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November 22, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-22

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Wednesday, November 22, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wens_. oeme 2,17_TEMCHGNDALaghe

CIII" A
TUES/WED.
THROUGH A
GLASS DARKLY
1961. Dir Ingmar Bergman
One of this director's most suc-
cessful films-gloomy, intense,
yet more human and less alle-
gorical than other examples of
his woork. A young woman's
descent into madness and her
family's inability to help due to
lack of "touch".
THANKSGIVING BREAK--
NEXT SHOW:
MONDAY, NOV. 27
Man For All
Seasons
Dir. Fred Zinneman, 1966.
With Paul Scofield as Thomas
More. Popular success film with
qua!ities.
Architecture
Auditorium
7 & 9 p.m. 75c

An evening with
Itzhak Perlman

A phrase .. .
a tickling of the mind

By ROY CHERNUS
ITZHAK PERLMAN, Violin with
Samuel Sanders, Piano. Tuesday,
Nov. 21, Hill Auditorium. Choral
Union Series of the University
Musical Society. Sonata No. 3 in G
major, Op. 30-Beethoven; Sonata
No. 1 in A minor, Op. 105-Schu-
mann; Sonata for Violin and Piano
-Ravel; Three Caprices (No. 5, 17,
24)-Paganini; Legende, Scherzo-
Tarantelle-Wieniawski.
It is fitting that a virtuoso of
the highest degree should per-
form a recital of worksperfectly
tailored to display astounding
virtuosity. Such was the case of
violinist Itzhak Perlman's recital
last night.
Don't entertain any common
notions of virtuosity here as
mostly overindulged in spell-
binding technique and energetic
bravura for show only and
skimpy in solid, substantial
music. Perlman combined super-
latives of both in a diverse and
uniquely exciting program.
For anyone so blessed as to
have been cursed by Perlman's
sorcery, I can only reaffirm what
has already been established by
his years of top standing. That
is simply perfection. In every-
thing: sensitive interpretation,
flawless technique, and excellent
selection of repetoire which ex-
hibits unbelieveable and mostly
obscure capabilities of the violin.
The program, with the exclu-
sion of the Ravel work, was Ro-
mantic in mood. There are many
who assert the true soul of the

violin and epitome of its expres-
sion to lie in this style of music.
After Perlman's concert, I
would be quite surprised if any
present would assert otherwise.
These works from the first of
the Beethoven throughout the
evening demonstrated the magic
Perlman executed with the wand
in his right hand. His virtuosity
consisted in the enormous vari-
ance in sound textures from
coarse, choppy punctuations to
flowing passages which almost
breathed, to powerful and intense
statements. Perlman's violin sung
themes in satin smoothness and
delicacy and throbbing vibratos.
The Paganini and Wieniawski
works drew overwhelming ova-
tions from the standing audience
in their inhuman technical diffi-
culty which Perlman executed
without so much as a blink. But
they lacked nothing in music
either.
The Ravel work was distinct
from the others in its haunting
and surreal dissonance. Perlman
showed himself versatile in
changing the passionate, throb-
bing emotion of his violin to a
lighter more transparent sound
which was delightful. This work's
last movement was in the more
technical showy vein of the
others. Sanders likewise showed
himself an adept and sensitive
musician. He was a perfect ac-
companist to Perlman's violin
having a light touch (especially
perfect in the Ravel) and strong,
versatile interpretations in a
flawless technique like Perlman.
A perfect duo and a perfect ac-
complishment!

Itzhak Perl man

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS
the aliman brothers band

rCU iT'U;RECA eI DAR
FILMS-Phych. 171 Film Series features The Sixties and
Afrikaner in the UGLI Multi-purpose room this after-
noon at 4; AA Film Co-op shows Truffaut's The Wild
Child tonight in Aud. A, 7, 8:45; Cinema Guild presents
Bergman's Through A Glass Darkly in Arch. Aud., tonight
at 7, 9:05.
DRAMA-Ann Arbor Junior Theater presents Moliere's The
Frantic Physician this weekend at Huron High Audi-
torium at 7:30 (Fri.), 1:30 and 4 (Sat., Sun.)
DANCE-Hungarian Workshop given by Csabia Palfi will be
held at Barbour Gym Fri., 8-11 p.m., charge.
ART-The Bachelor of Fine Arts show ends tonight, 5, at the
Union Gallery; Lantern Gallery presents a one-man show
of works by Otmar Alt, young German painter and print-
maker (Runs until Nov. 30).
WEEKEND BARS AND MUSIC-Blind Pig, Koko Taylor (Fri.,
Sat.); Golden Falcon, The Fifth Revolution (Fri., Sat.);
Mackinac Jack's Blooziana (Fri., Sat., Sun.); Mr. Flood's
Party, Tim Carr and Friends (Fri., Sat.); Bimbo's on the
Hill, Gabriel (Fri., Sat.); Ann Arbor People's Ballroom,
Mojo Boogie Band and Cain (Fri., Sat.); Bimbo's, Gas-
lighters (Fri., Sat., Sun.); Del Rio, Armando's Jazz Group
(Sun.); Rubaiyat, Iris Bell Adventure (Fri., Sat., Sun.).
** *
Information concerning happenings to be included in
Culture Calendar should be sent to the Arts Editor c/o
The Daily.
WED.-THURS. at 9:00!
JIAMES CHANEY \
and the ALL STARS
FRI.-SAT.-SUN. at 9:00
BLOOZIANA
..--

A
R
T
S

By ROB HORWITZ
To Diane Wakowski, her poetry
is a means of recreating mo-
ments, often "inconsequencial"
in action but of special personal
significance. Yesterday, in the
UGLI multipurpose room, she
read. with a sing-song sort of
lyricism that fits these events
into the fairytale world of her
mind.
And from the little girl who
read fairy tales,
I have grown into a woman
in them, the one who steps
magically out
of those fragrant orange peels
into your house,
Diane Wakowski grew up in
California, home of oranges and
motorcycle gangs, two subjects
deeply romanticized in her poe-
try. She now resides mostly in
New York City and is teaching
at the University of Virginia.
She opened the reading with a
poem she always reads-a poem
particularly close to her, "Blue
Morning" .. .
Blue of the heap of beads
poured into her breasts
and clacking together in her
elbows;
blue of the silk
that covers lily-town at night;
blue of the teeth
that bite cold toast
and shatter on the streets;
Written in a semi-automatic
form, that is with little written
r ev is i on, Wakowski's poetry
moves in a stream of conscious-
ness mode. She finds Ginsberg
and surrealism great influences
in this respect.
The poems must be read aloud
for the tension of the imagery
to make full impact. Certain im-
ages - boots, motorcycles, dia-
monds - hold particular signifi-
cance in her work, anthropomor-
phized through their constant
though varied use, as in "Love
Letter Postmarked Van Beethov-
en" from her recent book Motor-
cycle Betrayal Poems.
your large body
with its mustaches that sub-
stitute for love
andits knowledge of motor-
cycle mechanics that sub-
stitutes
for loving me;
Why are you interested in

0

my beautiful little engine?
Her poems run quite long and
due to her method, occasionally
hit upon some preachy, trite
lines. But the lyrical flow built
upon repetition and filled with
evocative i m a g e r y gives the
poetry a fine vitality.
Her "chiding poems" are most
susceptible to criticism. They are
packed with rusty, dross images
a la Ginsberg's "Howl." But
these images seem awkward and
out of place in Wakowski's fairy-
land.
Her poetry is at its best in, but
of course, her childhood memo-
ries. Take the title poem of her
latest book, Smudging:
And in my head
those red-hot rocks
shake down into a bed of
coals, oranges roll off the
shelves,
amber sticks on the roof of
my mouth,
honey glistens in glass jars,
the combs full of music,
With a wealth of imagery and
wit, Diane Wakowski creates a
poetry that spekas to the playful
emotions in us all.

Innovative arts

By JEAN LOVE
The Pyramid Gallery presented
last Saturday the second in a
series of eight art events co-
ordinated by David Rubello and
presented by University A&D
students.
Black lights illuminated dang-

ling white strings and a hanging
mirrored ball cast wild light re-
flections on the ceiling amidst
"eery" music-creating an unus-
ual atmosphere.
The music presented was a
rather odd harmony of alto sax,
electric and bass guitar, violin,
-drums and flute. It was more
than obviously improvised, al-
most uncomfortably unorganized.
The combination of lighting and
music provided a creative show
of artistic unity, combining both
visual and audio experience.
Thenext show in the series
will be on Dec. 2, and will be a
slide and music show. These
events will take place on Satur-
days from now until spring at
the Pyramid Gallery, 109 N. Main
St.

Butch Dicky Jai Johnny Greg Berry
Trucks Betts Johansen Allman Oakley
Despite the tragic death of bassist Berry Oakley, THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND
wish to keep their commitment to the Ann Arbor audience and will perform as
scheduled SATURDAY, DEC. 9, CRISLER ARENA, 7-12 p.m. Also on the bill: Dr.
John, and The Rockets. Gen. Adm. $4.00 now MICH IGAN UNION DAILY 1 1-5:30
p.m.; SATURDAYS 1-4 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving Day. Friday, open 1-4 p.m.
only. Sorry, no personal checks.
This concert sold 2,000 seats in 21/ days ... Don't WAIT
STARTS WEDNESDAY
"'LADY SINGS THE BLUES'
A RED HOT SMASH1."
-Gene Shalit, NBC-TV
"'LADY SINGS THE BLUES' IS A "ONE OF THE BIGGEST AND BRIGHTEST
MOVIE-MOVIE THAT IS A JOY TO WALLOW SURPRISES OF THE MOVIE YEAR
IN WITH LUMP IN THROAT AND A SONG IS DIANA ROSS!"
IN YOUR HEART! DIANA ROSS MAKES HER -Bruce Williamson, Playboy
SCREEN DEBUT AS BILLIE HOLIDAY-AND A "A FILM THAT BOTH MOVES AND
LOVELY ONE IT IS!" ENTERTAINS! DIANA ROSS HAS SO IMMERSED
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine HERSELF IN THE BILLIE HOLIDAY CHARACTER
"DIANA ROSS DELIVERS THE KIND OF THAT HER TOTAL CONVICTION SUFFUSES THE
PERFORMANCE THAT WINS OSCARS! ENTIRE PICTURE. HER RENDITION OF
SHE IS UNCANNILY EFFECTIVE IN CONVEYING 'GOOD MORNING, HEARTACHE' IS ABOUT AS
THE ESSENCE OF BILLIE HOLIDAY'S HAUNTING AND HEARTBREAKING AS
SINGING STYLE. IT'S A FITTING AND LASTING BILLIE HOLIDAY'S, WHICH IS
TRIBUTE TO BOTH THEIR TALENTS!" NO MEAN TRIBUTE!"
-Peter Travers, Reader's Digest (EDU) -Arthur Knight, Saturday Review
"DIANA ROSS IS NOTHING SHORT "YOU CAN ADD DIANA ROSS'
OFDAZZLING ... PLAYING WITH NAME TO OUR LIST OF DEFINITE
ALTERNATING MOODS THAT ARE OSCAR CONTENDERS FOR'72!
SENSITIVE, CHILDLIKE, VULNERABLE, BILLY DEE WILLIAMS IS A SURE SHOT
SASSY AND PITIFUL. IT'S QUITE FOR A BEST SUPPORTING
A SHOWCASE FOR A MOVIE DEBUT OSCAR NOMINATION!"
AND SHE MEETS THE -Rona Barrett, Syndicated Columnist
CHALLENGE ADMIRABLY!" L D
-Rex Reed, N.Y. Daily News
SINGS DIAL
THE 662-6264
BLUES
PARAMOUNT ACTUPES CORP1CATONOnd BEW GOPY eset DIANA ROSS IN LADY SINGS THE BLUES'

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Eddie's Father
50 Fintsones
56 Maggie and the Beautiful
Machine
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 Jeannie
50 Gligan's Island
56 Making Things Grow
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Zoom
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Family Classics
7 Wild Kingdom
9 All Outdoors
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Consumer Game
8:00 2 Carol Burnett
4 Adam-12
7 Paul Lynde
9 Burt Bacharach
50 Dragnet/
56 How Do We Get From
Here to There?
8:30 4 Cool Million
7 Julie Andrews
50 Merv Griffin
56 Playhouse New York
9:00 2 Medical Center
9 News-Don West
9:30 7 Movie
9 Selling Out
10:00 2 Cannon
4 Search
9 Tenth Decade
50 Perry Mason
56 Soul!
11:00 24 79 News
50 Mancini Generation
11:20 9 Nghtbeat
11:30 2 Movie
"Flaming Star." (1960)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Let's Celebrate
50 Movie
"Harpy" (1971)
12:00 9 Movie
"Tammy and the Millionaire"
1:00 4 7 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Only the Valiant" (1951)
3:00 2 News
wcbn today
fm 89.5
9:00 Morning After Show
1200 Progressive Rock
4:00 Folk
7:00 Rock & Roll Retrospective
8:00 Rhythm & Blues
11:00 Progressive Rock (runs 'sil 3)
Bowie hijacked
RCA Records announced this
week the heisting of a 20 by 30
inch Mnountd picture of David
Bowie.
The large picture once deco-
rated the entrance to the RCA
Recording Studios at 110 West
44th St., New York.
According to Martin Last, RCA
Records' Photo Editor: "The
picture was up there for about a
week, then one day it was miss-
ing. We have no idea where it
went to, but all possible leads
are being checked into."
In the meantime, Last has or-
dered another deluxe dry mount-
ed picture to replace the stolen
one.
It is not true as was originally
conjectured, that an armed guard
will be placed next to the new
picture. H o w e v e r television,
cameras will monitor the picture
and a guard will patrol the area
at unspecified times.
GROWING
DARKNESS!.
TONS OF WASTE
ADDED TO U.S. AIR:
153;MILLION.
19661
I

217 SASHLEN?

F2 PR&2 AM

Starts
THURS.
The show YOU
ASKED FOR

DIAL 8-6416

.4W~

HOLIDAY
SPECIAL
Double Bill!
May well be
the mast
beautiful film
ever made.
-Newsweek

NOTICE: Due to Thanksgiving Holi-
day Break, there will be an extended
leadline for display advertising for
the Tues., November 28 DAILY. The
deadline for ads up to a quarter
page for November 28 will be 12
noon, Monday, November 27. Ads
over a quarter page have to be in
by Wednesday, November 22.
-THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Display Adv. Dept.
Sto itsDIAL
Starts 665-6290
TODAY Shows at
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
. .a -
I A E.

":t
(t

Elvira
Mad ahn
- ('~LTc And

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