100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 26, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 26, .1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, September 26, 1972

Long Philippine crisis foreseen

N. Viets agree to release all

POWs

WASHINGTON (P) - Philippine,
Cabinet Executive Secretary Ale-
jandro Melchor, a top aide of Pres-
ident Marcos, said yesterday that
martial law in the Philippines may
last two years or longer, and dur-
ing that time a land reform pro-
gram can be realized.
Without martial law, he said, it
could possibly take 200 years to at-
tain the goals the administration
has set.
At a news conference called by
Philippine ambassador Eduardo,
Romualez, the cabinet official de-
clared that President Marcos has.
"put his neck on the block" with
the declaration of martial law last
weekend.
"He must gain the support of the
people. If.he does not gain their
support-the effort- will fail. These
are bold measures on his part,"
Romualdez added.
Late yesterday, the presidential
palace announced that fifty-three
prominent Filipinos, including two
provincial governors, six members
of Congress and seven newspaper-
men have been arrested in the Ma-
nila region since martial law was
proclaimed over the weekend.
Eight newsmen also detained un-
der the Philippines' martial law ad-
ministration have petitioned t h e
Supreme Court for a writ of habeas
corpus, their lawyer said yester-
day.
Melchor, who left the Philippines
for 'Washington two hours before.
martial law was imposed to attend
a meeting of the International
Monetary Fund . here, emphasized
that there has not been a military
takeover in the Philippines a n d
that civilians are still running the
government.
He said the Philippine Congress
and the Philippine constitutional
convention which is drafting a new
constitution have not been suspend-
ed. .
Melchor said he thought there
would still be an opposition view

expressed in the Philippines in the disastrous floods last summer. In lightning moves, Marcos clos-
Congress or the constitutional con- He said that the emphasis on ed down all but one of Manila's
vention provided it was "construc- land reform has been sparked by 15 daily newspapers, and shut six
tive." instances in two provinces w h e r e of the city's seven television sta-
In terms of the problems ahead, large areas of land were control- tions and nine of the major radio
he said Marcos can now mobilize led by only a few owners. Tenants stations.
the resources of the country and took over land in these provinces The presidential p ali a c e has
the people. and were supported by armed men claimed popular support for Mar-
Before martial law, he said the of the New People's Army. cos' moves. Marcos said Manila,
opposition sentiment did not want Melchor said that a suspension one of the worst crime cities in
to provide funds for land reform or of newspapers and broadcast sta- the world, has had two crime-free
for more than $300 million in cala- tions in the Philippines was for an days since martial law was. de-
mity appropriations to overcome indefinite period. clared.

after war agreement

HANOI (/P) - Premier Pham Van
Dong of North Vietnam has reiter-
ated that the North VietnameseI
want to release all captured Amer-'
ican pilots and will do so when
there is agreement on settling the
war.
Dong said in an informal 90-min-'
ute discussion Sunday, attended by
an Associated Press reporter and
the four antiwar activists w h o;
came to Hanoi to escort home three
released fliers, that President Nix-
on was aware of the need for a
psettlement beforeetheremaining
pilots could be freed. He asserted
that there was no misunderstand-
ing on this point.
The premier said the framework
for settlement of the war has long
been available in the seven-point
proposal put forward by the pro-
visional revolutionary government,
the Viet Cong. This calls for the
total withdrawal of American forc-
es and the formation of a coalitionZ
government.t
In a long discussion on the war,t
Dong referred to Americans who*
thought they could have defeated
North Vietnam with armamentst
and politics and who had imaginedt
for years that the Hanoi govern-
ment would not survive. Those peo-1
ple are still waiting for the end1
just as they waited in 1964-1968, he.
said.
The premier admitted that much1
of his country was devastated and
that his people had made m a n y
sacrifices, but he said their minds
were lucid and hearts proud, theyt
knew. the reasons to fight and thatc
to win the war meant whining,
peace, independence and freedom.

