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October 05, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-10-05

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-Wednesday, October 5, 1977-The Michigan Union

oters must reveal
(Continuedfrom Page ) really got to me to see her do that, it "SOMETIME ON Monday we were
ey with indefinite imprisonment for was beautiful," said Grace, still told we would not have to say who wer
empt of court, wiping his'eyes with a handkerchief. voted for," said Lazinsky. "It is a
san Van Hattufi, 21, a University Grace has a "standing objection" violation of my rights to say who I
ent, said she "preferred to remain to asking the 20 voters how they voted for."'
it," rather than divulge her choice. voted. He told the court, "No one Judge Kelley treated Lazinsky

mayoral choices

REFERRING TO the 20 voters under
uestion, Hadamsaid, "Everyone told
s we were Ann Arbor reesidents. I was
rought up all my life believing that my
ote was my own private business."
Kelley informed Van Hattum of the
ossible consequences of her noncom-
lance with a ruling of the court. The
idge told Van Hattum she could be
etained "until the jail doors are un-
eked by your testimony."
But Van Hattum was not dissuaded.
ben Kelley asked her once more to
nswer the question, she whispered
No" to the hushed courtroom.
KELLEY THEN told Van Hattum
he was "in contempt of court for
efusing to answer the question, and
emanded her to the county jail."
Van Hattum only spent an hour-
nd-a-half in the Judge's chambers
zhandcuffs before she was released
nd told to reappear before the court
he morning of October 11.
Robert Grace, Mayor Wheeler's
ttorney was moved to tears. "It

admitted they voted illegally. Be-
yond that, it is a question of fairness,
at no point was it said this would be
done. In fact, Mr. Henry and myself
stipulated that voters would not be
asked how they voted.
"IT IS A fundamental question of
lulling people into believing one thing
and then doing another. If Mr. Henry
has made a mistake in trial tactics he
should have to deal with it."
Grace went so far as to motion for a
mistrial, claiming he was not pre-
pared to defend Mayor Wheeler
against Henry's new strategy. Kelley
denied the motion for mistrial.
Five witnesses who voted illegally
were asked how they voted in the
election. Two said they chose Wheel-
er, one chose Belchet; Van Hattum
and Diane Lazinsky refused to an-
swer.

somewhat differently than Van Hat-
tum. He merely told Lazinsky there
might be a contempt charge leveled
against her and that she may spend
time in jail if she does not answer the
question. Kelley told her to think
about the consequences and return to
court for next Tuesday's session.
"I DON'T THINK anybody be-
lieved when we started this that we
had the legal right to inquire how the
illegal voters voted. I came upon the
precedents just recently as I was
doing some research for the case,"
explained Henry.
"If_ we can determine how the
illegal voters voted, we can eliminate
election by guess, which is exactly
what Mr. Grace is suggesting."
Since the trial began Monday, the
attorneys representing Belcherand
Wheeler have offered different alter-

u
a
e
f.
n
i1
t

natives for how the election can be
settled.
HENRY WOULD either like to see
the election voided or the results
overturned.
On Monday Grace offered two
alternatives for settling the disputed
election: whole vote reduction and
fractional vote reduction.
Under the whole vote reduction
method, in precincts where there are
illegal votes, the candidate with the
winning plurality would have one

vote deducted from the plurality for
each illegal vote.
The fractional vote reduction
works much the same way, except
votes are taken from both candidates
in proportion to the fraction of votes
each received in the precinct..
These are the alternatives Henry
calls "election by guess."
In addition to the illegal voters,
several- election officials took the
stand.
City Clerk Jerome Weiss, Washten-
aw County Clerk Robert Harrison,

Jane Steeb, a precinct worker, and
Martha Olmstead, chairwoman of
the Washtenaw County Board of
Canvassers, all testified about sev-
eral questionable absentee ballots.
Four absentee ballots are the
major contention in the trial.
The next trial date is October 11,
and none of the attorneys involved in
the case would hazard a guess as to
how long the proceedings will con-
tinue. Hearings on the petition filed
by Belcher began in May.

MSA discusses new
student office space

WCBN

99? pFr

,,-..
".

By PAULINE TOOLE
Michigan Sit u d e n t Assembly
(MSA) last night discussed computer
balloting for next fall's MSA election,
announced four students have been
selected to join a University commit-
tee looking into University invest-
ments in South Africa, and debated
the problem of student office and
activities space at length.
MSA presently contrQls the alloca-
tion of 50 spaces to be used by student
organizations for offices, located
primarily on the fourth floor of the
Union. With the exception of the
locations of seven organizations al-
ready on the fourth floor, this space
will be re-allocated during the com-
ing week.
MSA has also investigated the
feasibility of obtaining new student
space by. constructing a new building
which would be located behind the
Coliseum on the corner of Fifth
Avenue and Hill Street.
In the course of the recommenda-
tion, MSA investigated the possibility
of remodeling the Union to obtain
more space. This was decided to be
unfeasible.
The proposed cost of the new
facility would be $750.000.

Administrative reaction to this
project has been mixed. Vice-Presi-
dent James Brinkerhoff hassuggest-
ed that MSQ reconsider the remodel-
ing of the Union. President Robben
Fleming, on the other hand, suggest-
ed that MSA present the new
proposal to the Regents at their
October.meeting.
MSA member John Lauer hoped to
present the names of the four
students nominated for the Univer-
sity's South Africa committee, but
could not find the list at the time of
the meeting.
Two of the four will be chosen by
SACUA. These two candidates will be
present at the MSA meeting next
week for review of their stances and
qualifications.
The purpose of the committee will
be to determine community feeling
regarding the investments of Univer-
sity money in corporations with hold-
ings in South Africa.
In other action, MSA voted to
support the May 4 Coalition in
sponsoring an armband day October
12 to demonstrate the solidarity in
opposing the construction of a gym at
Kent State on the site where four
students were killed in 1970.

WCRN-uFM
JAZZ-BLUES.ROCK & ROLL
IYTHM & BLUES-REGGAE-SALSA
GOSPEL-COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

,

-?~ffgo44DAY

Work in Washington, D.C.
This Summer
sponsored by Washington Summer Intern Program
POSITIONS IN Congressional Offices, Executive Agencies,
Lobbying Organizations, News Media, Research Organizations,
and Museums.
(UNDERGRADUATES ONLY)
MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY-7130-OCT. 12
MLB Auditorium 3

Walk.
Just for the
health of it,
Get moving, America!
March 1-7. 1977 is
National Physical Education and Sport Week
Physical Educa*ion Public n*orm*tion
Amnerican Aliance for Health.
Physical Fducal'on and Recreation
1201 161h Si N W. Washington, D C 20036

EVEN RARER than a pink elephant or a cheap gallon of gas is this tip of an iceberg in Iowa. It was taken there
by Saudi Arabia's Prince Mohammed al Faisal to attend a convention in Ames.
They only have ice for you

AMES, Iowa (AP) - While scien-
tists from around the world say it
might be possible to tap icebergs for
drinking water, some experts say
potential problems could be as big as
the bergs themselves.
Bad weather, rough seas, melting,
possible climate changes and simply
hooking a tow wire to an iceberg
were some of the potential difficul-
ties brought out at the first Inter-
national Conference on Iceberg Utili-

zation here this week.

THE FIVE-DAY conference end-
ing tomorrow is being funded by the
government of Saudi Arabia, which
is interested in using melted ice-
bergs to provide water to the arid
desert nation.
"There are serious questions about
just how strong an iceberg is," said
Dr. , John Kennedy, a hydraulic
engineer from the University of Iowa

who has been studying ice for several
years.
One problem is the effect stlt in the
sea could have on the fresh water of
the iceberg when it is towed to
warmer climes and begins to melt.
Prof. Ali Mansoori of the Univer-
sity of Illinois said another problem
is the lack of information on how fast
an iceberg fnelts. What will happen
as the ice moves into warmer water
"just is not clear," Mansoori said.

- - -- v ...

A first.
Dennis Wilson becomes the first of the Beach Boys to record and

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