100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1972 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, Oct6ber 8,'l 972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pra Fie

Sunday, October 8,1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

* 5 3 Wre

m

..

nglis

e

rtme

erin s

Winter

1973

FOR PREREGISTRATION AND REGISTRATION

/

123 SECS. 1-27 FR. COMP.
See time schedule

(STAFF)

ENGLISH 150.1 FRESHMAN COMP.-SHAKESPEARE
(BAULAND) M 11

231-10 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY. (WILLSON) TTh 9-10:30
The aim of the course will be to introduce students to a wide
range of poetic forms (i.e., lyric, ballad, ode, etc.) and to en-
courage the growth of taste and discrimination among the readers.
X. J. Kennedy's An Introduction to Poetry (second edition) will be
used as a text; other poems will be dittoed and handed out in
class. Three papers (about 1500-2000 words each), a midsemes-
ter, and final will be assigned.

(Lec.)

282-4 CORE 11: GT ENGL BKS. (WILLSON) MTWTh 11
A survey of major works in English literature from Swift to Yeats.
The course is envisioned as an approach to understanding such
works as Gulliver's Travels and Jude the Obscure, not only in
formal terms but in the context of their times as well. Short
papers (1-2 pages) will be assigned as exercises; there will also
be midsemester and final examinations. The course requires at
least some background knowledge of poetic and narrative forms,
such as the lyric and epic.

For sections see time schedule.
A course in expository writing that uses a selection of plays by
William Shakespeare as the basis for that writing. The lectures
(once a week) will deal with the plays under consideration; the
section meetings will concern themselves with problems of compo-
sition and with close reading of the plays. The aim of the course
is to teach students how to write lucid, forceful, logicaland grace-
ful expository prose at the some time that it offers them on op-
portunity to develop their ability to read carefully and perceptively
in the work of Shakespeare. Plenty of writing; individual confer-
ences. The class will use 5 or 6 plays as our text. Titles from
which final choices will be made: Romeo and Juliet; King Henry
IV, Part One; Twelfth Night; Hamlet; King Lear; Othello; Troilus
and Cressida; The Tempest.
150-10 FR. COMP.-.-SHAKESPEARE. (HAMILTON) W 1 (Lec. )
For sections see time schedule.
Some writing will be asked each week, but it need not always be
a critical discussion of Shakespeare. Students will writes from situ-
ations Shakespeare presents, to other things of this world, and, in
some cases, back toward Shakespeare again. Students will also
keep a journal for a more private kind of writing.
Six plays have been selected with three criteria in mind: to
display some thematic coherence, to sample three of Shakespeare's
major genres (comedy, tragedy and romance), and to range from
early to late in his career as a writer. The plays are Midsummer
Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, Measure for
Measure, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Winter's Tale. All these
plays dramatize love, the situations of love and its effects. The
sonnets and Nothing Like the Sun by Anthony Burgess are sug-
gested as collateral reading.
150-19 FR. COMP.--SHAKESPEARE. (BAKER) F 9 (Lec.)
For sections see time schedule.
English Composition, with six plays of Shakespeare for discussion
and writing: Romeo and Juliet, I Henry IV, Twelfth Night, Ham-
let, Lear, The Tempest. One lecture and two section meetings a
week, with an essay a week, frequently evolved by writing an ex-
temporaneous essay in class one week, and revising and expanding
it the next week. Lectures and discussion focus on Shakespeare as
a writer's writer, in whose plays, among all else, we can see cer-
tain rhetorical principles with skills to be developed in one's own
writing.
GREAT BOOKS 192-1 FRESHMAN HONORS. (KHANNA )
T 1 (Lec.)
Texts: Dante, The Divine Comedy; Cervantes, Don Quixote; Mil-
ton, Paradise Lost; Goethe, Faust,I & i11; The Mahabharata (se-
lections). A detailed reading of these works and some examination
of the cultural and political world from which they emerge. The
Mahabharqte is a great book from outside the Western tradition.
The selections from it should afford both some exposure to a non-
Western philosophical and literary tradition and a fresh perspec-
tive on Western great books.
GREAT BOOKS 201 (LUNN) MWThF 12
GREAT BOOKS 202-1 (SUPER) MWThF 9
The course will use eight writers as a means of studying both lit-
erary techniques and intellectual problems that have concerned
western European writers from 1300 to 1832.. it'will look both
backward and forward-backward to the influence of the classics
studied in the first term, and forward to contemporary problems.
The authors to be read are: Dante, Milton, Machiavelli, Shakes-
peare, Cervantes, Voltaire, Moliere, and Goethe.
GREAT BOOKS 202-2 (KIDDLE) MTWF 10
Great Books 202-2 deals with masterpieces of the. Western World
of the period from the Middle Ages to Modern times. The readings
include: Dante, Divine Comedy; Machiavelli, Prince; More, Utopia;
Cervantes, Don Quixote; Shakespeare, Lear, Coriolanus, Antony
and Cleopatra; Moliere, Miser, Don Juan, Bougeois Gentilhomme;
Milton, Paradise Lost; Voltaire, Candide; Goethe, Faust. Class
discussions.
GREAT BOOKS 202-3 (JONES) MTWF 11
Class discussions on regular assignments from readings of Dante's
Divine Comedy (complete), Don Quixote (Vol. 1), Moliere (a
half-dozen plays), Goethe's Faust and Darwin's Origin of Species
(7 chapters selected). Written reviews following each author,

