100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 8,

1972

U

U

English Departnment

Offerings

[Continued from previous page]

440/471-2 AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1914 TO THE PRESENT.
(KONIGSBERG/RABKIN) MW(F) 1-3
The course will be a combined study of significant American
poetry and fiction since World War I, with special emphasis on
Pound, Eliot, Hemingway, and Faulkner. The class will be team
taught, with a new work introduced by one of the instructors each
Monday and Wednesday, and a discussion developed by all mem-
'bers of the class, including both instructors. Visiting faculty will
frequently participate in the course. There will be an optional,
small-enrollment discusrsion of one hour on Fridays.
Poets: Pound, Eliot, Frost, Hart Crane, Langston Hughes,
Stevens, Lowell, Ginsberg. Novelists; Hemingway, in Our Time,
The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms; Faulkner, Go Down,
Moses, As I Lay Dying, The Sound and The Fury; Dos Passos,
42nd Parallel;Toomer, Cane; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; West,
Miss Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust; Malamud, The
Assistant; Barth, End of The Road;' Kesey, One Flew Over the
Cuckoo's Nest.
Students may register for 3 or 4 credits in either 440 or 471,
or register in both for a total of 5 or 6 credits. Students will
design their own paper structure, in proportion to their credits, by
selecting from a list of options in consultation with the staff.
There will be a final examination covering lecture material and
the individual reading list. The course is open to all students.
441 RECENT POETRY. (GOLDSTEIN) T 10-12 Th 10
A survey of recent poetry, distinguished from English 440 (Con-
temporary Poetry) by an emphasis on younger poets whose first
important works appeared in the late 1950's and 1960's. The
course begins, however, with three older poets who are also useful
theoreticians: Dylan Thomas (Quite Early One Morning), Francis
Ponge (Things), and Charles Olson (Selected Writings). In-
dividual books of verse follow, each chosen for its integrity as a
collection.
The reading list has not bee fixed yet, but will probably include
most or all of the following: Robert Bly, Silence in the Snowy
Fields, and Galway Kinnell, The Book of Nightmares (both here
for public readings) ; Sylvia Plath, Ariel; Ted Hughes, Crow; Frank
O'Hara, Lunch Poems; James Schevill, Violence and Glory; Wen-
dell Berry. Farming: A Handbook; Denise Levertov, The Sorrow
Dance; Derek Walcott, The Gulf; Allen Ginsberg, Planet News;
Rosemary Waldrop, The Aggressive Ways of a Casual Stranger;
one book by Gary Snyder; one by Nikki Giovanni; and Pablo
Neruda, The Heights of Macchu Picchu.
443 ENG AUTH: MEDIEVAL. (GARBATY) MWF 9
Reading: Beowulf; "King Horn" and "Havelok the Dane";
Piers, the Ploughman; Gowain and the Green Knight; Everyman
and Medieval Miracle Plays; Malory, The Death of King Arthur.
This course covers the major medieval authors, extensively.
Everything is read in the original except for Beowolf and Piers
the Ploughman. Classes will be held as lectures (on the historical
and literary background of the individual works, on Courtly Love,
Romances, and the life of Mlory), translation of Middle
English, some background in Old English scansion, vigorous
class discussion, play-reading and formal assigned writing. At
least two in-class examinations, partly objective but mostly sub-
jective, will be written with a possible outside paper.
This course covers hard times, filled with periodic flashes '
of magic and love. It covers, above all, a period which is based
on positive, ethical, and social values, on codes of living, and on
a moral (in the basic sense ,of the word) life. As such, all the
culture instructs, all of it is in a sense didactic, though not al-
ways as openly so as Piers the Ploughman. In the medieval
jungle of life, the literature of the times gropes for sanity and
civilization.
445 CHAUCER CANT TALES. (McNAMARA) MWF 1
This course reads, in Middle English, the whole of Chaucer's
Canterbury Tales (except for the prose tracts The Tale of Melibee
and the Parson's Tale). The course presupposes no priot know-
ledge of Middle English and is extremely modest in linguistic
promise: through lectures, study of the texts, and required listen-
ing to tape recordings of the Tales, the student will learn to read
Chaucer in something like his own language in order to appre-
hend the art of the narrative poetry. A series of brief quizzes
measure progress in understanding the text; one essay is written;
final examination.
448 ENGLISH RENAISSANCE AUTHORS. (KNOTT) MWF 4
This corse will deal with the two greatest poets of the English
Renaissance, Spenser and Milton, concentrating on The Faerie
Queene and Paradise Lost, and attempting to define the tradi-
tion to which these works belong by looking at previous epics
(and romances). The course will ask questions about the nature
of epic, of romance, of allegory; about the style of the two writers
and their narrative technique (their management of time, of
perspective, of voice) ; about their treatment of such subjects
as love, sin, and disorder; about the ethical and theological biases
of the poems. The course will be concerned with each poet's con-
ception of his art and of his society (Spenser glorifying Elizabeth
and tracing her lineage back to Arthur; Milton writing, after
the failure of the Puritan revolution, out of a sense of the
fallibility of men and institutions). Work will include short
papers, reports, and perhaps longer individual projects. Students
interested in studying Milton should note that English 444 is not
being offered this year.
450 SHAKESPEARE DRAMATIC WK. (ARTHOS) MWF 9
Shakespeare's works from 1600 to the end. A lecture and dis-
cussion course from Hamlet to The Tempest, taken in chronological
order. This is a continuation of English 449, in which the previous
works were studied, but 450 may be elected independently.
451 NEO-CLASSIC AUTH. (CLOYD) MWF 2
453 ENGL ROMANTIC AUTH. (SMIEHOROWSKI) MWF 11
Intensive study of the poetry of Wordsworth, Byron, and Shelley.
463 MAJ ENGL AUTH: VIC. (HILL) MWF 1
465-1 MODERN ENGLISH AUTHORS. (WEILAND) MWF 11
Readings in and around W. B. Yeats, D. H. Lawrence, and John
Fowles. Yeats: Selected Poems, Eleven Plays, Essays and Intro-
ductions; also: William Irwin Thompson, At the Edge of History.
Lawrence: The Rainbow, Women in Love, Studies in Classic
American Literature, Etruscan Places, Mornings in Mexico, The
Plumed Serpant, Lady Chatterly's Lover and Selected Poems; also:
Thomas Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge; Whitman, Selected
Poems; Norman O.Brown, Life Against Death. Fowles: The
Collector, The Magus, The French Lieutenant's Woman, The
Aristos; also: Raymond Williams, Culture and Society, 1780-1950.
Several short papers and a take-home final.

465-2 MODERN ENGL AUTH. (GREENHUT) MWF 2
An intensive study of representative works of T. S. Eliot (poetry,
drama, and criticism) and D. H. Lawrence. (poetry and fiction) to
reveal the development and the scope of each author's intellectual
and literary interests. To gain a wider perspective, the class will
read Joyce's Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist, and a sampling
of poems by Yeats. Lectures and discussions. Two or three papers.
A mid-term and a final examination.
467 (HUM 404) LIT OF SEA. (MARTIN) MWF 1
469 AMER AUTH TO 1870. (SQUIRES) T 1-3 Th 1
An examination of representative works of Walt Whitman, Edgar
Allan Poe, and Hawthorne. Some lecture; some discussion.
470-1 AMER AUTH TO 1914. (FRANKLIN) MWF 9
Twain, James, Norris, and maybe Stephen Crane. The Course will
hopefully be small enough to conduct on a discussion basis,
Papers and the usual examinations.
470-2 AMER AUTH TO 1914. (MULLIN) MWF 1
A survey of the vast changes in American society and culture
between 1865-1914. This will be achieved by reading in depth
ir' Whitman, Twain, James, and Henry and Brooks Adams.
Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Specimen Days; Twain, Life on
the Mississippi, Roughing It, Innocents Abroad; James, The
Europeans, Portraits of a Lady, The Bostonians, The Ambassadors,
The American Scene; Adams, The Education of Henry Adams,
Mont St. Michel and Chartres, The Dearadation of the Demo-

Selected Poems and The Fathers.. Aeschylus' Orestes plays will
be read during the discussion of O'Neill's Mourning Becomes
Electra. Lectures will be varied by panel discussions and special
reports. Four critical papers and the final examination will con-
stitute the writing requirement.
471-2 AMERICAN LIT: 1914 TO THE PRESENT
See 440/471 above. (KONIGSBERG/RABKIN)
471-3 AMER AUTH 1914-PRES. (BLOTNER) MWF 4
The authors studied in this course will be F. Scott Fitzgerald,
Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner. For each author,
students will read a collection of short stories and then go on to
major novels, tentatively The Great Gatsby and Tender is the
Night for Fitzgerald; The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and
For Whom the Bell Tolls for Hemingway; The Sound and the Fury,
Sanctuary, Light in August, and Asalom, Absaloml for Faulkner.
This material will explore diverse areas and themes in American
literature and culture, e.g., the 1920's and 1930's, The South,
"the American Dream" and disillusionment. There will also be
close attention to style as well as form: Fitzgerald's poetic prose,
Hemingway's terseness, Faulkner's rhetoric, among other devices.
Each segment will begin with introductory material on relevant
elements of the author's life and work. There will then be a
rapid progression with each work from sources to composition
to critical assessment. Insofar as class size will permit, the dis-
cussion method will be used once the preliminaries are treated.
474-1 AM LIT SINCE 1870. (DAVIS) MWF 1
This survey will begin with the poetry of Whitman, Lanier, and
Emily Dickinson; will then turn to fiction and other prose by
Henry James, Mark Twain, and Howells; will glance at regional
short stories by Harte, Cable, Jewett, and Garland; and will
define the relationship of Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, and
Dreiser to the development of naturalism as a literary movement.
Robinson and Frost will be considered as reflecting naturalism and
humanism, respectively, in 20th-Century poetry; Sandburg and
Hart Crane as inheritors of Whitman; Cabell as leading an anti-
naturalistic protest in the genre of fantasy; Mencken, Glasgow,
Cather, Lewis, Anderson, and Fitzgerald as representative of the
1920's; Dos Possos, Farrell, and Steinbeck as spokesmen of the
1930's; Eliot, Stevens, Hemingway, and Faulkner as major figures
emerging from these decades. Richard Wright as a major Black
writer and Roethke and Robert Lowell as major recent poets will
conclude the course. The method of presentation will be primarily
lecture, varied possibly by a few panel discussions.

will then be divided equally between English and American, 19th
and 20th century novels and poems by the famous and the
forgotten. Several of these will be decided upon in class after
the introductory readings. Though these materials will be almost
entirely literary, the subject of the course will often be "culture,"
defined here, tentatively, as "the structure of institutions which
express or govern domestic and social relationships and the char-
asteristic forms through which members of society communicate"
(Williams), Several short papers and an extended independent
project.
499 CRITICAL APPROACH. (KHANNA) T 2-4 Th 1
Indian Fiction in English. The object of the course will be to
examine from a formal and stylistic point of view eight or ten
novels written directly in English. The novel is a Western form
which undergoes at the hands of Indian writers varying degrees
of adaptation to suit the Indian view of social and metaphysical
reality. Standard English syntax and idiom are also frequently
altered to permit the writer to render Indian life faithfully. The
course will begin by making some statements about the difference
between European and Hindu values, by way of Gandhi's My
Experiments with Truth, Nirad Chaudhury's Autobiography of an
Unknown Indian, and Sasthi Brata's My God Died Young. The
course will then go on to one or more novels by the following
writers: R. K. Norayan, Raja Rao, Mulk Raj Anand, Anita Desai,
Khushwant Singh, B. Rajan. If there is interest in comparison with
British writing about India, we may read some of Kipling's
short stories and Forster's A Passage to India. Requirements: one
paper.
FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS:
502 OLD ENGL POETRY. (ROBINSON) MWF 9
An introduction to the-study of Beowulf. Most time and effort
in the course will be given to a close and accurate reading in the
original language of as much of the poem as it is possible to
read in one semester. But students will also be asked to do read-
ings and writing that will help them appreciate the scholarship
that has preserved the poem, the place of the poem in its original
settings - literary, historical, and cultural - and the significance
of the poem for the modern student of English literature. The
class will try to remember that the poem is a literary document,
but the instructor will insist that the poem must first be approach-
ed through its language.
524 CREATIVE WRITING. (HAYDEN) ARR,
531 CONTEMPORARY FICT. (GINDIN) MWF 3
Lectures and discussion on fiction and drama since 1945. The
course will include novelists such as Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet,
Gunter Grass, Iris Murdoch, Barth, Bellow, di Lampedusa, Angus
Wilson, Mailer, and John Fowles, dramatists (taking about 11
of the course) such as Brecht, lonesco, Durrenmatt, Pinter, and
Albee.
534 DRAMA (BAULAND) MWF 1
Exactly what will be done in English 534 during the Winter of
1973 will depend in large part upon the preferences stated to the
instructor by potential enrollees, no later than November 15, 1972.
The purpose of the course is to deal intensively with a carefully
focussed problem in the advanced study of the drama. Student
suggestions are enthusiastically invited. Some suggestions that are
offered only as catalysts to your own thought: comic responses to
catastrophe in modern drama; myths that have served as the basis
for dramatic interpretations throughout the years; post-World
War I British drama; major American playwrights of the modern
period; a few major contemporary playwrights, without regard to
nationality; the nature of comedy.

will be selected from that survey of the field accomplished in
English 611: regional and social dialectology, lexicography,
poetics, topics in the history of the English language.
632 PROSE FICTION. (BAKER) T 2 Th 2-4
Proseminar in fiction, concentrating on nineteenth-century and
modern novelists, a continuation of 631, its prerequisite. The aim
is to bring the theoretical ideas and historical prospective develop-
ed in 631 to bear on a major paper dealing with a novelist (or
problem) of the student's choice. Students will present preliminary
short explications from a list of 4 or 5 major novels, to be
chosen by the class, and to be read and discussed by the group.
634 ENGLISH DRAMA. (ENGEL) T 10 Th 10-12
English 634 is a sequel to 633 and is open, theoretically at least,
only to those students who were enrolled in the earlier course.
Long before the Fall term ends everybody will have laid his plans
for the Winter term:individual projects (criticism, translation, even
acting and playwriting) relating to a contemporary - and current
- drama. The entire group will share the results.
638 CRITICISM. (SCHULZE) T 1 Th 1-3
646 ENGL LIT MID AGES. (LENAGHAN) M 10-12 F 9
This is the second semester of the proseminar. The main job will
be the long seminar paper, but the first part of the term will
be devoted to presentation of non-literary materials with implica-
tions for, or analogy to, literature.
648 ENGL LIT RENAISS. (JENSEN) M 9 W 9-11
652 NEO-CLASSICAL. (OGDEN) M 3 W 3-5
654 ENGL LIT ROMANTIC, (COLES) M I W 1-3
Only for students continuing from 653.
660 ENGLISH LIT: VICTORIAN (SUPER) M 3-5 W 3
.A continuation of English 659. The reading will be in the minor
and later Victorian poets-FitzGerald, Clough, Christina Rossetti,
Swinburne, Meredith, Hardy, Housman, Hopkins, and Yeats-for
class discussion. The principal paper, intended as training in the
use of scholarly techniques in the handling of a literary problem,
will probably, but not necessarily, draw its subject from one of
the four poets read in the first term.
666 ENGL LIT MODERN. (BARROWS) T 10 Th 10-12
This is the second semester of a two-semester course. In the first
semester, students examined four principal episodes in the
development of the Modern 'Period: Origins; Yeats; Eliot-Pound;
Auden and the Thirties. In this semester more central attention
will be given to student contributions, and there will be an effort
to recognize individual choices for main-paper topics. But per-
haps the class time will be devoted to one or two important figures
not handled in the first semester.
669-70 (SEC I) AMERICAN LIT. (POWERS) MWF 3
TTh 3-5
This double proseminar will follow the traditional plan of
organization: the first half will survey a particular area of
American literature and the second will focus on a single author.
The author chosen for special emphasis is William Faulkner, and
the second half of the course will be devoted to an intensive
study of his Yoknapatawpha fiction. The first half (669) will
be a study of the background against which Faulkner's Yokna-
patawpha fiction is to be seen to the most instructive advantage,
and it will include pertinent representative works by Hawthorne,
Twain, H. James, Sherwood Anderson, and Hemingway, with
emphasis on both thematic and technical matters. The study
of Faulkner (670) will examine the growth and development
of the .Yoknapatawpha fiction into an organically unified whole,
the persistent reiteration of certain basic themes that contribute
to the affirmative and fundamentally optimistic statement of the
Yoknapatawpho Saga, and the various technical means Faulkner
employed to achieve effective artistic expression in his work. The
second half of the course will rely on the discoveries of the first,
and will observe relations between Faulkner's work and that of
the "background" figures studied in the first half. 669 will be
concluded by a written examination, 670 will require at least one
brief report delivered orally, and a substantial term paper.
670-2 AMERICAN LIT. (BLOTNER) W 1 F 1-2
This course forms a proseminar in American Literature with
English 669. This latter course treats American novels from
Hawthorne to Hemingway and is meant to provide a broad back-
around to be complemented by the narrower but deeper concen-
tration upon the work of one writer in English 670. This writer
is William Faulkner, and the form and content- of several
major novels - Sartoris, The Sound and The Fury, Sanctuary,
As I Lay Dying, Light in August, Pylon, Absalom, Absalom!. The
Wild Palms, The Hamlet, and perhaps Go Down, Moses. (with
some earlier attention to the first two novels) - will form the
substance of the course. The instructor will present material on
cultural, historical, and personal background, on the genesis of
the novels, and then shift to the discussion method, with each
student responsible for a report on criticism of one of the novels
plus a term paper. Ne.w students will be allowed into the course
only with permission of the instructor.
INTELLECTUAL HISTORY:

r

0

476
478
479H
482
483

(AFR 476) CONTM AF-AM LIT. (GIPSON) MWF 10
(HUM 464) AMER DRAMA. (STANTON) MWF 10
JUNIOR SEMINAR. (KNOTT) MWF 1
HUM 417) ENGL BIBL. (BEARD) MWF 3
(HUM 455) LIT & MOD THOUGHT (CHAPIN) MWF 1

486 INTERDIS APPROACH. (ALEXANDER) M 2 W 2-4
There will be four principle emphases. 1) The nature ofthe
creative mind. The class ,willconsult Freud, Kubie, and other
psychologists and scientists, will consider opinions of writers like
Proust, and will probably read some autobiography - perhaps
that of Henry James. 2) The nature of audience response. Con-
sideration of individual readers and mass audiences, with perhaps
some look into other media. What kinds of relevance does liter-
ature have and what kinds does it not have? Simon Lesser's
Fiction and the Unconscious, work by Norman Holland and others
will be included. 3) Psychoanalytic criticism. Norman 0. Brown,
the periodical Psychology and Literature, Frederick Crews, etc.
4) Works of literature - and, perhaps, film (Persona, certainly
Chien Andalu) - which are intended as psychological investi-
gations. Works on suicide, on insanity, etc. Possibly The Bell
Jar, Knots.
489-1 (ED D 440) TEACH ENGL. (FADER) MWF 2
This is a specialized section of the English Methods course in-
tended primarily to prepare teachers for classrooms of impover-
ished urban and rural children. The instructor's first purpose is to
help prospective teachers identify their own suitability for such
classrooms. The second purpose is to aid middle-class teachers
to observe the identity of lower-class children.
Requirements of the course are the reading of a book each
- week from a list and library provided by the instructor, the keep-
ing of a detailed journal throughout the course, the model teach-
ing of language and literature by every member of the class, and
responsibility by each student in the course for the work of
several classmates. Readings will be drawn from the works of
authors such as Ellison, Grier and Cobbs, Cleaver, Herndon, Holt,
Kohl, Illich, Silbemman, Bar, and Kozol.
489-2 (ED D 440) TEACH ENGL. (DUNNING) MWF 11
Main Aim: To consider, practice, and experiment with approaches
to the subject matters of the school English class.
Areas: Teaching literature; teaching language and writing;
teaching reading; the school program in English; the profession
(including "discipline," expectations).
Examples of Specific Topics: A rhetorical approach to poetry;
helping students judge short stories; reading plays; designing
"outside reading"; junior books; assigning student writing; grad-
ing and marking; the paper load; what grammar shall we teach;
"language" vs. grammar; diagnosing and remedying reading
problems; the teacher stereotype.
Methods: lecture/discussion; micro-teaching; guests (teach-
ers, student teachers, supervisors, specialists) ; individual and
group project; lesson plans.
489-3 (ED D440) TEACH ENGL. (HOLLOWELL)
TTh 1:30-3
Authors treated: Burton, Literature Study in the High School;
Dunning, Teaching Literature to Adole-cents; Fader, The Naked
Children; Herndon, How to Survive in our Native Land; Mac-
rorie, Uptaught; Moffett, A Student-Centered Language Arts
Curriculum, K-13.
Aims: to consider and practice the teaching of literature,
poetry, and composition in the secondary schools. Sample topic:
strategies for teaching the short story.
Methods: class interaction, micro-teaching, group and indiv-
idual projects, guest "experts," lecture (minimal).

538 CRITICISM.
546 CHAUCER.

(CLARK) MWF 10
(REIDY) MWF 3

547 RENAISSANCE PERIOD. (ARTHOS) MWF 11
Humanism. A critical review of the history and philosophic founda-
tions of the study of literature. Commencing with readings in
More, Erasmus, and Milton, students in the course will examine
the arguments developed in the Renaissance for placing literature
at the center of education. They will then examine the later
history of the claims for humanism in Huxley, Whitehead, Sartre
("What is literature?"), Merleau-Ponty, Arendt (The Human
Condition), D'Arcy and other contemporaries.
550 SHAKESPEARE'S PLAYS. (LEECH) MWF 12
Shakespeare: A Critical and Textual Study. This will be centered
on a study of three or four major plays, chosen primarily to
illustrate the different textual situations that present themselves
in Shakespeare's writings, with a detailed critical study of the
plays chosen. The history of Shakespeare editing from the
seventeenth to the twentieth century will be included.
551 SURVEY 18C. (KONIGSBERG) MWF 4
An in-depth study of English literature from about 1660 until
the end of the eighteenth century. The emphasis will be on critical
analyses of major works, but the course will also consider intellec-
tual and sociological backgrounds, specific literary developments
(especially in the drama, satire, and the novel), and particular
cultural movements (i.e., neoclassicism, sentimentalism, gothicism,
romanticism). The class will concentrate on works by Dryden,
Wycherley, Congreve, Swift, Pope, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding,
Boswell, Johnson, and Sheridan.
554 ROMANTIC PERIOD. (COLES) MWF 3
An. introduction on the graduate level to major authors of the
Romantic period. The course will examine in depth the moaor
works of four or five Romantic poets - Wordsworth, Coleridge,
Byron, Shelley, Keats - together with critical and epistolary
materials which help to illuminate their work and the larger
topic of Romantic ideas and concerns. The course will be conducted
in a discussion section supplemented by lectures. The text will be
David Perkins, English Romantic Writers, with some additional
supplementary reading.
563 VICTORIAN PERIOD. (HILL) MWF 10
566 MODERN PERIOD. (SQUIRES) MWF 9
The poetry of Dylan Thomas and W. H. Auden, with attention
to other figures, such as Robert Graves and Stephen Spender.
Discussion.
569 AMERICAN LITERATURE. (EBY) TTh 10:30-12
Literature and society: The American Novel, 1875-1925. The
course treats approximately fifteen American novels written
between 1875 and 1925 which focus directly or indirectly upon
significant political or social problems in American life and
culture. During this period the democratic optimism of the Whit-
manic tradition steadily eroded as novelists viewed and wrote
about the society in which they lived. Increasingly the novelist
shouldered a problem-defining role in which individual characters
functioned as metaphors of social force almost too omnipotent
to be coped with. In effect, these novelists became hostile wit-
nesses testifying to the dehumanization of modern life generally
and of American life in particular. America was viewed no longer
as "Land of Promise," but as "Land of Broken Promise," to use
Lowell's phrase.
After prefatory and positioning statements by the lecturer,
two-person teams of students will initiate discussion of each novel,
attempting not to "teach" but to suggest lines of inquiry (whe-
ther in form or content) worthy of pursuit by the class as a whole.
Those novels to be studied will probably include the following:
Twain, The Guilded Age and Huckleberry Finn; Adams, Demo-
cracy; James, The Bostonians; Howells, A Hazard of New
Fortunes; Crane, Maggie; Frederic, The Damnation of Theron
Ware; Norris, The Octopus; Sinclair, The Jungle; London,
Martin Eden; Wharton, The Age of Innocence; Lewis, Main
Street; Dreiser, An American Tragedy; Dos Possos, Manhattan
Transfer; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby.
581 DEVELOPMENT OF LITERACY. (BAILEY & VAN'T HUL)
T 1-3 Th 1-3
Restricted Ito students in the Doctor of Arts program for whom
it is a required course. For details of the 580-581 sequence, see
the D. A. brochure available from the Graduate Office.
593 BIBL & RES METHODS. (CREETH) TTh 9-10:30
This is chiefly intended for first-year graduate students planning
to go on for the Ph. D. It should serve to differentiate their
programs from those of "terminal" M. A. candidates and to
give an introduction to the professional side of the discipline. It
falls naturally into three parts: heuristic bibliography (how to find
out things in big libraries), physical bibliography with some
practice in editing of texts, and method. Except for the last, this
is all very traditional. "Method" now must involve a philosophical
and open discussion of what professors of English do or ought
to be doing. Traditional convictions will be presented by the
instructor and by members of the class in reports. As basis for
discussion, two somewhat opposing views are embodied in texts
for this part of the course, Wellek and Warren, Theory of Liter-
ature, and Hirsch, Validity in Interpretation.

489-4
493H
494H

(ED D 440) TEACH ENGL. (LAYCOCK) MWF 10
MEREDITH TO PRESENT. (BARROWS) TTh 1-2:30
MEREDITH TO PRESENT. ARR

745 M AGES & RENAISS. (WILLIAMS) MWF 11
Since it is impossible to speak meaningfully of medieval and
renaissance intellectual history in terms of a single national
literature, class discussion will ranee widely over a variety of
European literatures, though all works assigned will be available
in English. The focus of discussion will be medieval and renais-
sance concepts of the nature of the state, authority, and a proper
education. The first three weeks of the course will be devoted
to a set of lectures on the classical antecedents of medieval and
renaissance culture, emphasing Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Vergil,
and Paul of Tarsus. During the next five or six weeks, students
will examine a series of late classical and medieval texts, in-
cluding selections from the works of Plotinus, Augustine, the
encyclopedists, Hugh of St. Victor, Aquinas, the Goliard poets,
Dante, and Chaucer. The final section of the course will center on
selected works of Petrach, Salutati, Castiglione, Machiavelli,
Rabelais, Marlowe, and Spenser.
751 17th is 18th C.: THE ENLIGHTENMENT (OGDEN) MWF !
This course will explore the following topics: (1) the role of
"ideas" in literature; (2) reason, the law of nature, grace, and
the uses of knowledge: Hooker, Calvin and St. Paul, Montaigne,
Bacon, and Hobbes; (3) the pivotal philosophy of John Locke;
(4) benevolism, the moral sense, sentimentalism, and the recon-
citation of "self-love and social": Shaftesburv, Mandeville, Addi-
son, Steele, Bishop Butler, Pope. Hume; (5) the "ancients and the
moderns" and the beginnings of the temporal perspective: Temple,
Wotton, Swift; (6) the recognition of the time process, the threat
of changing values, and the lure of progress: Hume, Rousseau,
Priestley, Burke.
SEMINARS:
833 DRAMA. (STYAN) Th 10-12
The Spirit'of Restoration Comedy: a purposefully stage:-centered
and period approach to a better understanding and evaluation
of Restoration comedy. Existing criticism of almost entirely a
moral or new-critical kind leaves the reader with little sense of
why this was one of the unique and most brilliant and successful
modes of drama in the history of theatre; we shall put this
right. Work will consist of close 'performance analysis' - even
exploratory performance itself if the spirit (mentioned in the
title) moves - from a few plays by Etherege, Wycherley, Con-
greve, and Farquhar (with extension into the Georgian comedy
of Goldsmith and Sheridan if wanted),
846 ENGL LIT MIDDL AGES. (KUHN) F 9-11
English 846, as the instructor conceives it, is a very flexible
course, so flexible that it cannot be described with precision at
this time. It will be a seminar in Middle English, and students
will be expected to have a background equivalent to that provided
by English 504. Although the course number indicates a literary
.course, Middle English literature cannot be studied effectively
without frequent consideration of problems in linguistics and
dialectolosy. The course willrtherefore, be a combination course;
students whose primary interest is in language should be able
to pursue their individual interests as readily as the literary stu-
dents pursue theirs.
The course is envisaged as a real seminar, in which the
students will be set to work as soon as practicable on problems
of their own choosing, either literary or linguistic. The major
emphasis will be on the dialects of Western England and on such
literary works as Layamon's Brut, the Katherine Group, the
Owl and the Niahtingale, Audlev's poems, the Gawain poet, the
Wars of Alexander. But those who prefer to concentrate on other
areas or other authors - except Chaucer, who needs a seminar
all to himself - will not be discouraged.
441 CM.EII1 1IT iI c%11 A !Att iEI I MAWI W 113

495 STUDIES IN LIT BEFORE 1800. (HAMILTON) MWF 3
Scops, Skalds and Bards: a seminar given to readings in the early
literature of Northern Europe, to the literature of Iceland, Ire-
land, Wales and Anglo-Saxon England. Since there is so much
of this literature - epic and lyric poetry, legendary, fictional
and historical narratives in prose - the course might divide into
small groups that concentrate on portions of the whole. Several
brief reports and a final paper will form the student's chief
contribution to the course. It is hoped that the class will all be
ready to read and listen and discuss.
Two large questions might guide the work of the group. 1)
What did these people regard as fact, what as fiction, and how
do the two inter-twine? 2) Who were these writers? That is, how.
can fact be disentangled from fiction when considering the life
of Coedmon, of Bede, or of the Beowulf poet, of an Icelandic
or Irish saga writer, or of a bard, or a skald, or a scop?
496 STUDIES IN LIT FROM 1800. (LOURIE) T 10 Th 10-12
The course, "Women in Victorian Literature," will examine from
a feminist perspective works written in England between 1830
and 1900. It will aim to understand literature by and about
women in a culture distant enough from the present to admit
objective analysis, yet enough like the present to offer insight
into the modern situation. Works by Dickens, Tennyson, and
Ruskin will be read in order to understand the male version of
the Victorian feminine ideal -- as well as works by male femin-
ists like Mill, Gissing, and Show. The class will also study works
by women - George Eliot, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett,
Christina Rossetti, and perhaps Elizabeth Gaskell - to get
some idea of the female reaction in both fiction and.poetry to

I-

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan