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January 13, 1978 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1978-01-13

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own

Ski Venture
Cross Country Skiing
offers

Page 2-Friday, January 13, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Ed., Law, Business
schools seek deans

Mont. Sen. Metcalf
dies at home at 66

5 GROOMED TRAILS
MOONLIGHT TOURS
LESSONS,

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GROUP PARTY RATES
STUDENT DISCOUNTS WEEKDAYS WITH I.D.
GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS:
CALL AND SCHEDULE YOUR EVENING NOW!

By DAN OBERDORFER
In a trio of campus races to find new
deans, the Law School is coming down
the home stretch, the School of Educa-
tion's search committee is eyeing its re-
maining candidates, and the Business.
School's search is barely around the
first turn.
The Law School search committee
recommended four names to President
Robben Fleming and Vice President for
Academic Affairs Harold Shapiro earl-
ier this week, Shapiro said yesterday.
Neither Shapiro nor search committee
chairman Prof. FrancisAllen would
disclose a list of the finalists.
AFTER REVIEWING the candi-
dates' qualifications themselves, Flem-
ing and Shapiro will pass on their
recommendations to the Regents within
the next month and a half, Shapiro said.
"I would be hopeful we could have an
appointment in either this month or the
next," said Allen. The slot has opened
up because Dean Theodore St. Antoine

LESLIE GOLF COURSE *
.p Traver Rd..
PI mrtth Rd.

ANN ARBOR
Ope Daily
668-9011

is vacating his post to return to teach-
ing.
The searches to fill holes being left by
School of Education Dean Wilbur Cohen
and School of Business Administration
Dean Floyd Bond, who are both nearing
65, the mandatory retirement age, are
not as far along. Cohen will retire in
April, Bond in December.
OF 125 CANDIDATES originally con-
sidered by the Education School's sear-
ch committee, only 10 or 11 remain, ac-
cording to Prof. Joseph Payne, commit-
tee chairman.
One of the candidates, Martin Haber-
man, Dean of the Division of Urban
Outreach at the University of Wiscon-
sin-Milwaukee, will meet with students
today between 3 and 4 p.m. in Room
1211 of the Education School. He will
meet with faculty also.
Hendrik Gideonse, dean of the Col-
lege of Education and Home Economics
at the University of Cincinnati, will
visit the campus Monday. Payne says
each of the finalists has been invited to
visit with faculty and students over the
next few weeks.
"THEY ARE COMING here to look at
us to see if they want to come to
Michigan, and we'want to see if we
want to put them on our list," Payne
said. He said he expects to make
recommendations to Shapiro by early.
February.
Professor Paul McCracken of the
Business School search committee says
his group is "beginning now to narrow
down ... a gross list" containing two
pages of deanship candidates. He said
he hopes to make a recommendation
some time in the spring.
"We are under slightly less pressure
because Dean Bond is planning to
carry on through the end of this (calen-
dar) year," he said.

HELENA, Mont. (AP)-Sen. Les
Metcalf, a publicity-shunning
Democrat who spent.17 quiet years in
the Senate, was found dead at his apar-
tment in Helena yesterday. He was 66.
Metcalf, who had announced that he
would retire at the end of his term in
1979, held a key vote on President Car-
ter's energy plan and his death could
amean a pricing policy more favorable
to the oil and gas industry.
HELENA POLICE Chief Jack
Williams said Metcalf's son Jerry, a
state legislator, found the body.
"Investigating officers found the
senator dead in bed, and it appeared
that he died of natural causes,"
Williams said.
A spokesperson in Metcalf's
Washington office said the senator had
a heart condition and had been in poor
health for several years.
WILLIAMS SAID Jerry Metcalf told
officers he had driven his father to
Helena Wednesday night from Wallace,
Idaho, hometown of his wife of 40 years,
Donna. Mrs. Metcalf was still in.
Wallace, according to a staff member
in Metcalf's Helena office.
Metcalf, who has been described as
the senator no one knew, was elected to
the Senate in 1960 and re-elected in 1966
and 1972. He was best known nationally
for supporting additions to the coun-
try's designated wilderness areas.
But Metcalf was also a member of a
House-Senate conference committee on
energy and his death could break the
congressional deadlock over Carter's
energy program.

Metcalf

FROM "YOUR LOCAL PHOTOFINISHER"
4 HOUR

THE 18 SENATE members of the
committee have been equally divided
for weeks on the issue of natural gas
pricing, which has blocked passage of
the rest of the plan.
Metcalf voted with the nine senators
supporting continued controls in op-
position to Republicans and
Democrats from oil and gas-producing
states.
At his news conference Thursday.
Carter, who was not aware of Metcalf's
death, acknowledged that the 9-9 Senate
deadlock was responsible for stalling
his energy program.
The House approved Carter's pricing
formula and it is not certain how House
conferees would react to a break in the
Senate deadlock.

SLI

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Daily Official Bulletin

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 1978
Daily Calendar*
WUOM: Technology & Democracy, Marshall
McLuhan, Dur. U-Toronto's Center for Culture and
Technology, "Take Today: Hardware Goes Soft,"
discusses phonetic alphabet, and effect of a
simultaneous information environment, 10:05 a.m.
Guild House: Soup and sandwich luncheon, .50c,
Jean Carlberg "Women in China", 802 Monroe, noon.
Music School faculty recital, "French Harpsichord
Music, 17th, 18th Centuries" SM Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
General Notices
"New Research on Women III: Work, Family
Roles and Support Systems," the subject of a con-
ference on Tuesday, January 17th, 1978 from 9-5 p.m.
The all day meeting is sponsored by CEW.
During the morning session, panelists will present
papers looking at working women from five diverse
perspectives: internal influences on women's career
goals, racial differences in why women work, and
how work and familiy roles are integrated,' vge and
class differences as related to the kinds of jobs
women obtain, differences in values and social com-
petence across three generations of women.
Speakers are: Jacqueline Parsons, Ph. D.
(developmental psychologict), Karen Paige, Ph.D.
(social psychologist), Joyce Beckett, Ph.D. (School
of Social Work), Mary Corcoran, Ph.D. (political
scientist), Greg Duncan, Ph.D. (economist) Toni An-
tonucci, Ph.D. (developmental psychologist).
Research in progress will be presented during the
following sessions: 1:30-3:30-Women and Careers
Across the Life Cycle, Susan Cameron, oderator;
3:15-4:45-Women and Support Systems Across the
Life Cycle, Toni Antonucci, moderator; and Working-
Women and Their Families, Jane Hood moderator;
4:45-5:00-closing session.
The conference is free and open to the public. This
conference has been supported by a Ford Foundation
Grant. For further information, contact Susan
Golden at CEW, (313) 764-6555.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200SAB 764-7456
Interviewing at Career Planning and Placement;
Jan. 17: Manufacturers,, Nat'l Bank, Battelle
Columbus Lab., Nat'l CSS.
Jan. 17:.Leo Burnett, Abraham & Straus.
Jan. 19: Indiana U. Hosp., Libby Owens Ford
Jan. 20: Allstate Insurance
Jan. 23:,Jones & Laughlin Steel Co, Action-Peace
Corps-Vista.
Jan. 24: Action-Peace Corps-Vista, Chem. Ab-
stracts Service.
Jan. 25: The Proctor & Gamble Distributing Co.
Indland Steel Co., Control Data Corp., Action-Peace
Corps-Vista.
Jan. 26: K-Mart Apparel, BASF Wayandotte Corp.
Jan. 27: Rike's, Data Resources Corp.
Students interested in the fields of modern sur-
veying and cargography: American Congress in.
Surveying and Mapping is offering the Keuffeld&
Esser Fellowship in Surveying and Car.
tography-2,000 & Wild Heerbrugg Geodetic'
Fellowship-$3,000. Regulations and applications:
forms are available at CP&P.
The Int'l Development Research Centre is offering.
awards for Canadian graduate students working in'
fields related to international development.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 7634117
International BusinessdInternship, Zurich, Swi
zerland. Liberal Arts and Business majors, grads;
and undergrads. Details available. Up to 12
academiccredits given.
INTERVIEWS:
Camp Maplehurst, Mi. /Coed: Will interview Mon.,
Jan. 16, 1 to 5. General camp positions open-water-
front, arts, crats, athletics, etc. Register by phone or
in person. Age 20 and up.
Wrights Lake Scout Reservation, Boy Scouts: Will
interview Weds. Jan. 18, 1 to 5. Openings include
waterfront (WSI). and Rifle instr. Details available
Age. (20-21).
Merriott Inns of Gr. Am.:Will interview Thurs.,
Jan.19 and Fri., Jan. 20, 9 to 5. Looking for magmnt.
supervisory personnel. Details available. Register
by phone or in person.
Commonwealth of Virginia, Personnel & Training:
Grad. and undergrads. Select your own agen-
cy-planning/budget, mental health, retardation
higher ed., personnel training. Further details
available and appts
Environmental Protection Agency, AA, Mi. Must
have completed sophomore year in mech. engr.
related fields. Details and apps. available.

Now

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ENGINEERS

CHEMICAL

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL
* INDUSTRIAL

January 19,1978
a representative of CHAMPION INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION will be interviewing graduating students for positions which can
develop into exciting careers in one of America's most far sighted and rewarding industries. Forest Products.
Champion International Corporation is a major forest products company, a pioneer in the building materials, paper and paper
packaging businesses. With nearly 50.000 employees the company's 1977sales were approximately $3.6 billion.
There are more than 400 Champion International facilities in the United States and Canada and it is reasonably certain you have
had an association with one or more of our products in the paper, paper packaging or building materials areas.

Our building materials business, domestically represented by
Champion Building Products. is in itself a large business: 1977
sales of $1.1 billion. This unit of our company is an important
producerand marketerof plywood, lumber, hardboard and particle-
board. These products are used in both industrial and construction
markets and for furniture and home improvement projects. Our
building materials might well be used as sheathing, studs or siding
in your home. as underlayment for your floors, shelving or panel-
ing in your family room.
And it's hard to get too far from our Champion Papers products,
too. This division of Champion International had sales of over
$1 billion in 1977 Champion Papers is a major producer of writ-
ing. printing and business papers, the second largest manufac-
turer of milk cartons. a producer last year of more than 5'/2

billion envelopes and the country's largest wholesaler of office
products.a
Our paper packaging business is represented by Hoerner
Waldorf, a large (over $500 million last year) producer of cor-
rugated containers, consumer packages, grocery, multi-wall and
shopping bags. We package boats, refrigerators, toys, taco shells,
detergents, cereals, groceries, dishes, pet food and thousands of
other items.
Behind all the products we make is the tree. We have 3.4 million
acres of forestlands in the United States. Champion Timberlands
is a separate division responsible for intensively managing these
lands to assure a continuing supply of timber, and for supplying
our current needs for paper, paper packaging and build-
ing materials.

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