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October 26, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-26

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 26, 1977-page 3

ItJU SEE S fPEI4CAL WNW,
No, you take it
Some people, although willing to steal anything else, simply refuse to
steal the thunder from their partners in crime. That kind of argument,
perhaps over who got to lift the next television set, or who made the most
noise breaking in the door, split up a pair of burglars in Minneapolis yes-
terday. The pair apparently began arguing shortly after breaking into
one of several apartments, and each fought for their pride with gunfire.
Police took one of the burglars into custody, and later found several tele-
vision sets in the car. The second burglar, however, fled on foot, although
wounded. It leaves us to wonder whether it's crime or teamwork which
doesn't pay.
Happerings.. ..
should keep you hopping all day ... begipning with an annual sale of
theatrical costumes in the Frieze Building ... then go on to open an
exhibition by Ann Arbor painters in the Rackham Galleries at 10:00 a.m.
... stay there until 3:30 p.m. then meet with the Polish Speaking Circle in
the East European Studies Reading Room in Lane Hall ... you then have
fifteen minutes to catch the beginning of David Kupfer's talk on "EEG
Sleep Research and Affective Disorders" in Room 1057 of the Mental
Health Research Institute ... at 4 p.m., Boris Verkhovsky will address the
topic of "Marketing and Investments in Research and Technology Devel-
opment" in Rm. 229 W. Engineering ... also at 4 p.m., Georges Pasteur
discusses "Selection in Local Populations of Lizards" in Rm. 3056 of the
Natural Science Building ... moving right along, at 4 p.m., Basil Al-
Bustany of the World Bank outlines "Oil Prices and the Balance of
Payments in Arab Economies" in the CRED library, 5th floor of ISR ... at
4:10, George Barnard Shaw's Dark Lady of the Sonnets will be on stage at
the Arena Theatre in the Frieze Building ... also at 4:10, Dr. Jelena Hahl
lectures on "The Light Sound Dramas of Kandinsky" in Aud. D of Angell
Hall ... then take an hour or so off for dinner, before attending a meeting
of the Ann Arbor Libertarian League in Room 4 of the Michigan League ...
and the beginning of a mini-course on energy conservation is at 7 p.m.,
Rm. 124, E. Quad ... at the same time, the Society of Automotive
Engineers.will meet in Rm. 311 W. Engineering to discuss "The Buick
Turbo-Charged V-6 Engine" and other such delights ... at 7:30 the May 4th
Coalition will gather in the Anderson Room to discuss the Kent State
problem ... and AKTSIA will meet at Hillel at 1429 Hill ... the Baha'i
Student'Association will meet at the same time at the International Cen-
ter ... Ilse Graham will lead a seminar on "Heinrich von Kleist, 1777-1977:
Homage to a Misfit" at 8 p.m. in the West Conference Room in Rackham
... the Max Kade German House will show "Nicht Versohnt Oder Es Hilst
Nur, Wo Gewalt Herrscht" at the same time ... and the long day of tough
choices ends up with the Carl Jung discussion group at the Canterbury
House at 8 p.m.
0
Education for profit
It used to be that little kids would go to school for lack of alternatives
or for fear of parental punishment if caught at hooky. But now, in Dade
County, Florida, sone kids will be going to school to collect Frisbees,
hamburgers, T-shirts, yo-yos, and all those things you wish you could
have gotten as a reward just for going to school. The prize system goes
further than that, however. Teachers can earn gasoline, record albums or
dinners, merely for showing up to classes they were hired to teach. The
school systems in question have gone "away from basics" just to get back
to basics - with high truancy, the systems would lose out on state aid.
On the outside ...
Wecan all look forward to another gloomy day. The showers which
are expected in the morning should pour out by noon-time, and the clouds
should break up by the end of the day. Tomorrow's high will be around 65,
the low around 53. Batting average to date is 77 per cent.

Boob tube
ads bitting
the silver
screens
NEW YORK (AP)-If you hope to
escape the noisy barrage of commer-
cials on television by taking in a movie,
you may be in for an unpleasant sur-
prise. Beginning today, up to three
minutes of commercials will be ap-
pearing on the silver screens in 1,800
theaters in major U.S. cities.
But the big screen commercials won't
be as obnoxious as many of those on
television, says a spokesman for one
theater chain.
BECAUSE the cost of the movie
commercials is high-about $18 per
1,000 viewers compared with about $4
per 1,000 viewers for many television
commercials-industry officials expect
a "high class" product in the movie
houses.
"These will be soft, entertaining
commercials, not the king of hard-sell
commercial you see on TV for
deodorants," said one spokesman.
"They'll be scenes like beautiful
footage of skydivers falling through the
sky into logos of soft-drinks. That sort
of thing."
IN ADDITION, spokesmen say that,
unlike TV commercials, the movie ads
will not interfere with the continuity of
the show.
"Sure, the initial reaction might be
resentment," said a spokesman for the
New York-area exhibitors. "After all,
people leave their homes and
televisions because they don't want to
see commercials."
But he and others involved in the new
trend say commercials in movie
theaters are needed to' help offset
declining earnings. And, under one
plan, proceeds from the commercials
will be used to produce movies to coun-
ter what some theater owners say is a
shortage of films.
A FEW THEATERS around the coun-
try have been experimenting recently
with local ads for neighborhood
businesses and some theaters have for
years used still slides to advertise local
businesses. But two new operations are
set to begin using the commercials in
movie houses on a nationwide basis.
Roger Rautchuel, a Frenchman
whose firm already sells $20 million
worth of movie-house advertising each
year to European clients, said the
American operation will begin today in
1,800 walk-in theaters in New York, Los
r Angeles, Chicago and other major
cities.
Under Hautchuel's plan, each theater
will run three minutes of commercials
before each feature film. Movie house
owners will share in one-third of the
proceeds.
Another firm, Cinemavision, Inc., of
Nashville, Tenn., plans to begin
producing three-minute blocks of
commercials by mid-November. Within
three months, the firm expects to be
serving 4,000 theaters.
The industry spokesmen said resear-
ch projects showed there would be little
adverse moviegoer reaction to the
commercials. But to help offset any
possible resentment and criticism,
many exhibitors are planning to
distribute handbills to customers, ex-
plaining why the commercials are
necessary.

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Ruby,) Ruby

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i
'

_, . . '

a
s
i

Sensual.

But uplifting

as well.

Brilliant. But subtle too.
Gato draws the title of his latest album from the
familiar standard contained within. While the bulk of
the work is fashioned from personal originals and uni-
versal impressions of contemporary songs by Marvin
Gaye, Stevie Wonder and Herb Alpert.
If you've already heard Gato's first A&M album,
"Caliente, you happily know what to expect. Because

I I I

i I

-'
A/Ich
Home
/ Thursday, October 2
Theta Delta Chi presents:
Mad Miller Olvmpic

J,

.

r- tr

you've already experienced how

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his tenor sax "rises up from the
soil and reaches the flesh'

But if his new

release finds

ii,

igan
coming
'77
71

r K
t
i
t

you a liftle behind in your required
listening, there's no better time
than now to catch up with both
of Gato'sA&M albums.

I

I\t

"RUBY, RUBY."
FROM GATO BARBIERI.

} ' /

Triangle Fraternity house 1501 Wastenaw 8pm
Friday, October 28
Maize'n Blue Day
(wear your colors)
Evans Scholars'
Car Bash
north end of E University -C.C. Little Bldg. 3pm
Homecoming Parade
& Sigma Chi Pep Rally
parade leaving Dental school at 730pm
pep rally immediately Following at ia3
UAC Homecoming
Dance
Union Ballroomnds qade
aidmision=$1 beer b, soft drinks 9.30ipm

Saturday ,October, 29
SAE Mud.Bowl '77
corner of Wastenaw & S University 10 am
UAC Lawn Display

A GEM OF A NEW.ALBUM
ON A&M RECORDS & TAPES. RECORDS
Produced by Herb Alpert

-a

Judging
Mich an vs. Iowa
Stadium 1p
office of Mar Events presents:
Waylon Jennings
in. concert with
Hank Williams Jr.
& Jessie Colter
Crisler Arena 8:30pm tickets: S6& S7

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SCHOOL

IDS'

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_ _ .....

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