100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2-Saturday, Janury 14, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Church Worship Services

Carter's USSR-Africa
remarks anger Soviets

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
ChurchSchool at9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students..
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-10 p.m.
Sunday-7:45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus-9:30 a.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
4:00 p.m.-Film; "King: Mont-
gomery to Memphis."
Tuesday-3:30 p.m.-Seminar: Reli-
gious Experiences.
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: "Historical
Jesus/Risen Lord"-9:30 a.m.
Monday Bible Study: "Women in the
Bible"-8:00 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study: "History of the
Bible"-7:30 p.m.
Thursday evening Bible Study on
North Campus-8:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice, Ministers
10 a.m.-Morning Service.
5 p.m.-Informal Worship.
ANew
Copying Center
lowest prices in the area
MOST COPIES
ONLY 3C
FINE QUALITY
FAST SERVICE
RACKHAM COPIES
Canticore Bookshop
1229 S. University
665-2604 8 am-10 pm

UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS )
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Worship Wednesday, 10:00
p.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7$21
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Sunday Services at 10a.m., 6p.m.
Coffee hour- 1:15 a.m.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10a.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER AND
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron-663-9376
0. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Ronald E. Cary, Minister
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-11
a.m.
Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
7:45 p.m.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Choral Evensong Sunday evenings at
7:00 p.m. at St. Andrew Episcopal
Church, 306 N. Division.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Christian Science Reading Room-,
206 E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday;
closed Sundays.

MOSCOW (AP) - President Car-
ter came under sharp attack in the
Moscow press yesterday, accused of
having "deliberately distorted" the
facts surrounding Soviet military aid
to Ethiopia's Marxist government.
Tass commentator Yuri Kornilov.
expressed particular anger that Car-
ter made his remarks "at the level of
a head of state" in light of recent
U.S.-Soviet moves toward reaching a
strategic arms limitation treaty.
KORNILOV SAID Carter was seek-

ing "to shift the responsibility for the
creation of a new seat of tension in
Africa to the Soviet Union" and that
"such attempts can hardly be as-
sessed otherwise than as a deliberate
distortion of the true state of affairs
with a view to casting a slur on the
position of the U.S.S.R."
It was the sharpest verbal attack
on Carter in the months following
initial Soviet outrage over the U.S.
President's human rights campaign.
Lately the Soviet press has been

Investigators begin.
Park interrogation

SEOUL, South Korea (AP)-Ameri-
can and Korean investigators began
questioning Korean'lobbyist Tongsun
.Park yesterday about his part in a
Washington payoff scandal.
After months of negotiations between
Washington and Seoul, the 42-year-old
rice dealer signed an agreement Wed-
nesday to tell U.S. Justice Department
officials and American courts
everything he knows about the alleged
influence-buying scheme.
THE FREE-SPENDING bachelor is
accused of trying, as a foreign gover-
nment agent, to win support for South
Korea in Washington with cash, gifts
and other favors. About 20 former and
present U.S. congressmen have
acknowledged that they received
money or other gifts from Park, but
they have denied any wrongdoing.
He has been indicted by a federal
grand jury on 36 counts of bribery, mail
fraud and other charges.
Park, accompanied by his American
lawyer, William Hundley, arrived at
the federal prosecutor's office in down-
town Seoul shortly before 10 a.m. He
was met by scores of foreign and

Korean reporters and photographers.
NEITHER PARK nor Hundley made
any comments as they moved through
the crowd of reporters and into the
building.
Park was taken to a courtroom
across the hall from the interrogation
room and administered both Korean
and American oaths. The group then
moved into the investigation room and
the doors were closed.
Park signed a memorandum
pledging to divulge the full truth about
his dealings with the past and current
members of' the U.S. Congress. The
document pledges Park to answer the
questions of U.S. investigators in Seoul
and, if required, in American courts in
return for full immunity from pending
criminal charges against him.
American officials told reporters
Thursday Park would be questioned
first by Korean investigators and that
U.S. Deputy Attorney General Ben-
jamin Oiviletti and his group then
would take over until they obtain the in-
formation they needed. A lie detector
will be used, American officials said.

accenting Carter's pro-detente state-
ments.
Carter told a Washington news
conference Thursday the Soviet Un-
ion is sending arms and personnel to
help Ethiopia fight off ethnic Somalis
battling for control of Ethiopia's
Ogaden desert in the Horn of Africa,
the land mass that juts into the Gulf
of Aden and Indian Ocean from East
Africa. The rebels want to join the
region to neighboring Somalia.
* WHILE THE United States has
avoided interjecting itself into the
seven-month-old war, Carter said,
"the Soviets have done just the oppo-
site." He called for a U.N. Security
Council meeting on the issue, a move
that could result in a direct U.S.-
Soviet face-off.
The Tass commentator, while
claiming Carter had a "total disre-
gard for the facts," did not directly
deny that the Soviet Union has helped
Ethiopia in some ways. Tass report-
ed in another dispatch yesterday that
Ethiopian leader Mengistu Haile
Mariam had expressed "sincere
gratitude to the countries of the
socialist community for all-round
aid to the Ethiopian revolution."
The State Department has estimat-
ed the Soviet Union and Cuba
together have supplied Ethiopia with
as many as 3.000 men now fighting in
the Ogaden region, vast portions of
which are already under rebel con-
trol.
KORNILOV called Carter's claim
that the Soviet Union was dispatch-
ing Cuban soldiers into the Ogaden
"absurd and absolutely irrelevant".
and the commentator contended that
Cuba sets its own foreign policy.
Last November, Somalia expelled
Soviet advisers and Cuban personnel,
accusing both countries of escalating
the Ogaden conflict by openly aiding
Ethiopia. Kornilov claimed the Unit-
ed States has been aiding Somalia
militarily, despite U:S. disclaimers,
and cited Western press reports that
Somalia has received U.S. arms
through Saudi Arabia.

- ---
GET MOVING,
AMERICA!
Try
Daily
Classifieds

do'l

I

Look for:
The GerbilMgaine
ON SALE NOW
in the Fishbowl
and Campus-Area Stores

tCOPY Sr
(Continued from Page 1)
say said. "It's a losing proposition.
"I know one professor who just won't
publish anymore. He says he could
make more money raking leaves."
Forbes said the reasoning behind-
course packs is merely to facilitate the
exchange of ideas and to get students

he never reads anything he copies for
two reasons: time and confidentiality.
"ACTUALLY, I don't know if I'm
liable or not when a customer brings in
something illegal," DeBoer said, "but
my personal feeling is that it's the cus-
tomer's responsibility."

The 1978 Michiganensian
(U-M's yearbook)
is looking for students interested in working on the
business staff. Positions are open in marketing,
sales, and general business.
No experience necessary,
we will train you.

tops in trouble?

O
The DAILY'S
PHONE NUMBERS:
Billing 764-0550
Circulation 764-0558
Classifieds 764-0557
Display 764-0554
News & Happenings
764-0552
Sports 764-0562

"You bet they're (copy shop owners) liable too. They'd
like to have it that way, but they can't put their heads
in the sand."
-James Stephenson, Ann Arbor attorney

place articles in journals don't do so for
profit.
"They do it for recognition," he said.
"And generally you're talking about 25
students per class, which is not a very
large number, so it's not going to affect
the market."
STILL, SOME copiers are worried.
Bill Slack, owner of the new Dollar Bill
Copying on South University, said he
has a regular copier in addition to his
large one because the larger machine
won't do books. Does that mean he's
still making multiple copies from
books?
"Well ... I'm not going to answer
that," he said. Slack said he doesn't
know if he is liable for what he prints,
since there haven't been any test cases
yet, but, like Forbes, he is concerned
with the possible implications of the
new law.
"What I think it could do is prevent a
lot of people from coming in to make
copies," he said.
At Albert's, the new law has caused
few ripples so far. With two shops, 50
employees, and 13 machines, Albert's
produces a "base figure" of about one
million copies per month, according to
Forbes.
"I would characterize business as
being 'go'od to excellent'," he said.

out of the library.
"THERE'S NO intention to destroy
the market for an author," he said.
"Most of our professors are authors,
so we can't afford to disregard au-
thors," he explained. "Most of the pro-
fessors appreciate our position. Forbes
said some professors, concerned by
"scandal stuff that's been written about
the new law," had discussed the prob-
lem with him.
Thecopy shops are on shakier legal
ground when it comes to non-classroom
materials, which are not exempted
from the new law. Dave DeBoer, owner
of Copy Quick on South University, said

James Stephenson, an Ann Arbor at-
torney specializing in copyrights and
patents, emphatically disagreed.
"You bet they're liable too," he said
of thecopy shops. "They'd like to have
it that way, but they can't put their
heads in the sand.
"THOSE COPY machines give peo-
ple a real weapon, and they've been
using it indiscriminately. They'd better
get with it and start reading what they
print," Stephenson said. Moreover, he
added, systematic duplication is not
covered by "fair use."
Forbes contended that scientists who

'L' ^ . t

If interested-
Call 764-0561,
or come to our offices
at 420 Maynard
(Next to SAB)

Med schools set for insurance aid

(Continued from Page 1)
surance for its physicians, "because it
(the school) doesn't have its own facili-
ty."
BECAUSE THE amount of money
required in each of the school's reserve

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS FOR 1978-79
INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS
MONDAY, JANUARY 16-WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1978
WEST QUAD-January 16, Monday, 7:00 P.M.-Dining Room No. 1
OXFORD-January 16, Monday, 7:00 P.M.-Seeley Lounge
BARBOUR-NEWBERRY-January 16, Monday, 8:00 P.M.-Barbour Living Room
ALICE LLOYD-January 17, Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Pilot Office
COUZENS-January 17, Tuesday, 7:00 P.M.-Living Room
STOCKWELL-January 17, Tuesday,;5:00 P.M.-Main Lounge
EAST QUAD-January 16, Wednesday, 6:30 P.M.-Room 126
W mof t- .u a fftie

I

R$dr$nand Ashram
is now offering
Beginning courss in
meditation & Kundalini Yoga
BEGINNING CLASSES every Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday at 5:30
FULL CLASS at 6:30
995-5483

I

funds is based on past suits, Wiener
said he is not sure what effect the law
will have on WSU. "It should be possi-
ble for us to provide a pool mechanism.
Whether it will be more or less (expen-
sive), no one can tell."
But Wiener feels the implementation
of the new system could help the school
in other ways.
"I've gone over the content of the bill,
and it is going to be quite a help to us. I
think it's going to be a major improve-
ment in our ability to recruit people into
a medical school environment."
Each of the schools, if they are to par-
ticipate in the new system, must submit

an official estimate of this year's losses
to the governor. None of the schools
have arrived at an official figure yet.
The National Safety Council, based in
Chicago, is a nongovernmental, non-
profit, public service organization
dedicated to safety education and the
development and . implementation of
accident prevention programs reaching
every segment of American life.
Hey Baby...
going my way?
find out!
Advertise in the
Daily Classifieds
,under
Transportation.

"Free Speech for-Those
We Despise Most"
A talk by aUwa

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan