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November 22, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-22

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 22, 1972-

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, November 22, 1972

N. Viets, U.S.
continue meets
By AP and Reuters
PARIS-U.- S. Presidential envoy Henry Kissinger and
North Vietnamese negotiator Le Duc Tho met late into the
night yesterday, in an attempt to put the final touches to a
Vietnam peace settlement.
The two men met for the second time of their current
round of talks in the Paris suburb of Gif-sur-yvette. For the
first in their three years of meetings, no mystery surrounded
the site of their talks, and journalists crowded around the
villa where the meeting was held.
The meeting was punctuated by laughter and joking on
the part of Kissinger and Tho,
suggesting that the discus-
sions may be going well be-
hind the total news blackout.
Kissinger was ordered by Presi-
dent Nixon to fly to Brussels today
to confer with Indonesian President
sessiSuharto on progress in the peace
talks and arrangements to super-
vise the hoped-for Indochina cease-
fire.
Indonesia, along with Canada,
Poland, and Hungary has agreed to
GENEVA (M)-The second phase in principle to contribute to a
of the Strategic Arms Limitation peace - keeping force that would
Talks (SALT) between the U.S. supervise a cease-fire.
and the Soviet Union began yes-
terday. In Vietnamn, the government ra-
reddio said yesterday that chances for
saingt e on sent a essage a halt in the fighting appeared+
saingrstwth the hopess of ltanh mmnn and warned the nation
kid" rest with the success of theo be ready for a political struggle
sessonsagainst Communism.
The opening round of the secondI
phase, called SALT II, is likely to "When the shooting is over an-
last until shortly before Christmas. other struggle will appear, andI
It is designed to lay groundwork the South Vietnamese people will
for further negotiations that could have to fight hard if they still
last for the duration of the five- want to live in freedom and de-t
year interim SALT agreement mocracy," the official Saigon radio
signed by Nixon last May in Mos- said.
COW. The broadcast also revealed thatf
That agreement was the culmina- special committees were being es-I
tion of the SALT.I talks that began tablished and political action train-I
in 1969, and resulted in a per- ing teams were being sent!
manent ceiling on anti-ballistic mis- throughout the country to prepareI
siles and a five-year freeze on the the people for anti-communist ac-
total of long-range offensive sys- tivities.j
tems.

Indians plan protest
at Thanksgiving site
PLYMOUTH, Mass. (R) -While tants. It is a private, nonprofit
costumed "Pilgrims" renew a organization.
350-year-old Thanksgiving Day ob- At a wharf near the Plymouth
servance here tomorrow, a group Rock shrine is a copy of the May-
of Indians plans a symbolic fast flower, and it is there that the
in what they call a "day of protest fast is expected .to take
mourning." place.
"As most Americans sit downl Freeman said the point should
to a traditional Thanksgiving bermade that Indian'and white
meal," the United Americans of man got along very well in Ply-
New England said in a state- mouth from the time the May-
ment, "these Indians are fasting flower landed there in 1620 until
to mourn the loss of Indian life, a bloody war fought with the
land and culture, which for them Wampanoag Chief King Philip in
began with the arrival of the Pil- 'the early 1670s.
grims." Massasoit, father of Chief King
The group organizing this year's Philip, signed a peace treaty with
protest said it will include repre- the Pilgrims soon after they land-
sentatives from the Wampanoag, ed, promising not to harm them
APPhto Narragansett, Passamaquoddy, as long as he lived. Later mem-
Chippewa a n d Rappahannock pers of his tribe taught the Pil-
Chipewa n Rapahanockgrims how to grow corn.
tribes, all Northeastern tribes. im how torow crn
"I thinkitsamsunouae In 1970, after a ceremony at the
"Irthofktit's a most unfortunate Plymouth Rock, a number of In-
turn of things," said David B. Free- dian protesters went aboard the
man, director of "Plimoth" Plan- Mayflower II, climbed the rigg-
tation, "I feel very strongly in ing and threw some mannikins
favor of Indians getting together overboard. Officials estimated the
bu. t thissort of thing s damage at only $100 to $200, but
very disruptive." asked police to remove the pro-
'As far as action is concerned, testers.
it should be in Washington," Free-
man said. "Foscusing attention
on a little place like this doesn't °
seem to be of much value to the
Indians. Of course, that's just one
man's opinion."~
He added thatthehplantation's A PERSO
only concession to the holiday is jcA P R 0
the preparation of more food than Q
usaul, which is offered as true
Pilgrim fare to any visitors.
Plimoth Plantation is a re-cre-
ation of Plymouth as it appeared
in 1627, with costumed workers
cooking food, making barrels, tend-
ing livestock and doing other jobs .,.'..
performed by the original inhabi-

.
.j
i
i

HAPPY
TH ANKSGI VING!
JAY, -AVE, CHET,
AND HAROLD
U-M BARBERS
& STYLISTS
Open Today Til 5:15 p.m.
V
0
Eskimo
Art Carvings
and
Engravings 0
INDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard St.
Join The Daily

AP Photo
HENRY KISSINGER lunches at a Paris restaurant yesterday with an "unidentified girl."
Israel, Syria ight over Golan

x

By the AP, UPI and Reuters
TEL AVIV-Israeli and Syrian
tanks and planes waged a furious,
eight-hour battle along the Golan
Heights cease-fire line yesterday
-the worst outbreak of fighting
in the area since 1970.
Both sides issued conflicting
reports about the conflict, which
ended shortly before nightfall.
An Israeli military spokesman
claimed Israeli jets shot down
six Syrian MIG 21 fighters and
destroyed 15 Syrian tanks. In
Damascus, Syrianiauthorities re-
ported the downing of two Is-
raeli aircraft, and the destruction
of 14 Israeli tanks and at least
five artillery batteries.
The fighting was sparked by an
Israeli air raid on a Syrian army
position and three Arab guerrilla
bases seven miles inside Syria.
It came in reprisal for guerrilla
raids against Israeli settlements
in the occupied Golan Heights.
Syria replied with artillery and
Read Daily
Classifieds

tanks, and both sides traded gun-
fire while dogfights between the
rival airforces swirled overhead.
The Israelis considered the sit-
uation serious enough to warrant
a visit by Defense Minister
MosheDayan, who toured army
positions and civilian settlements.
The violent fighting along the
Golan Heights ceasefire line
raises some delicate questions
about Syria's relations with its
closest allies-Egypt, Libya and
the Soviet Union.
Syria is linked with Egypt and
Libya in the year-old Federation
of Arab Republics, and all three
members have pledged to come
to each others assistance in the
event of an attack on any one of
them.
This is not a formal obligation
under their constitution, which
only says a member government
may inform the federal authori-
ties about any internal or exter-
nal threat "so that they might
take the essential measures with-
in their jurisdiction to preserve
security and order."
But last September, after a
large Israeli attack on Lebanon

and amid fears of one on Syria,
the federation's ministerial coun-
cil met in Cairo and announced
that any attack on a member
state would be considered an at-
tack on the federation as a whole
-and would be repelled.
There has been no suggestion
yet that the Israeli attacks on
Syria have yet reached the stage
of calling for a joint federal
counter-attack.
But as each exchange becomes
more serious, the prospect must
loom larger in the strategic think-
ing of the Arabs.

NAL GIFT 0
The monogrammed
CIRCLE PIN 6
is a campus tradition

4A'
if5T

Although the current meetings
are mainly to set the stage for
more talks, the opening round
could revive issues that brought
much discussion in SALT I.
The Soviets might again raise
the subject of the presence of U.S.
ntclear equiped aircraft in Europe.
In turn, the Americans could insist
that Soviet intermediate-range mis-
siles pose a threat to U.S. allies
on the continent.
The United States also might re-
new its suggestion that proposed
talks on mutual and balanced force
reductions could provide a better
forum than SALT for such Europe-
related issues.
The first meeting of SALT II
lasted about 95 minutes. American
officials said the session was
"characterized by the same degreeI
of concentration and seriousness"
that prevailed during the earlier
talks.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan.tNews phone: 764-0562. second
Class postage paid at. Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-1
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(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesdayl
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Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign),

Join us
Thanks,
Dinner
Wed., fro
(we'll be
all day T
)imWIIL

for a
-giving
Special
m 11:00
closed
Thurs.)
FOODS Y&SYAU fW

many sizes and finishes to
./3TRI choose from
STERLING,GOLD FILLED,
OR 14 KARAT GOLD
No charge for engraving ^
from $4.00
0
16 Nickels Arcade
for beautiful jewelry
STOP IN AND BROWSE
N.,. a->. oso ,osc t

r

ac XUEEEXE5

~)5& SWTCSZ fWA) OP*' T1&-7915~

womw

L

WEDNESDAY is
SINGLES NIGHT
SHE

I

"A BRILLIANT FILM-STUNNING.!

It showers intelligence on parched lips, reviving faith in posi-
tive artistry and sophisticated cinema. It is a moral comment on
the total degeneracy of the British upper class. The shafts are
aimed both high and low and hit with a shattering accuracy.
Rare indeed is the perfection a n d polish provided off screen
and on. Even rarer is the complexity of humor, the easy slide
from slam-bang-bladder to slithering stiletto to music-hall

A~L'!N BUJCK PBO6uCDG
PETER O'TOOLE
ALASTAIR SIM
ARTHUR LOWE

"UNADULTERATED

THE
4111 ULING CLASS
HARRYANDREWS -CORAL BROWNE MICHAEL BRYANT GRAHAM CROWDEN NIGR.GREEN
WILAMMERVYN " CAROLYN SEYMOUR - JAMES VILLIERS ~. EmPERJEOM .wos.aJULES BUCK&
NUTTINESSI"
-Susan Stark, Detroit Free Press
uch intensity that it may
unt memory. O'Toole be-
funnv disturbina. finally

"Peter O'Toole-a performance of s
trouble sleep as surely as it will hau
ins whereo nthar ntorsst nn He is

i

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