100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 11, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily--Sunday, sep em er eit --rager-

English balladeers triumph at Ark

Bowling Leagues Now Forming
MENS, WOMENS and MIXED
SIGN UP NOWI
UNION LANES
Bowling for leagues 504
regular rates 654
Open: 10 a.m. Mon.-Fri.; I p.m. Sat. 8 Sun.

0

By WENDY GOODMAN
and MIKE TAYLOR
Traditions flourish - even in the
everchanging, inconstant Ann Arbor.
The Ark coffee house on Hill Street, just
entering its thirteenth year as a haven
for local folk music buffs, is such a tra-
dition, as are John Roberts and Tony
Barrand, two proponents of old English
folk culture who have visited Ann Arbor
twice a year for the past seven years.
Friday night brought his fascinating
pair of transplanted Britishers to the
Ark once again.
Although the stage appeared clut-
tered with instruments, many songs
were sung unaccompanied, in the tra-
ditional pub fashion. "Usually you'd
have a pint in your hand," explained
Barrand. Thus the focus was often on
Barrand and Roberts' strong, harmoni-
ous voices. Without instrumentation,
the words took on a truly stirring char-
acter.
From time to time, however, they

turned to a variety of instruments to
achieve a more colorful effect. To tunes
ranging from "The Legend of the Danc-
ing Bear," and "Foggy Dew," to an ob-
scure version of "Waltzing Matilda,"
the pair played accordion, concertina,
banjo, guitar, mandolin, bones, drum,
and an occasional set of spoons. "The
song dictates the kind of instruments
we use," stated Roberts.
Most of the songs Barrand and Rob-
erts perform originated in the seven-
teenth century and were updated and
changed as time passed, marking these
tunes as true folk songs. The first ones
collected were written down by educa-
tedomen and "little old ladies on bi-
cycles." "Whenever we get interested
in a certain theme or area we research
it to find out as' much about it as we
can," remarked Barrand. Roberts
claimed to have a folk library rivaling
that of the University of Michigan.
As the songs were passed on, their
melodies were often altered. In addi-
tion, varying styles of instrumentation

"a

9j~A ar aCJP I JFJ CJ001FJ JP Ia-FJ~,J§

"
Introduction to
StainedGas
ii
FREE 2 HOUR DEMONSTRATION
CONDUCTED BY
Roy DarwinArt Worlds
RoyDarin213 SO. Main St.
Wed. Sept. 149-
7:00 pm
IJC JC [7 ,

1
E
i
I

John Roberts and Tony Barrand relax before their Saturday per-
formance at the Ark. The English music hall balladeers appeaed
Friday and Saturday nights.

_

r

I

I
I

t
r
r

I1

"I

I

-re

'1

1*

became part of the songs themselves.
Barrand and Roberts are part of this
folk process themselves. Reflecting
upon this, Roberts noted, "Many of the
songs we do we learned from artists
who sing them unaccompanied: We
added the instrumentation ourselves."
Through their investigation into old
English folk music the pair have un-
covered a wealth of material that is not
music at all. Barrand the storyteller is
as captivating as Barrand the singer.
For example, during "The Story of Sam
Small," the hero of the battle of Water-
loo, Barrand portrayed characters
ranging from privates to the Duke of
Wellington, with each taking on a
unique but believable personality.
The two of them, who first met doing
graduate work at Cornell, teach psy-
chology of art in Vermont when not
traveling with their music. As "profes-
sional Englishmen," Roberts, and Bar-
rand have tried to maintain their native
dialects, even though both are now U.S.
citizens.
All the songs and stories the two per
form are from cultures whose language
Barrand and Roberts are comfortable
and familiar with. "I'd never do a Scot-.
tish song," Barrand emphasized. "I
just don't know enough about their lan-
guage. If you don't know the language
and the people, you can't portray their
songs with any meaning."
Before each song, Barrand and Rob-
erts taught the audience the chorus.
Traditionally, according to Barrand,
"This allowed the singer to drink bet-
ween verses." Like most crowds at the
Ark, this was a most willing one; at
times th- room filled with soaring,
voices.
Before concluding the first set, Bar-
rand calmly announced, "during the
second set, please ignore the TV cam-
eraman walking around stepping on
your hands and filming." The film crew
from Channel 2 News wanted everyone
to act naturally when they added
thousands of watts of light to the nor-
mally dim rooms. The thought of out-of-
town publicity and perhaps some reve-
nue for the financially distraught Ark
boosted the audience's enthusiasm ad-
ditionally.

