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September 20, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Wednesday, September 20, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

" .... ,

CINEMA
We are showing a lot oft
rngmar Bergman's films
this term. Here is your
chance to see (or review)
the film which made this
director world famous.
TUES./WED.
T THE SEVENTH,
SEAL
MADE IN 1957
THUR.:
AMERICAN
UNDERGROUND
RETROSPECTIVEw
-Program 2
7 and 9.p.m,
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
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i4-
DIAL 668-6416
Today is Bargain Day
WINNER 1972 CANNES
FILM FESTIVAL
JURY PRIZE AWARD
Only American Film
to be so Honored

Military
f unds bil
in Senate
WASHINGTON s(R The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee re-
vived the foreign-military-aid au-
thorization bill yesterday and set
the stage for the third 1972 senate
floor test of sentiment on cutting
off funds for the war in Indochina.
After loping $581 million from
the House-passed authorization
measure, the committee adopted
anew an end-to-the-war amendment
sponsored by Sen. Edward Brooke
E (R-Mass.).
It would cut off funds for U.S.

Lavelle named

in

unauthorized

bombing strilkes
DENVER UP)-Three of four senators investigating unau-
thorized bombing strikes against North Vietnam said yester-
day that former Seventh Air Force commanding Gen John
Lavelle apparently was the highest officer involved in or-
dering the raids.
However, Armed Servlces Committee Chairperson John
Stennis, (D-Miss.), said he did not know when his group
would issue its final report to the Senate on the bombing case
or on the nomination of Gen. Creighton Abrams as Army
chief of staff.
The preliminary opinions that Lavelle was the apparent
top source of orders for unauthdrized air raids came following
a two-hour, closed-door hearing with Maj. Gen. Alton Slay,
La ' frv,.normer d Aiity hiP f4 ---__

I

KURT'
VONNEUT JR'S
GREAT NOVEL

forces in Indochina within f o v r
months after passage, conditioned
on release of prisoners of war and
an accounting for Americans re-
ported missing in action.
The Senate adopted the 3. 1 ti e
amendment by a 49-47 vote on Aug.
2 after it had been tacked on to a3
military-procurement authoriza-
tion bill. It was eliminated by a
House-Senate conference commi'-
tee.
The House had voted to authorize
$2.131 billion for military foreign

AUnivesaIPicture TECHNICOLOR' 1

AP Photo
Four members of .the Senate Armed Services Committee arrive in Denver yesterday to question
Major Gen. Alton Slay about unauthorized bombing raids against North Vietnam. From left: Sen.
Peter Dominick (R-Colo.), committee chairman Sen. John Stennis (D-Miss.), and Sen. Barry Gold-
water (R-Ariz.) The fourth member, 3ea. Harold Hughes (D-Iowa) is standing behind Se. Dom-
inick.

--

Everyone Welcome!

aid, compared with administrati.n
requests totaling $2.251 billion. 1iHe
Senate committee allowed $1.55 bi1. PACKAGED BOMB:
lion in recognition of Senate re ec-

'IO Urrrr

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
Wednesday, Sept. 20
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
OUTSIDE ON THE TERRACE

"io" of a si.82-bii1on autnoizatIn.
by a 48-42 vote on July 24,

Fun, Food, People
NEW PEOPLE WELCOME!
LAST DAY OF SALE
WAH R'S BOOK STORE.
316 S. State St.
Absolute Cea rance
10,000 BOOKS LEFT, PAPERBACK AND HARDBACK
SUPPLIES, SHELVES
-EVERYTHING MUST GO-
Open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Sat.,
0
BORDER'S BOOK SHOP IS COMING)

Rejection of the earlier bill in
the Senate followed adoption of an
amendment for troop withdrawal
from Indochina by a 50-44 vote.
The House three times this year
has refused to accept an Indochina
troop-withdrawal deadline, the last
208-160 vote coming Sept. 14 on
an amendment to the defense ap-
propriation bill.
The funding authorized in t h e
Senate committee action is below
the levels of the House authoriza-
tion bill and its companion appro-
priation bill in all categories of se-
curity, assistance.
The bill to be brought to the Sen-
ate floor would allow during the
comning year $500 million for mi~i-
tary assistance grants, $550 million
for supporting assistance and $400
million in military credit s a I e .
In addition $100 million would be
authorized for additional relief p.o-
jects for Bangladesh.
The House plans to take up its
appropriations bill today or to-
morrow and complete action on it
this week.

By The Associated Press
An Israeli diplomat was killed
yesterday by a booby-trapped
parcel delivered to his embassy
in London.
British postal authorities in a
sorting office found four more
packets containing explosives last
night, all addressed to officials at
the Israeli Embassy. The ex-
plosives were defused.
The Israeli Embassy in Paris
also received two explosive par-
cels, but they were dismantled.
The booby-trapped mailings
came on the heels of the Israeli
raid into Lebanon which r a s
aimed at destroying Palestinian
guerrilla bases. The Israeli gov-
ernment vowed that those respon-
sible for the death of the London
diplomat "will meet their just
desserts."
The mailed bombs indicated

that Israel's strike against Arab
guerrillas in Lebanon had not
ended the terrorist war against
Israel.
In another Middle East develop-
ment, authorities in Syria ar-
rested a U.S. military officer and
possibly will seek to exchange
him for Syrian soldiers cap!tred
by the Israelis.
Soon after the morning cxplos-
ion in the London embassv, 1-e
Lebanese Embassy there said it
received an anonymous telephone
call warning: "You will be next.-
The Lebanese government ha
been trying to curb guerrilla ac-
tivities inside Lebanon.
Scotland Yard launched an in-
ternational hunt for the assassins,
and suspicion centered mainly on
the Black September group of
Palestinian guerrillas who mur-
dered 11 members of the Israeli
Olympic team in Munich.
Both the London and Faris
bombs were postmarked mi Hal-
land, officials said. The bombs
U-M BARBERS
and HAIRSTYLISTS
Custom Haircuts
MICHIGAN UNION

were mailed in similar large,
bulky envelopes.
Shachori was the first Israeli
official murdered in Britain.
West German security officials
were believed checking whether
the London bombing was con-
nected to threats by Arabs in
West Germany 17 days ago that
death packages would be mailed
to German Jews and Israeli dip-
lomats.
Diplomatic sources in Beirut
said Syria may be holding Maj.
Richard Barratt, an assistant
military attache of the U.S. Em-
bassy in Amman, Jordan, in
hopes of winning freedom for five
Syrian officers captured by Israel
in June.
Barrett, of Laramie, Wyo., was
arrested Sept. 9 while on his
way from Jordan through Syria
to Beirut. Officials of the U.S.
Embassy in Beirut reported his
arrest Monday.
The officials said no reason
was given for his arrest a n d
that they didn't know where in
Syria he was being held.
The diplomatic sources in Bei-
rut said there hadn't been any
hint from Syria that Barrett was
being held for an exchange. But
they added that pending some
word to the contrary from Syria,
this was a likely supposition.

Israeli ,diplomat assassinated
as terrorist activity spreads

of staff for operations.
Stennis - with Sens. Peter
Dominick, (R-Colo.), Barry Gold-
water, (R - Ariz.), and Harold
Hughes, (D-Iowa) - took Slay's
wheelchair testhnony at Fitzsim-
ons General Hospital, where Slay,
who now heads the special train-
ing command at Lowry Air Force
was said to be recovering from a
Sept. 11 hernia operation.
Stennis was the only one of the
four senators who refused to com-
ment directly on the ultimate re-
sponsibility for the raids.
Dominick said that, according to
the testimony of Slay and others,
he felt that higher authorities nev-
er were told of Lavelle's new rules
for engaging the enemy. Hesaid
such orders were, "only passed
down to wing commanders and
subordinate officers."
Hughes said there was "no evi-
dence implicating anyone else"
higher up the chain of command.
Asked by reporters if Lavelle
could be labeled the "bad guy" in,
the case, Goldwater replied that
one would "assume that Gen. La-
velle could come under that title."
Stennis said Slay told the sena-
tors Lavelle made it clear to him
in conversations, but without writ-
ten orders, that, each time U.S.I
pilots flew over North Vietnam,I
they were to react as if there were
hostile actions by the North Viet-;
namese even if there were none.
Slay, according to Stennis, also
said he was receiving accurate re-
ports on what happened during the
unauthorized raids while falsified
reports were filed through regular
channels.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-F
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

N.Y. Rep.,
i i
fights in
second try
By The Associated Press
Former Rep Allard Lowenstein
(D.-N.Y.) won a second shot yes-
terday at Rep. John Rooney (D-
N.Y.) in a tightly regulated court-
ordered special Democratic par-
ty primary in New York City
that barely upstaged ardently
contested primaries in Massa-
chusetts.
Rooney, a fourteen-term mem-
ber of the House, fought for his
political life after state courts
found last June 20's Democratic
primary marked by "irregularis-,
ties."
Overseeing the election were
assistant state attorneys general
assigned to each of the district's
60 polling places. Rooney won
the June 20 contest by 890 votes,
but the courts found 1,920 irreg-
ular ballots of the 29,562 cast and
ordered a new election.
In Massachusetts, interest cen-
tered on a challenge to Demo-
cratic Rep. Louise Day Hicks in
Boston's reapportioned 9th Dis-
trict, a House seat bid by anti-
war Vietnam veteran John Kerry
in the 5th District.
Hicks who was defeated twice
in attempts to be mayor of Bos-
ton, ran a bitterly fought cam-
paign against state Sen. Robert
Cawley as she sought a second
term in Congress. -
Kerry, a onetime spokesman
for Vietnam Veterans Against the
War, waged a strenuous battle
against 10 opponents including
state Rep. Anthony DiFruscia,
whose campaign offices allegedly
were broken into Monday by
two Kerry workers including
Kerry's brother.

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
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SUNDAY: Jam Session
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