231-11 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY.
231-12 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY
231-13 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY.
232-1 SHORT STORY & NOVEL.
For sections see time schedule.

TTh 10:30-12
TTh 1-2:30
TTh 2:30-4
(ELKINS) M 12 (Lec.)

282-5
282-6
282-7

CORE 1I: GT ENGL BKS.
CORE 1I: GT ENGL BKS.
CORE 1I: GT ENGL BKS.

(McDOUGAL) MTWF i
(CATHCART) MWThF 2
(LUNN) MWThF 3

232-11 SHORT STORY & NOVEL. (HORNBACK) T 10 (Lec.)
For sections see time. schedule.
A reading of seven novels from a list of nine: Crime and Punish-
ment, The Stranger, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, Decline and Fall,
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, One Day in the Life of
Ivan Denisovich, Invisible Man, God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater,
and David Copperfield. Lectures will try to help students find
ways inside these novels, explaining themes, trying to set up
questions about the "sense" of the whole novel, suggesting rela-
tions among the various novels. In section meetings students will
discuss each novel more closely, attempting among other things to
learn how to read fiction well.

232-21 SHORT STORY & NOVEL.
232-22 SHORT STORY & NOVEL.

T 9 Th 10-12
(BOYS) MWF I

235-1 INTRO TO LIT: DRAMA. (REASKE) M 11 (Lec.)
For sections see time schedule.
The course will be an introduction to both the classical theatre
(from Antigone through the tradional giants Shakespeare, Moli-
ere, Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, etc.) and to the more recent masters
like lonesco, Brecht, and Durrenmatt. The class will read a lot of
plays-probably 18-20--but write relatively little-probably two
papers. A feature of the course will be a full unit on Black Amer-
icon drama in a decade of transition-from Lorraine Hansberry's
1959 Broadway triumph A Raisin in the Sun, to the prize-winning
1969 play. Charles Gordone's No Place to be Somebody and the
more "militant" black revolutionary plays of LeRoi Jones and Ed
Bullens.
235-11 INTRO TO LIT: DRAMA. (CREETH) Th 7-10 PM
A course in the nature. varietv, and theory of comedy and
tragedy. The playwrights studied will be (with one or two possible
changes) : Aristophanes, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Webster, Moliere.,
Congreve, Sheridan, Wilde; and then a selection of moderns, Ibsen,
Shaw, O'Neill. Students will write a report on a play by a con-
temporary dramatist approached in the terms of the course.
Drama of the lost hundred years is seen as essentially a case
of entropy -- the flowing together in every possible way of
qualities once distinct in tragedy or comedy.
Some shortslectures, some reading of theory and criticism,
j but chiefly class discussion of about twelve plays seen, not
as literature, but as scripts for performances in a certain style
for particular kinds of theatre and audience.
269-1 INTRO TO AMERICAN LIT. (DORIA) M 9 (Lec.)
For sections see time schedule.
The focus will be on the writer's relationship to and presentation
of his society. We will read Hawthorne, Thoreau, Whitman, James,
Williams, Faulkner, Hemingway and Eliot.
269-11 INTRO TO AMER LIT. (FRANKLIN) F I (Lec.)
For sections see time schedule.
Hawthorne, Stephen Crane, Fitge.rald, and Nathanael West.
269-21 INTRO TO AMER LIT. (SANDS) MWF 10
Certain authors basic to American literature (Thoreau, Emerson,
Twain, Dickinson, Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens, and W. C. Wil-
'ams) will be studied via concentration on their representative
works. There will be weekly critical papers; there will not be
a long paper of term-paper nature.

282-8 CORE II: GREAT ENGLISH BOOKS (DORIA) MTWTh 4
The poetry will be examined in terms of major intellectual shifts:
Classical to Romantic, Romantic to Victorian, and finally the move
to symbolism. The class will focus on Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, and
Yeats. In discussing the fiction, narrative method and emphasis as
indications of changing areas of interest will be discussed. The
class will read Gulliver's Travels, Tom Jones, Emma, Great Expec-
tations, and Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.
323-1 CREATIVE WRITING. (McINTYRE) TTh 1-2:30
323-2 CREATIVE WRITING. (FORD) TTh 2:30-4
A course in fiction writing which uses as its primary resources
student manuscripts. The course will attempt to comprehend the
work of students writing within traditional genres, as well as
those writing in forms less ruthlessly defined. Students should have
an average interest in reading fiction, as well as some prior
experience in writing fiction. The primary "aim" of the course
will be to develop the student writer's ability to understand and
to put into practice his own intentions in writing fiction. The "aim"
of this class will not be to "teach" stylistic or formalistic norms
for writing fiction. Classes will normally be, conducted as work-
shops, which rely upon discussions of manuscripts by the class as
well as by the instructor. However, individual conferences for
discussing manuscripts will certainly be made available.
To the. extent that student manuscripts do not completely
occupy the class period, there will be discussions of the mechanics
and practicalities of getting work published. This spare time will
also be used to discuss contemporary fiction. The size of the class
is limited to 15 and prospective students should see the. instructor
before enrolling.
325-1 , INTERMED EXPOSITION. (WEISBUCH) MWF 8
As a practical goal, the course will attempt to create a monthly
journal, tentatively titled The Ann Arbor Review of Anything;
which will be composed of student essays and reviews. Students
will be given opportunities to write on topics normally considered
"non-academic" as well as on literary texts and subjects in each
student's academic discipline. This will not be a seminar in
journalism nor a practice-session in the composition of typical
collegqe papers; mare simply, the class will explore the diverse
possibilities of expositorv prose. Weekly essays (3-7 pages)and
no examinations.
325-2 INTERMED EXPOSITION. (REASKE) MWF 9
Texts: Walker Gibson, Persona; Reaske & Knott, eds., Mirrors;
The Autobiography of Malcolm X; James S. Kunen, The Straw-
berry Statement; James Dickey, Deliverance; and other books to be
added.
The class will try its hands at writing varieties of non-fic-
tion - autobiographies, brief essays, literary criticisms, a journal,
reportage -- and, to a lesser extent, a few poems and short
stories. Each student will be required to write about 50 pages, and
the goal of the course is to make the "breakthrough" in writing
which Hemingway described as the discovery of, your own voice
in your writing.
325-3 INTERMED EXPOSITION. (ELKINS) MWF 10
325-4 INTERMED EXPOSITION. (ROBINSON) MWF 12
A course in the practice of writing expository prose and, if a
sufficient number of teaching certificate candidates enroll, in the
teaching of writing. The course will be planned about the interests
and purposes of those who take it. Students will be asked to
develop their own writing assignments and a sequence for those
assignments. Any reading done for the course willbe supportive
of the writing being done, A good deal of time will be spent on
group discussion of papers, though much of the assigned class time
will be spent in individual conferences. If teaching candidates
elect the course, they may expect seminar meetings during class
hours and at irregularly scheduled times for the purpose of dis-
cussing approaches to the teaching of composition, e.g., free
writing a Ia'Ken Macrorie, group writing as recommended in
CourseX, new rhetorical approaches as recommended in Rhetoric:
Discovery and Change, and linguistic approaches. For writers, the
course will consist of writing; for prospective teachers, the course
will, consist of writing and its hows and whys. All students may
expect to write a minimum of 500 words per week.

tributed to the development of a uniquely modernist literature.
Attention will be given to the criticism and representative creative
writing of the fugitive-agrarians and .to the fiction of William
Faulkner, Katherine Anne Porter, Thomas Wolfe, Erskine Caldwell,
and Ellen Glasgow.
343 LITERARY TYPES: SCIENCE FICTION. (RABKIN) MWF 4
The course in science fiction will study examples of this genre
from 1818 to 1970, Students will engage most of the major
themes of science fiction and read some of the all-time best books
in the field. The course, designed for non-majors as well as majors
in English, will require reading the books on the following list,
plus a mid-term, a final, and a final paper (8-10 pp) due in
the next to last week of classes. The class structure will be, within
the limits set by the class population, discussion.
Texts: Kingsley Amis, New Maps of Hell (secondary text);
Isaac Asimov, I-Robot; Ray Bradbury, The Martian Chronicles;
Italo Colvino, Cosmicomics; Arthur C. Clark, Childhood's End;
Michael Frayne, A Very Private Life; John Hersey, The Child
Buyer; Ursula K. LeGuin,. The Left Hand of Darkness; David
Lindsay, A Voyage to Arcturus; Walter M. Miller, Jr., A Canticle
for Leibowitz; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Leo Szilard, The
Voice of the Dolphins; Jules Verne, 20,000 Leagues Beneath the
Sea; Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Slaughterhouse-Five.
350-1 SHAKESPEARE PLAYS. (FELHEIM) TTh 9.10:30
Midsummer Night's Dream; As You Like It; Merchant of Venice;
Twelfth Night; Richard I; Henry IV, Part 1; Henry V; Hamlet;
Othello; Macbeth; Lear; Antony & Cleopatra; Winter's Tale;
Tempest.

350-2 SHAKESPEARE PLAYS.
350-3 SHAKESPEARE PLAYS.

(SCHULZE) MWF 10
MWF I

350-4 SHAKESPEARE PLAYS. (FADER) MWF 4
After a month of using Hamlet as a glass through which to view
the English Renaissance, we will spend between a week and two
weeks on each of the following: Richard 11, The Merchant of
Venice, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, and The Tempest. Students
will write at least one paper on each play, with as many as three
on Hamlet and two on one other play, making o maximum of
ten papers during the semester. All papers will be 2-3 pages
except for a 4-5 pp. paper which will be the mid-term, and a
6-8 pp. paper which will be the final. The course has no exam-
inations and the instructor accepts no reason other than pleasure
for reading Shakespeare's plays.
387 (HUM 237) LIT & PHIL. (LOOMIS) TTh 9-10:30
388 (HUM 239) QUEST FOR UTOPIA. (HOLCOMBE)
MWF 10
393H SURVEY OF ENG LIT: 1600-1800. (ALLISON)
MWF 11
394H STUDIES IN 18C LIT. (MULLIN) MWF 3

rI

407 INTRO MODERN ENGL. (MARKWARDT) M 11
For sections see time schedule.
408 HIST ENGL LANG. (McSPARRAN) TTh 1-2:30

(Lec.)

GREAT BOOKS:
GREAT BOOKS

202-4 (CLOYD) MWThF 1
202-5 (NIEMEYER) MWThF 1

GREAT BOOKS 202-6 (ENGEL) MTWTh 2
The Divine Comedy is the principal book, followed by one or two
plays of Shakespeare, Don Quixote, Paradise Lost, Candide.

GREAT
GREAT
GREAT
223-1
223-2

BOOKS 202-7 (PASLICK) MTWF 3
BOOKS 202-8 MTWF 4
BOOKS 203-1 (WEBER) MTWF 11
CREATIVE WRITING. MWF 8
CREATIVE WRITING. MWF 9

223-3 CREATIVE WRITING. (WRIGHT) TTh 9-10:30
Primarily a course in the writing of poetry. The poetry of students
in the course will be read and discussed in class. Students who
wish may combine the writing of poetry with critical writing or
with drawing or with such graphic media as the woodcut, linocut,
or etching.
223-4 CREATIVE WRITING (RAEBURN) TTh 9-10:30
The instructor will encourage each student to find the form which
is most congenial to him, whether short story, poem, or personal
non-fiction. Considerable latitude, in other words, will be given
students so that they may discover their own metier. There will be
an emphasis on quantity of writing-one project per week, at
least for the first two-thirds of the term, with a more ambitious
project in the final third. Some class meetings will be taken up
by discussions of selected readings from several writers working in
various forms, these to be decided upon by the class; most class
meetings, however, will concentrate on the examination of student
writing.

269-22 INTRO TO AMER LIT. (ALEXANDER) MWF 11
The course will begin with some in-depth reading in two nine-
teenth-century writers' (probably Thoreau and Melville) for ap-
proximately four weeks; an attempt will be. made to establish
some major American concerns, thematic and stylistic. The re-
mainder of the term will de devoted to a variety of twentieth-
century authors: Ginsberg, Mailer, Wright, Baldwin, and Ellison
or Jones. Very probably there will be. an effort to break the class
down into smaller groups that will focus their discussion around
the black writers or around a group of writers of the Beat
Generation, or Mailer.
269-23 INTRO TO AMER LIT. (RUCKER) MWF 2
281-1 CORE I: GT ENGL BKS. (GARBATY) MTWF 10
The first semester of the core-course sequence will consist of
twelve sessions devoted to selections from Chaucer's Canterbury
Tales. Lectures will concern themselves with Chaucer's life, the
Tales, and Courtly Love. Three sessions will be devoted to Gqwoin
andnthe Green Knight, England's finest romance, Shakespeare's
sonnets will be treated as a whole sonnet cycle, although a few
individual sonnets will be closely examined. In general, however,
the Sonnets will be discussed as e.xamples of broad, general atti-
tudes of the poet, rather than taken out of context for micro-
scopic analysis. As with Shakespeare, three or four sessions will
be devoted to the poems of John Donne, stressing the examina-
tion of metaphysical conceits and Donne's variable attitudes
toward love. Two weeks will be devoted to drama, one to
Marlowe's Dr. Faustus and one to Jonson's Volpone. Introductory
lectures on the historical Faustus and the Faust legend, as well
as on Jonson will accompany the class discussion. The course
will end with eleven sessions on Milton's Paradise Lost.
In general, the course is run with specific emphasis on class
discussion, which means that class reading must keep pace with
the syllabus. The theme of the course involves, in general, the
rise and fall of man, from an emphasis on social relationships
through codes of behavior and personal ideals, to the breakdown
of such relationships through too much emphasis on the self.
281-2 CORE I: GT ENGL BKS. (JENSEN) MTWF 1
This section will treat the following authors: Chaucer, Spenser,
Marlowe, Jonson (plays and poetry), Donne, and Milton. Lectures
will focus on intellectual backgrounds and contemporary literary
developments. Students will be expected to participate in class
discussions and present oral reports. Work for the course will
include occasional quizzes, two or three short papers, one longer
paper, a mid-term, and a final examination.
282-1 CORE II: GT ENGL BKS. (LENAGHAN) MTWF 8
Henry Fielding, Tom Jones; Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels;
William Wordsworth and John Keats; Charles Dickens, Bleak
House; W. B. Yeats; G. B. Show, Major Barbaro.This will be
a discussion course. There will be short papers, a mid-term, and
a final examination.
282-2 CORE II: GT ENGL BKS. (WEISBUCH) MWThF 9
A close consideration of masterpieces in Augustan, Romantic,
Victorian, and Modern poetry and fiction. The course will empha-
size the structural vitality of each work, perhaps at the expense
of biographical and historical backgrounds. In addition, the ways
in which each work employs and transforms the traditions of its
literary genre to "make it new" will be considered. Special at-

325-5 INTERMED EXPOSITION.
Writing and more writing of anyF
verse and overt fiction. Something
will be discussed in class and in

325-6 INTERMED EXPOSITION. (RILEY) TTh 1-2:30
325-7 INTERMED EXPOSITION. (GISH) TTh 2:30-4
325-8 INTERMED EXPOSITION. (CATHCART) MWF 4
329 (HIST 329) ELIZ & JAC STUDIES. (GUTH) TTh 3-5
331 INTRO TO POETRY. (HORNBACK) TTh 1-2:30
A reading of poems - one or two a day - for most of the term
- with the aim of appreciating them as poems. Two texts will
be used --- The Pleasures of Poetry and Contemporary American
Poetry - and occasional dittoed poems by the poets who read in
the University poetry series. The class reads "traditional" poetry
as well as contemporary poetry, usually side-by-side. Students
try to find ways of experiencing the poems imaginatively -
responding to them in kind, as it were. Students try to know
how the poets feel as well as what they say. In doing this they
will discover what poetry is - and that it's not iambs and
ABAB and Schnectady and paraphrase. Several short papers,
discussion in and out of class.
ENGLISH 332-1 & 2 (HUM 236) CINEMA (COHEN)
MWF 11 &4
341 LITERARY PROBLEMS. (FORSTNER) MWF 1
342-1 MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE. (JOHNSON) MWF 9
Legacies and Influences. "The Colonial Experience: cultural &
artistic legacies," "The Oral Tradition in African Culture," "The
'English' and 'French' of African Writing." Texts: Chinua Achebe,
Things Fall Apart; James Ngugi, The River Between; Moore &
Beier, Modern Poetry from Africa; Alan Paton, Cry, the Beloved
Country.
Negritude & Contra-Indications: "Negritude is what the
black man brings;" "A Tiger has no need to vaunt his tigritude."
Texts: Leopold Sedar Senghor, Selected Poems; Moore & Beier,
Modern Poetry from Africa.
Imagery, Myth & Identity: "The Christian Influence"; "The
Islamic Influence;" Tribal Mythology." Texts: Ferdinand Oyono,
The Old Man & the Medal; Mongo Beti, The Poor Christ of
Bomba; Camara Laye, The Radiance of the King; Moore and
Beier, Modern Poetry from Africa.

(FALLER) MWF 1
kind the student chooses, save
to be done each week. Writing
private conferences. No texts.

412 MODERN GRAMMAR. (LOURIE) TTh 2:30-4
English 412 assumes no prior training in linguistics. The class will
take up the generative-transformational model of grammar in
addition to some less theoretical, more descriptive accounts of
modern English. The final ;third of the course will examine and
evaluate various attempts to bring linguistics to bear on literary
criticism. The course is therefore especially recommended to stu-
dents interested in adding a linguistic dimension to their reading
of literature.
424 CREATIVE WRITING. (GOLDSTEIN) T 2 Th 2-4
426-1 PRACTICAL CRITICISM. (SMIEHOROWSKI)
MWF 9
Study of myth and genre criticism, focussing on Northrop Frye's
Anatomy of Criticism. Readings will include Shakespeare, Words-
worth, and Lawrence.
426-2 PRACTICAL CRITICISM. (GREENHUT) MWF 11
Course aim: to help the student develop his/her capacity for
independent judgment by intensive study of major works (estab-
lished and current) representing the major literary forms, and by
practice in critical writing. The following texts will be examined:
Aeschylus' Oresteia; Sartre's The Flies and Dirty Hands; Weiss'
Marot/Sade; and Aristotle's Poetics; lIiot's The Waste Land
and On Poetry and Poets; Camus' The Plague and The Myth of
Sisyphus; Bellow's Mr. Sammler's Planet; a nineteenth-century
novel; and an anthology of critical essays edited by Scholes:
Approaches to the Novel. Four or five essays of varying length
will be written, the last being an independent student project
growing out of the readings and the class discussions.
426-3 PRACTICAL CRITICISM. (MITCHELL) MWF i
426-4 PRACTICAL CRITICISM. (HOWES) MWF 4
This course asks one major question, as students look at three
major literary genres (poetry, drama, fiction) : "What pleasures,
attitudes, and critical techniques are appropriate to'the reading
of a poem, or a play, or a novel - how do they differ in each
case?" The poetry reading will represent as wide a variety as
possible, including some from contemporary magazines. The read-
ing of drama will include comparisons of Greek and modern ploys
(Antigone in Sophocles and Anouilh; Aeschylus and Eugene
O'Neill). The fiction, to be read at the end of the semester, will
be chosen by the class itself early in the semetser. Classes will be
conducted through discussion and informal writing will accompany
the reading.
428 WRITING LONG PLAYS. (WYMAN) M 7:30.10:30 PM
429 WRITING POETRY. (GEORGE) T 7,10 PM
430 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE & FICTION. (GINPIN)
MWF 2
A study of representative English, American, and Continental fic-
tion written during the last twenty years. Readings (probably con-
fined to one work by each author) will be likely to include auth-
ars such as Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Beckett, Grass, Iris Myr-
doch, Golding, Fowles, Doris Lessing, Angus Wilson, Barth, Mailer,
Bellow, Heller. Lectures and discussion.
432 (HUM 407) NOVL FR. 1850. (McINTYRE) MWF 4
434 (HUM 409) DRAM FR 1642. (LEECH) MWF 10
Proposed dramatists: Etherege, Wycherley, Congreve, Dryden, Ot-
way, Southerne, Vanbrugh, Farauhar, Gay, Lillo, Fielding, Sheri-
dan, Goldsmith, Shelley. Beddoes, Boucicault, Robertson, Buchner,
Kleist, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pinero, Jones, Wilde, Shaw
and Synge.
This course will be concerned with a number of moiar plays
(and a few not 'major' but historically interesting) in tnglish
drama in the late seventeenth to the early twentieth century.
Emphasis will be given to the relations between drama and the
changing nature of the theatre and of acting cpnditions, and to
the relations between drama and theatre on the one hand and
the social and historical context on the other. From the nineteenth
century, there will also be discussion of the major continental
European playwrights (Buchner, Kleist, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chek-

223-5 CREATIVE WRITING.
223-6 CREATIVE WRITING.
231-1 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY.
231-2 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY.

(JOHNSON)
MWF 4
MWF 9
MWF 10

MWF 2

231-3 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY. (FRASER) MWF 11
This course will be devoted to lyric poetry-the short poem in
English. The class will read English and American poetry from the
Renaissance to present, but not in chronological order, for this is
not intended to be a survey. Neither will the course be excessively
formal. The course will be taught from an open book, not lecture,
and will try to elicit suggestions for reading from the. class. Dis-
cussion will be central. Some critical papers will be set, and a
mid-term essay-exam, as well as a final. The idea, in a nutshell,
is to learn something about poetry and to enjoy it.
231-4 INTRO TO LIT: POETRY. (SANDS) MWF 1
The course will begin with a rapid coverage of the various tech-

I

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan