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September 11, 1977 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Pdge 6--Sunday, September 11, 1977-The Michigan Daily
Bedpans. bargains fill auction

Lance must resign, B
(ContinuedfromPagel) Friday, Bloom says he resisted
efforts by FBI agents to learn about

I _1

(ContinuedfromPagel) spending more than $30 or $35.

HOWARD DORNE had another
idea for the bedpan.
"I thought about autoclaving it and
using it for a serving dish," said
Dorne, a fourth year Inteflex student.
Dorne was waiting for the auction-
ing to start on a small brown desk,
but considered his chances of acquir-
ing it slim, since he didn't plan on

"THEY'RE GETTING more
money than the stuff is worth," he
said.
But one physician insisted there
are bargains galore at every auction.
Yesterday, he claimed to have spent
only $300 for some technical equip-
ment which would have cost him
$3,000 new.

Ke

Ruthan Helmer, wife of one of the
auctioneers, also testified to the
bounty of bargains. She recounted
the story of a man who purchased
what looked like a simple wooden
tobacco jar for $240. Helmer found
out later that the jar was ornamented
with precious metals and was worth
at least twice what the man paid.
Nobody but the purchaser knew the
actual value of the jar.,
But no matter what is on sale, be it
bedpans or vases, auctions seem to
empty people's pockets.
"There is never anything left,"
Helmer said.
Alfred Dreyfus, (1859-1935), a
French army officer convicted of
treason whose case became a cause
celebre when he was shown to be a
victim of anti-Semitism, was later
cleared of the treason conviction.

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Heimann issued a report Aug. 18
saying he found nothing in Lance's
financial affairs that warranted pros-
ecution. But the entire affair has put
a lot of people on the spot.
As one of Lance's closest friends
and advisors, President Carter has
publicly backed him during the
controversy. After Heimann's report
came out, Carter told Lance, "Bert,
I'm proud of you."
THE LANCE case was cited as one
factor for the recent slippage in
Carter's public popularity as mea-
sured by an opinion poll. The IRS
report also raises questions about
how much Carter knew about
Lance's finances before naming
Lance to the budget post.
. According to the IRS report, John
Moore, who was in charge of ethics
for the Carter transition team, and
Lance telephoned Carter on Dec. 1
and discussed with him a news
release dealing with problems that
Lance's Calhoun bank had with the
comptroller.
Moore "inferred that Mr. Carter
was knowledgeable of the matters
discussed," the report said. The news
release was never issued.
CARTER SAID yesterday that he
knew of only one Lance financial
aroblem before -he nominated him
Dec. 3. That problem dealt with the
overdrafts by Lance's campaign
committee during his bid in 1974 for
the Georgia governorship.
Robert Bloom, the acting comp-
troller during the transition months,
felt the sting of the Lance affair since
telling the Senate in January that
Lance "enjoys a good reputation in
the banking community."
In the IRS report made public.

Lance's bank problems because of
fears it would violate the confiden-
tiality of banks.
AN ATTORNEY for Lance ac-
knowledges talking to the then-U.S.
attorney in Atlanta, William Stokes,
on the day Stokes ended the criminal
investigation of Lance's gubernator-
ial campaign finances. Stokes said he
had thought the investigation had
ended months ago and he was closing
the books on the case.
Stokes, a Republican, said Friday
that unnamed Justice Department,
officials had withheld detrimental
information about Lance from Con-
gress. However, the White House
pointed out that dongressional com-
mittees could have asked for any
relevant information about Lance
but they didn't.
Hordes dri
and etat
(Continued from Page 1)
BEER DRINKING, too, was rampant
at the festival as each nation boasted of
producing the finest brew. Serious beer
drinkers, though, eventually wound
their way to the German booth's "Deut-
schen Biergarten" where a polka band
led the crowd in boisterous German
drinking songs.
"This is crazy," said University
sophomore Jan Stanfeld of her visit to
the Biergarten. Stanfeld said she
thought that even the weekend crowd at
Dooley's is quieter.
Ethnic crafts were also prevalent, of-
fering festival visitors the opportunity
to snatch up unusual foreign goods.
Gauze shirts were up for grabs at the
Indian booth, and just down the street,
one could purchase hand-carved
wooded jewelry boxes conspicuously
tagged "Made in Poland." Many booths
also featured native artwork.
Modern Technique
at
DANCE SPACE
3141 S. State
taught by
LINDA PECK
Begins Sept. 12
for info; call 995-4242

yn dsays
The Senate Governmental Affairs
Committee asked few questions
about Lance's finances at his con-
firmation hearings. Although
Bloon 's letter praised Lance, it did
mention the Justice Department
investigation and some family over-
drafts. The committee never asked
for an FBI report on Lance.
Byrd said Saturday the revelations
about Lance's finances are an indict-
ment of the Senate confirmation
process. He said the confirmation
machinery is adequate but that "in
all too many instances, confirmation
has been virtually a rubber stamp."
Lance faces more troubles with his
own finances. He owes the First
National Bank of Chicago $3.4 mil-
lion, and in the past few weeks, the
bank has gotten Lance to sign over
four of his major real estate holdings
as additional collateral.
ink, dance
ethni~c fe's
PERHAPS THE BEST-bargain at th
festival was at the Italian booth wher
kisses and pinches were offered free o
charge.
On both evenings of the festival, liv
entertainment was provided to demon
strate the music and dance of differeni
cultures. Popular groups such as th
Arab Beledi dancers and the Iris
Champion Step Dancers pleased audi
ences with dynamic performances.
According to Peg'Burgess Presiden'
of the Multi-Ethnic Alliance, the fes
tival was designed to "share the
ethnicity of all these cultures in the An!
Arbor community."
Burgess said the event is non-profit
any money collected will be used t
sponsor alliance activities such a:
cultural displays and tutors for non
English speaking Ann Arbor publi
school students.
"THE ANN ARBOR ethnic commu
nity is very cooperative and enthusias
tic," said past Alliance president Kitt;
Wallace. "We. support each other'
functions so we can learn more abou
the heritage ofhour fellow Americans."
Possibly the best example of th
community's cooperative ethnic spirn
could be seen at the festival yesterday
While a sign in front of the Jewish boot
proclaimed "Shalom: means peace,"
sign not far down the block at the Ara
booth requested passersby to "Pray fo
Peace."

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