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September 20, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 20, 1972

TwcTHE IC~iAN DiLY ednsday Sepembe.20.197

Attention prospective
syncronized Swimmers
Michifish practices
SEPT. 20, 27; OCT. 4-7 p.m.
MARGARET BELL POOL

s'

poetry and prose

11

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM

Ready for Rudolph

BrodsOky
By BRUCE SHLAIN his voic
The University's new poet-in- English
residence, Iosif Brodsky, said by pect the
many to be the Soviet Union's. boring a
finest living poet, gave she long- but this
awaited first reading of his case.
poetry here last night at Rack- For
ham Auditorium. Russian
The usual intimate 'and relaxed commen
atmosphere of the readings was S. Eliot
noticeably absent, for it was not aggerat
only Brodsky's University debut, seemed
but the first time he has read in a beaut
the United States. Coupled with that qu
the fact that most of his poetry seldom
has not yet been published in remind
English, the affair took on more of his li
swank than usual. And with the what w:
swank comes t e n s i o n, bright the cot
lights, and even w h i r r i n g always
cameras. Hardly a conducive it was 1
setting for the medium. showing
In addition to the aforemen- ing, pe
tioned obstacles, Brodsky's pro- demons
ficiency in English only allowed that his
him to read the poems in his unifying
native language. Prof. Donald Thet
Hall, sporting a beard and with ject-wis

reads

Organist to accompany
Valeni no's Son of Shiel'

e in fine timbre, did the
renditions. One would ex-
e Russian versions to be
and difficult to sit through,
s was certainly not the
when Bordsky read the
version of the first poem,
-morating the death of T.
t, the effect was (no ex-
ion) mesmerizing. He
to half-sing the words in
tiful cadence, in a voice
ivered with emotion but
faltered. One had to be
ed of the uprooted nature
ife these last few weeks,
Kith being expelled from
untry that he says "will
be my home." Perhaps
the uprootedness that was
g in his impassioned read-
rhaps it was his way of
trating the importance
s poetry has assumed in
g his life somehow.,
tone of the reading sub-
e was generally quite

By DONALD SOSIN
There aren't many theater or-
gans left in America. During the
height .of their popularity, in the
late 1920's, there were thousands
of them - Wurlitzer ,produced
about" 2,700, some companies
even more. Now there are only
twenty-five or so instruments
left in' playable condition, and
one of them is on Liberty St. in
the Michiga.n Theater.
It 'was used for concerts and
to accompany silent films for
several years after its installa-
tion in 1928, but the arrival of
talkies cut short its usefulness,
and it fell into a state of disre-
pair. Recently, the Motor City
Theater Organ Society has been
at work restoring it, and the re-
sults can be, heard at 8 tonight
as Lyn Larsen accompanies the
classic Rudolf Valentino film,
Son 'of the Sheik.
Tickets, at $3.00, are available
at the Michigan theatre box of-
Kaleidoscope
questions and
answers in the
world of art
. .- .. .. "

fice.
Larsen is a 27-year-old Califor-
nian who has toured this country
and Australia playing movie
shows and concerts for about
five years. Talking with him yes-
terday at the theater, I asked
whether he used original 1920's
music for the film.
"No,.about 85 per cent of the
music is my own. Occasionally I
get ideas from old pieces, espe-
cially the French organ compos-
ers, and I have always used a
theme of Franck's for Mary Phil-
bin in Phantom of the Opera, but
generally the themes are mine.
"Do I write the music down?
No, I'm so forgetful that I
would lose it everywhere. So I
memorize it. Not every note, of
course, but the basic content
changes verylittle from show-
ing to showing."
"And you can remember all
the individual themes for each
film? How many films have you
scored?"
Problems with musical instru-
ments, photography, painting,
macrame, food preparation, etc.
KALEIDOSCOPE to the rescue.
The Daily Arts page plans to
initiate this new column as a
,service to answer your questions
about problems in the world of
art. Inquiries may concern any
aspect of artistic technique,
equipment care, or local cultural
events.
If you have a question that
you would like answered, write:
KALEIDOSCOPE, c/o Arts Edi-
tor, The Michigan Daily.

here

TAKE A, TRIP
THIS FALL
At
HURON RIVER
CANOE RENTAL
FEATURING
2 AND 4 HOUR
RIVER TRIPS
4325 JACKSON AVE.
Phone 662-1270

"About 30," Larsen replied.
Most of the silent films in Ann
Arbor are shown at Cinema
Guild with piano music. I asked
Larsen about the difference be-
tweensaccompaniments on the
two instruments.
Piano music was originally
just music during the film, while
the organists actually accompa-
nied the events on the screen."
The same is done today with
piano accompaniments, too. "I
can play two measures of a
theme and you'll know pretty
much what's going on even if
you're eyes are closed."
IHe sat down at the organ and
played some ominous chords
that conjured up an image of the
villain entering, switched to a
romantic melody, and finished
up with a Sunday-afternoon
stroll-through-the-park tune. The
variety of differents effects' was
enormous, and there is no doubt
that the advantages to organ
accompaniment are many. (Son
of the Sheik will be shown at
Cinema Guild in November with
piano music for those who wish
to compare.)
The show tonight will include,
rin addition to the feature at-
traction, a sing-along anda solo
on the Barton organ. Larsen
says it is in excellent condition,
and judging from the brief ek--
cerpts I heard, the performance
should be most impressive.

somber except for one humorous
poem sprinkled with German.
Other than that, most of the
lines were stark and cold; in
"Still Life," perhaps the most
moving of the night's offerings,
he spoke of all talk as ". . . a
barren thing, a writing on the
wind." Such lines were part of
a general introspectionthat bor-
dered at times on misanthropy
("People are not my thing").
Brodsky seemed generally gen-
uninely surprised by the warm
reception, joking that Russian
was a very strange language,
and that he had decided that the
overflow crowd has "come to
hear the noise."
t~ton modern Coatin
TONIGHT ONLY AT
8:00 P.M.
Lyn Larsen
IN PERSON
at the Giant
Barton Organ
ON SCREEN
Rudolph Valentino
in the 1926 film
"SON OF THE SHEIK"

MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW

THE U-M PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
USHER APPLICATION
FOR
THE PLAY-OF-THE-MONTH SERIES
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE _ U-M ID NO.
I wish to usher for (indicate choice of series, 1st,
2nd, 3rd, 4th)

t

Series A_
(Sat. Eves.)

Series B_
(Sun. Eves.)

Series C_ .. Series D
(Sat. Mats.) (Sun, Mats.)

I

"Sleuth"
"The Effect of
Gamma Rays"
"Godspell"
"Applause"
"Story Theatre"

BIMBO'S. ON- THE HILL
(THE OLD VILLAGE INN)
OPEN 4 P.M. DAILY, including Sunday
DANCE TO

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Sat., Oct. 21
Sat., Dec. 2
Sat., Jan. 27
Sat., Mar. 24
Sat., Apr. 14

Sun., Oct. 22
Sun., Oct. 3
Sun., Jan. 28
Sun., Mar. 25
Sun., Apr. 15

REPORTING TIMES: 2 p.m. matinees; 7 p.m. evenings
Sign-up for Repertory Series will be handled separately.
This application MUST BE MAILED AND POSTMARKED NO
EARLIER THAN SEPTEMBER 26. U.S. MAIL ONLY. ONE AP-
PLICATION PER ENVELOPE AS PLACES ARE LIMITED. YOU
MUST BE A U-M STUDENT TO USHER.
MAIL TO: -RTP Office
Mendelssohn Theatre
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
Please include a self-addressed stamped envelope to expedite
notification.

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OPEN 12:45
SHOWS 1-3-5-7-9 P..

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WEDNESDAY thru SUNDAY at 9:00

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LYN LARSEN at the
BARTON PIPE ORGAN
accompanying the 1926 Silent Film Classic
"The Son of the Shiek"
starring RUDOLPH VALENTINO
plus SING-ALONG and POP-CONCERT
WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 20

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