Meanwhile, former Atty. G e n .
Ramsey Clark said in Boston yes-
terday he is not optimistic NorthI
Vietnam will release any m o r eI
American prisoners of war, and he
said the attitudes of governmentI
officials would be to blame if they1
don't.
"It is imperative that everyone
who wants prisonerstreleased act
in a way conductive to their re-.
lease," Clark said.
He said Defense Secretary Mel-t
vin Laird's charge on Sunday that
North Vietnam was violating Gen-
eva accords by using prisoners of1

war and their families for propa-
ganda purposes should not have
been made "until we hear from
them the prisoners first.
"I think they will tell us if they'fve
been used," Clark said, adding that,
he did not believe any of the Amer-
ican party in Hanoi recently had
been coerced into saying anything.'
"We're getting three precious
human lives and Laird takes this
time to criticize North Vietnam.
I am not optimistic any other pris-
oners will be released in the near
future," Clark said.

Tragic and violent story of.the
destruction of two bgys reared
in the slums of Mexico City.
LOS OLVIDADOS
(The Young & the
Damned)
Dir. by LOUIS BUNUEL
1950. Spanish, subtitles.
PLUS:
UNCHIEN ANDALOU
1928. BUNUEL & DALI
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7 &9p.m. 75c

r .

v

Freed POWs shun Nixon,

v-

to return via
From Wire Service Reports
Three U.S. prisoners released by
North Vietnam left by plane yes-
terday for Nanning, China, to re-
turn home via Peking and Moscow,
according to Hanoi reports.
The men reportedly told Presi-
dent Nixon that they did not wish
to return home with military es-
corts, but with the delegation of
American peace activists who ne-
gotiated their release.
The men's route will take them
from Nanning to Peking, then to
Moscow and Copenhagen. They are
scheduled to arrive in New York
at about 6 p.m. Thursday.
At the White House news secre-
tary Ronald Ziegler refused to
comment on the release of the
prisoners.
"These men have been through

Peking
a terrible ordeal," Ziegler noted.
"Our interest is their safe arrival
back home."
For the past week the POWs, all
of them pilots shot down over
North Vietnam, have been given
tours of the country

r

SGC
hereby announces it has a vacancY
Applications will be taken for the open
seat, in Room 3X, Mich. Union.
For more info call 763-3241

AP Photo
PHILIPPINE PRESIDENT FERDINAND MARCOS (left) meets
with his cabinet in Manila in the wake of his declaration of martial
law.

UP IN CANADA
Pot penalty to be lowered?

HALO
The word halo - a circ
light - comes from the G
name for a threshing floor
which oxen walked a cir
path by going round and rx
the floor.
FLASH
A lightning bolt generates
peratures five times hotter1
the surface of the sun.

.:.YO<-.o ?<=> 1( Mi) QyC0 .Y>
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
le of Tomorrow & Thursday-Sept. 27 & 28
ree kn LORD BYRON'S LOVE LETTER
maonlar by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
rular directed by JENNY MARTIN
un AND
TREVOR
a by JOHN BOWAN
m directed by DEBRA POGATS
tern-
than 4:10 p.m.-ARENA THEATRE
(FRIEZE BUILDING)
o --vo -- > c-)< <-::-.-- o < c -::> rc:->e0<-c5c

NOW
DIAL 5-6290

SHOWS AT
1:10-3:10-5:00-
7:05-9 p.m.

- I'WJfCL9WflAM ~e~I 0WI 99I

From Wire Service Reports
The Canadian government is expected to reduce
penalties for possession of marijuana later t h i s
year.
Under legislation to be introduced to the Canad-
ian parliament in the current session, the maximum
penalty would drop to $200 for first offenders and
to $400 for subsequent offenses.
Conviction for trafficking of any drugs, including
marijuana, and possession of narcotics will still
bring stiff fines and/or jail sentences.
Under current law amendments, judges are able
to direct that a person found guilty of simple pos-
session be discharged without any criminal record,
or undertake probation conditions. The Canadian

department of justice has urged all criminal pro-
5ecutors in marijuana cases to urge courts to de-
cide this way if the defendant has no previous
criminal record and is under no concurrent con-
viction for other offenses.
The Liberal Party government under Pierre Tru-
deau has emphasized that it will not consider any
form of legalization even though a report by the
Commission on the Non-Medical Use of Drugs has
recommended removal of all penalties for posses-
sion of marijuana or cultivation for personal use.
Convictions for possession of marijuana in Can-
ada last year totaled 7,052. Only 570 of these were
jailed, and only 15 of those jailed were convicted on
a first offense.

U!

I

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor,M
Mc-igan 420 Maynard,. Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daly Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion.- rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 no4-local mail (other
states and foreign).

/ . ... .

Y f Y f/'/'.9 F iii*{ ;:.. /,:+':'+i; h "' F {%C /.n.',^,. FM1;,i JA:}F 5'f,.
?? '."'. .te a:: ,..;:: ยข :; aH."..u:.:. .i<:. fi'i %l+F.';Y :y , . l .......

MUM

Do Something for
sOmeone else
and by doing so, benefit yourself
SERVICE-APO
Sun., 7 p.m., 1544 SAB 761-7913
.. ...f.. % ...r . :... r... r. .. ...... ... . .. ... . .. .j.' : r. .4. i . .. ..
.. . i....i .. ........ . . ...... ... _ . -_. .a .. . .. .

BLOW-UP
BLOW-UP
BLOW-UP
Michelangelo Antonioni's stunning cinematic milestone
f DAVID HEMMINGS " VANESSA REDGRAVE@* SARAH MILES
# Music by HERBIE HANCOCK 0 THE YARDBIRDS (with Jeff Beck)
0 BEST PICTURE of the Year 0 BEST DIRECTOR-New York Film Critics
* ". . . the sharpest cinema of the year"-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. TIMES
* "Antonioni revolutionized the art of the color film with Blow-Up . . . Until Blow-Up no film-
maker had successfully used color to deal with real people in r e a I situations on a contemporary
basis."
ORIGINAL FORMAT UNCUT 35MM THEATRICAL PRINT FOR BRILLIANCE OF COLOR & SOUND
TONIGHT!-Sept. 26th-ONLY!-35mm COLOR 7 & 9:30 p.m.
TOMORROW!-"SOME OF MY BEST FRIENDS ARE"... (First Run!)
COMING THURSDAY-James Taylor in TWO-LANE BLACKTOP
NEXT TUESDAY-The Marx Brothers in A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
all showings in AUDITORIUM "A" ANGELL HALL-$1
tickets on sale for all of each evenings performances at 6 p.m. outside the auditorium

I

An Irreverent Comedy Spoof
of Doctors and Hospitals!
with THE SEXIEST NURSE
in Military History!
Their bedside manner will bring a quick re-
covery to anyone looking for fun and enter-
tainment.
Peter Sellers
as Albert 7.Noptnaget
HospitalAdministrator in
IWhereU

.iL

Hurt?"
M EASIuANCOROQ VR4 RERAJA RAREASI
COMING
"BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE"

A UAC-DAYSTAR CONCERT
The Persuasions are practition-
ers of ''street-corner" acapella
style of singing . . . you're not
going to find a group in the
world more expert at instilling
F 7 in its audience a heartfelt,
genuinely uplifting s p i r i t of
sheer joy.
* LA. TIMES
THE PERSUASIONS .".
will appear with CHEECH & CHONG at Hill Aud. on Saturday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m. Tickets
$2-$3-$3.50-$4.00 just went on sale so get a choice seat today.: Michigan Union
1 1-6 p.m., Salvation Records on Maynard St. Sorry, no personal checks.
ALSO, On Sale Now at Michigan Union ONLY: Commander Cody, Asleep At The Wheel coming Oct.
27-$2-$3-$3.50. Stevie Wonder coming Oct. 28-$2.50-$4-$4.50-$5,
~ ...................%a HEAP PIZZA
Once again, PIZZA BOB'S is offering
the finest pizza in town at lower than low
prices. With this coupon save 25 cents on a
ry;. baby pizza, 35 cents on.a small, 50 cents
on a medium and 75 cents on a large.
.... ... ...And you cnn have this snlendiforous

I

,I

d0
00
-
*0
C0
SE
LIKE
SAM'S
Ic a

4I

I

N"

2

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan