100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 26, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Tuesday, September 26, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Free

OPEN DAILY at 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m. cinema
Feature 5 min. later
EeryR Bl5 .mcu e bea rd:. Total put-on

r

By DAVID GRUBER
Once again we have the chance
to revel in a really bad movie.
Bluebeard is a work of art on
par with a Japanese outer space
picture or a Saturday matinee
horror show. For those who used
to, or still do, thrive on s u c h
films, Bluebeard's high quality
banalities are cause for a holi-
day.
Unlike most movies meant to
rout the senses and the pocket-
book, Bluebeard is a total put
on, and it knows it. The original

screenplay is comprised of stol-
en bits and pieces from films
dealing with psychopaths, wo-
man-killers, and the like. Rich-
ard Burton, who hides his elo-
quent voice behind an accent of
no discernable nationality (mere-
ly a method of humbling himself
to his role), plays Baron K u r t
von Sepper, a Nazi officer by
day, an Oedipus complex by
night. He is one of those who
likes to have mother close at
hand, whether she is alive or
dead. Indeed, mother is kept

ATTENTION residents of

MARKLEY-OXFORD
MARRIED STUDENT HOUSING
GET INVOLVED
Interview to become a representative
to the University Housing Council.
Call or write Bill Winkel, Chairperson
UHC, 301 Cooley EQ-4-3616

music-
Alas ... the director

THE
BACH CLUB
does it again; to the tune of:
Haydn sonata in G and
Bach sonata No. 2 in Etflat
Performed by Flutist NANCY WARING
and Pianist HEIDI HARVEY.
at 8:00 p.m. THURSDAY, 9-28
in
GREENE LOUNGE, East Quad
HI-CLASS MUNCHIES-QUICHE LORRAINE

Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Rafael
Fruehbeck de Burgos, Guest Con-
ductor. Sunday, Sept. 24, at 2:30
p.m. Hill Auditorium. Choral Union
Series of the University Musical
Society. Beethoven-"Egmont" Over-
ture, Op. 84 and Symphony No. 8
in F major, Op. 93. Wagner--Ex-
cerpts fromDero Ring des Nibelun-
gen.
By DONALD SOSIN'
If some talented actors were
made to work with an undistin-
guished director for years upon
end, one might suppose that they
would lose, interest in their work
and the quality of the perform-
ances would suffer. The same
appears to be the case with the
Detroit Symphony, once a fine
performing organization, with ex-
cellent recordings to their credit.
For the past ten years their
musical director and regular con-
ductor has been Sixten Ehrling,
who, the remarks in the program
book notwithstanding, has done
much to damage the orchestra's
musicianship, as well as their
attitude about playing, judging
from what one sees and hears
during concerts.
And the efforts of a top-notch
guest conductor were not enough
to rouse them out of habits evi-
dently well ingrained during
Ehrling's tenure. Hopefully, the
new Principal Conductor, Aldo
Ceccato, who begins a two-year
appointment next season, will be
able to correct the situation.

The concert, then, was not a
very exciting one. The program
was standard; I was very happy
to hear the Beethoven symphony
again, though. An example of the
composer in one of his lightest,
wittiest moods, it seems a sure
reference for that twentieth cen-
tury classicist and wit, Proko-
fiev, and kept me chuckling.
Fruehback de Burgos' conduct-
ing was a show in itself, as he
pivoted and wheeled on the po-
dium, directing most of his at-
tention to the violins and cellos;
the bassoonist could have used
some help, too, but I think most
of the sloppy playing is attribut-
able to bad habits. Obviously,
one guest conductor is not going
to shake these, and I was sur-
prised that Fruehbeck coaxed as
much from the group as he did,
even in the Wagner music, most
of which was deadly but which
had some truly exciting mo-
ments, especially in the closing
scene from Goetterdaemmerung.
That the orchestra enjoyed
working with Fruehback was
evident-not only was there vig-
orous bow tapping at the end, but
some musicians were even ap-
plauding him, not a common
sight. If they are given the
chance to work over a long
period with someone as talented
and inspiring, they may once
again become one of the nation's
first-rank orchestras.

i
t
t
s
f
t
o
tC
t
r.
d
h
c
s
s
w
t
t
j
Xl

in her own room, but awing to
he subtlety of the makeup in
his movie, one cannot tell if
he is dead or is having a mud
acial.
During the course of the film,
he baron marries several wo-
nen, and does away with all but
ne. This woman (Joey Heather-
on) he truly loves, and he la-
ments the fact that, after she
[iscovers what has happened to
her predecessors, he must kill
her, too. But, being surprisingly
crafty in her own inane fashion,
he stalls for time and engages
him in rudimentary psychoanaly-
is. He tells her everything, while
we' see everything. The women
were monsters, he claims; one
would endlessly sing to him, one
urned lesbian before his very
eyes, one constantly talked b.iby
alk and had breasts that were
ealous of each other, and one,
whom he met as a nun, was end-
essly confessing to him her car-
nal sins. "You must understand,"
he says, "I had to kill them!"
Heatherton understands. "What
else could you do?" she replies.
But before long the strag-
gling blond has it all figured out:
Yes! There was a reason why
the baron's dead mother w a s
locked in that room. The baron
killed his wives because he could
only love his mother! "You're
the monster!" she screams,
whereupon he puts her in cold
storage. He, in uniform, t h e n
joins his comrades to await a
train. From out of the 3hadows
comes a Jewish violinist who has
been tracking him throughout the
movie. The musician fires his
gun, and Burton goes down, cry-
ing, "Its absurd! Its ridiculous!"
Truer words were never spok-
en.
As it is supposedly a sex and
violence movie, Bluebeard has
an "R" rating. The sex, how-
ever, is far from pornography
(hence an "R" and not an "X"),
and the violence, which may have
been macabre in concept, hardly
makes one flinch. Both, in fact.
simply provide new sources of
humor. A "G" rated version of
the film was shot simultaneous-
ly with the "R" version for the
purpose of release to television.
This means the baron's girls will
have to die with their clothes on,
a sacrifice worth millions.
What saves Bluebeard f r o in
being an embarrassing movie and
makes it an entertainingly poor
one instead, of course, is Richard
Burton. Watching him in t h i s
farce calls for an extraordinary
suspension of disbelief. To be
sure, the puzzle of his appear-
ance is the film's only lasting ef-
fec..L

Mai

0

I

Cheech and C hng
Satire team Cheech and Chong hitching their way from EMU
where they pleased audiences last Saturday to Ann Arbor where
they are scheduled to perform in Hill Aud. on Oct. 7.
POETRY-the UGLI opens the doors of its multipurpose
room for the first poetry reading sponsored by the Uni-
versity's Extension Service and English Department to be
held there this semester. Reading this afternoon at 4:10
is Andrew Carrigan, who spent the last year in England
on a teaching exchange and now teaches at Huron High
School. His first book of poems, Book 3, was published
in August.
FILMS-Ann Arbor Film Co-op will feature Antonioni's
Blow-up tonight in Aud. "A" at 7 and 9:30 while Cinema
Guild features Bunel's Los Olvidados in the -Arch. Aud. at
7 and 9:05. Also, the women's studies film series presents
Women Rebels in History in the UGLI multipurpose room
at 7.
* ~* 4
MUSIC-the University's School of Music offers a trumpet
student recital at 12:30 in the School of Music Recital
Hall and a concert featuring the University Symphony
Orchestra conducted by Theo Alcantara at 8 in Hill Aud.
Admission to both events is free.

tonight
6:00 2 News-LeGoff-Caputo Team
4 News-Local
7News-Bonds-McCarthy Team
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
6 News
6:30 2 News-Cronkite
4 News-Chancellor
7 News-Smith-Reasoner
8 Jeannie
6 News-Cronkite
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News-Russell Team
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
6 Jeannie.
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 You Asked For It
7 The Parent Game
9 The Protectors
6 Dragnet
8:00 2 Maude
4 Bonanza
7 Temperatures Rising
9 World Hockey SPECIAL.
(Taped) Canada vs. U.S.S.R.
at Moscow. (Runs to 10:30
P.m.)
6 Maude
8:30 2 Hawaii Five-O
7 ABC Movie
"Moon of the Wolf" (Made-
For-TV P re mi e re), David
Janssen, Barbara Rush, Brad-
ford Diiliman, John Beradino.
Suspense thriller about a
modern - day werewolf who
terrorizes a Louisiana town.
6 Hawaii Five-O
9:00 4 The Bold Ones
9:30 2 CBS Movie
"Deadly Harvest" (Made-For
TV Premiere), Richard
Boone, Patty Duke, Michael,
Constantine. Former Freedom
Fighter defected from an Iron
Curtain country finds his
past catching up with him.
6 CBS Movie
10:00 4 NBC Reports
7 Marcus Welby, M.D.
10:30 9 News-National; Local
11:00 2 News-LeGoff-Caputo Team
4 News-Local
7 News-Bonds-McCarthy Team
11:30 2 Movie
"Underworld U.S.A. 61, Cliff
Robertson, Dolores Darn, Bea-
trice Kay. Boy plans revenge
for his father's murderers.
7 Dick Cavett.
9 Movie
"Wings of Fire," '67, Suzanne
Pleshette, Lloyd Nolan, James
Farentino, Juliet Mills, Ralph.
Bellamy. Woman enters a
competitive race to save her
father's struggling air freight
service.
1:30 2 Movie
"Neath Brooklyn Bridge," (B)
'42, East Side Kids.

I I

The conversation is so good
at the
LSA Coffee Hour
even the

i
{

MUMMIES
join i
Next LSA Coffe Hour at
THE KELSEY MUSEUM
(opposite Angell Hall)
3:00-4:30
Tuesday
Sept. 26

THINKING OF LIVING
IN A FRATERNITY
NEXT YEAR?
Let Us Show You Around
CHI PHI
1530 Washtenaw
GOOD FOOD PARTIES
SPORTS NICE ROOMS
RUSH DATES: Sept. 24-28, 6-10:30 p.m.
Information? Call 761-5020
Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

L

in-

i

SHOP THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
9:30 A.M. TO 9:00 P.M.
get with the tight bodyshirt
of carefree, comfortable
move-with-you polyester knit. .a
7-button front classic casual
with smooth, close fit through
body and sleeves. Navy, wine,
hickory or green. Sizes S,M,L. $11.

ieu.--
1S
mm'. izza
would like to introduce a new item
to their menu .
M RIPE OLIVES
Order any pizza with one item or
more and you can have
Ripe Olives or Green Olives FREE?
upon request
offer good Tues., Sept. 26-Sun., Oct. 1 769-8030 FREE DELIVERY
Looking for Something More?
REPORTERS
PHOTO GRAPHERS
ADVERTISING PERS ONNEL
are needed to launch the
The News is a campus publication covering student
life, student organizations and University events.
Inzterested? Comec to our

3:02 Death Valley Days
Oct. 6-8 p.m.
3.50, 4.50,5.50
BOWEN FIELD HOUSE
E.M.U.-YPSILANTI
TICKET OUTLETS: Ypsilanti-
McKenny Union; Huckleberry
Party Store, (2872 Washte-
now); DEARBORN-Ron Henry
Music (Tel-Ford Plaza); ANN
ARBOR - Music Mart (State
St.), WAAM Radio Broadcast
House; DETROIT-Hudson's.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Chuck Berry
5th Dimension
Nov.10
Mail Orders send self-addressed
stamped envelope to M.E.C.,
Office of Student Life, 3rd Floor,
McKenny Union
DIAL 668-6416
WINNER 1972 CANNES
FILM FESTIVAL
JURY PRIZE AWARD
Only American File
to be so Honored

:: : ;:
w:.

i """""""1"1""" M . .M.... . . . . ............

aa--

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan