unpatr iotic remarks to his professor,
and therefore revealed himself as a
potential CIA r en- it, he may not be
unpatriotic enough to spy on his own
counti y,
Yet, if the student ref uses to work for
the CIA, hi unpatriotic ren- rks are
still on record in his CIA file. The agen-
ey could very well use the student's
name indi ,remark someday in
bai gir+ingr heigt:4n intelligence ser-
V-e i mOI'irfltiO t
a 9\ m(RII IN'I' case in-
vl : irmg an_)1r anl~instudRent at St. Louis.
W: , Imfingt n 1111ve'rsity was documen-
ted in a Ja 1976 article in New
ime a i Ahnad Jabbari was
app t""o;Aclcd b heHr CIA to deliver in-
f Inrai abio t theIranian gover-
llmnl'! Jbb 'i hd the presence of
imnid tose''! d yitpe record all his en-
countn 3wih isF('IA contact, and thus
a lte e to make public the go.
iu~ o. JaL~rri n ac, never wvent to
~oik fr he l lliene agency, but
nrtinrt ined his contacts by feigning in
tete 1n uh activi %.
Teranin dent was not only
otfer1d a mnthly stipend while he
was to ,be spying foi the agency, but
was toldtha l(I could help him
oia resident alien
sJtatu s,'" or' even U r. matiralization if
he w"'as cope r ative.
Foreign studenIten~counters with
("I A i' rt iitjit. te ,? : if bt,, often do not

work out as well as Jabbari's did.
Many foreign students attending
universities in this country today live
in fear of being exposed to their
countries by the CIA as dissidents.
HALPERIN BRINGS out an even
more basic point about foreign
student recruitment. "Students who
are invited to an American univer- ;
sity," he says, "have the right tofeel:
that they can engage in discussions
with their professors, write papers
and answer questions .in class with-.
out fear that one of their professors is.
in fact a CIA operative who will,
report that information to the CIA."
American students as well, Halper-
in adds, should have the same.
security.
The Harvard committee report
calls the involvement of faculty,
members and others in recruitment,
for the CIA "inappropriate."
"THE EXISTENCE of. . . uniden-
tified individuals who may be prob-
ing the views of others and obtain-
ing information for the possible use
of the CIA is inconsistent with the
idea of a free and independent uni-
versity,"' the report says.
Halperin was upset enough about
the Senate committee's findings that
he became the chairman of the;
Washington-based Campaign to Stop;
Government Spying, a group devoted,
to ending domestic surveillance of all'
types. Halperin has been campaign-
ing against government spying ever
since he discovered his home phone
was being tapped at the orders of-
President Nixon.
The CIA has no intention of ending
its involvement with American aca-,
demia, despite the disclosure of its
activities, according to the Senate
report. As long as the undercover
work is not illegal, the Senate
Committee says, "There are no
prohibitions to prevent an increase in
the operational use of academics.,
The size of these operations is,
determined by the CIA."
THE HARVARD Committee con A
cluded its report with a proposed set
of guidelines Which restrict the:
operations of the CIA on campuses'
requiring faculty members app,
proached by the agency to report the
incident to their dean.

QUIL APAYUI

An Evening of Music
in Soidarity with the
Chilean People
Friday, November 4
Rackhan Auditorium
8:00 pmr
$3.50 General Admission
Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights
inLatin American

I
I
I

Sundays
At the
UNION
BILLIARDS
at
reduced roles
'til 6 p.mr

"With great flair, the ensemble fused ancient Indian and
other folklore styles with contemporary protest lyrics, project-
ing always a sense of urgent intcnsity."
New York Times,
23 March, 1975

THE BI G

' 1

V I tt'Al

MICH IGA N ST UDEN T ASSE MBL Y
FALL ELECTION CANDIDATE REGISTRATION
(9) 1 EA (1) YAR $ gM' OPEN
REGISTER !1IN M..A [WS4t[LR
MICHIGAN UNION BY MONDAY t 3
For More information Cull
M.S A. Offices at 763-3241
AVAIL ABLE ONltYahU.CELLAR
,J- R
-
All cap & gownt orders Must be placed by
DECEMBER 18, 1977
(lectee cap &golwnt hood lpsTO111TAL
Baclelo. $b 25 2;00 8.25

VlTE MICHIGANXAXIIo.4
Sunday. October 30, 1977

See All The Action

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A

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