Roberts and Barrand have made a
number of albums, including one soon
to be released on the Folkways Legacy
label. Each record has its own thematic
focus due to the pair's changes of inter-
est and knowledge.
Barrand's clog dancing, wiich open-
ed the third set, was one highlight of the
evening. Another highlight was the sur-
prise appearance, shortly after mid-
night, of the Highwoods String Band.
The band, on their way to a festival, had
time to do only a few numbers, but the
crowd loved them. Percy Danforth,
Ann Arbor's master of the bones, joined
them for a couple of tunes, making the
evening all the more special.
It was a warm, informative, and en-
tertaining way to spend a few hours, but
that's nothing out of the ordinary for the
Ark. As Barrand noted, "Linda and
David Siglin, operators of the Ark, un-
derstand two things: first, traditional
music, and second, entertainment.
They offer a little bit of everything
here."
MUSEUM GUIDE
TOLEDO,-Ohio (AP) - The To-
ledo Museum of Art has published a
new "Guide to the Collections," in
honor of its 75th anniversary.
This 96-page book contains over 400
black and white and 38 color illustra-
tions of the paintings, sculpture,
furniture, glass and ceramics from
the museum's collection. The book is
arranged chronologically by culture.

MARSHALL'S
LIQUORS
BEER-IMPORTED & DOMESTIC
WINES-IMPORTED 8 DOMESTIC
CHAMPAGNE-ICE
COMPLETE LINE OF PARTY ITEMS
DRUG ITEMS-COSTEMICS
OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY
9 A.M.-11 P.M. - SUNDAY 11 A.M.-7 P.M.
NO 2-1313
235 S. STATE ATE. LIBERTY

Iftill ii

Bac-kAlley Playe rs
reaidy newproduction
JBy-JOE IAUN4)S .which will.. be performed this week

We con help you get the best possible score.

To many aspiring actors,. the Univer-
sity stages are no place to be anybody.
Frequently students cannot find roles in
the theater department productions,
and -so many groups have formed to
c r eate their own theater, presenting
works of Albee, Sam Shepard, and
Irmamu Baraka.
The Back Alley Players, 'originally
the Streetpeople Players, were put to-
gether by Ron "OJ" Parson as, a via-
able alternative to University theatre
productions. In the past, the group has
performed experimental pieces, such
as Baraka's Dutchman. This winter,
they are planning a production of his
The Toilet, a work set in a junior-high
school john. Also on the boards are pri-
son dramas such as The Poison Tree
aid Manuel Pinero's Short Eyes.
Students need experimental drama
and theater as a testing ground for their
ideas and an outlet for frustrations.
Parson is not frustrated, however,
when it comes to casting. "Everyone
just said they'd be so-and-so," he guf-
faws.
The Arena, the University's most inti-
mate histrionic setting, makes the
house part of the action. The Back Alley
Players are happy to oblige with what
Parson describes as "gut-level"
.heater.
Parson is well-acquainted with
Charles Gordone's Pulitzer-Prize-win-
ning work, No Place to Be Somebody,

Wed.2'Sun., Sept. 14-18 at the Arena
Theater. He acted in the 1976 University
production, and assisted,! as artist-in-
residence, in another mounting at the
University of Delaware.
The play itself takes place in a West
Village bar, and concerns the lives of
Gabriel, an embittered actor, and his
friends, assorted pimps; prostitutes,
and habitues of the bar. The cast in-
cludes Jim. Martin, John McCants,
David Grier, Eva Gower, Dawn Coop-
er, Char Bailey, and others. Music is
provided by the Streetpeople Band.

* CAN YOU PREPARE FOR THE LSAT?
Both ETS and many law students admit that students often! score
significantly higher the second time they take the LSAT. We give
you the familiarity needed to score your best the first time. More
importantly we will help maximize your score through error avoid-
ance and time saving techniques.
* WHY OUR LSAT
PREPARATION COURSI?
We cost $125, only half that of other Courses. We schedule
classes during the four weeks prior to the exams to increase
retention. Our instructors are available seven days a week to help
with any problems. Our maximum class size of 12-18 allows
individual instruction. And much, much more.

I

I.
I
[
d'
uj
U;
U,
K,
tf
is
Y
uI
.4i

}
y
4'

ANO A RBO R, i- 410
mow. -SA f. 10 -5%
PURE WOOL " FABRICS " DYES " SILKS
L.INENSCOTTONS* ALPACAJUTE
METAL ICS " SISA L " REED " RAFFIA
BOOKS " NEEDLES " MORDANTS
LOOMS & WEAVING ACCESSORIES
* MCMt48)4

To receive complete information at no cost or obligation
cal 995.4014sor write:
I Address Zip
I University LSAT
Preparation service, Inc.
2200 Fuller Road, Suite 912B
Ann Arbor, MI 48105

2200 Fuller Rd., Suite 912B
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
313-995-4014
Classes begin
on campus Sept. 14

3150 Carpenter Rd. " 971-4310

CARF FR

Groatest Used Paperback Sale In Hisfoiy
All USED Paperbacks
Usually 25% (or more) off list
NOW an EXTRA 20% off
SAVE as never before
on our huge selection of used books

I

arerPlanningr & Placement
3200 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
Planning $ PHONE: 764-7460
Placement
ON-CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
SEPT. 30 thru NOV. 22, 1977
All Degree Candidates Can Schedule Appointments:
e With employers for career positions in schools, industry,
business, or government.
. With employers for summer jobs.
" With graduate/professional schools for program information
and admission requirements.

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan