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April 19, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-04-19

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r
Thursday, April 19, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, Apr.il 19, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

30th Anniversary of the
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
An Evening in Memoriam
with
Rabbi Irwin Groner
Congregation Shaarey Zedekq

Prof. Herbert Paper
Dept. of Linguistics ('U-M)
On the first Seder night, in April 1943, the Jews in
the Warsaw ghetto took up arms against their Nazi
overlords. It was the beginning of an epic battle-
not for victory, as the resistance fighters knew from
the outset, but for the honor of their people. On the
wall of the Ghetto they posted an Eleventh Com-
mandment: "Thou shalt not despair" It was their
watchword and their-legacy.
We extend an invitation to the campus community
during the holiday of Passover, which marks the
liberation of the Jewish people from slavery, to
join us in memorializing the heroes and martyrs of
the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and of the Nazi holo-
caust,

JAZZ IN DETROIT
ARCHIE
ENSEMBLE
STRATA CONCERT GALLERY
APR. 20-21-22 9:30-2:00 FRI.-SAT 8:30 SUN.
TICKETS: STRATA 831-1666 (ADV. $4, AT DOOR $5)
DISCOUNT RECORDS, SOUTH UNIV.
An AAl Presentation with the Support of Michigan Council of the Arts
-
y ALLOW 4-6 WEEKS
FOR DELIVERY"
A cumulative exhibition of
contemporary popular art
Opening & Closing Reception
WED., APRIL 25, 8-10 p.m.
UNION GALLERY
1st floor, Miichigon Union-
N ~" ,

New
(Continued from Page 1)
Reports of impending
ments came from various qua
A source close to the Senate
cial Watergate investigating
mittee quoted sources with
Justice Department as
a b o u t eight persons pr
would be indicted soon.

Watergate
The Senate source said he had
indict- heard the indictments would in-
arters. clude charges of perjury, both at
's spe- the Watergate trial and before the
com- grand jury, and of illegal handling
in the of Nixon's campaign funds.
saying Those reportedly facing indict-
obably ment include present and former
members of the White House staff

and
sour
port

charges

t
ce
co

he Nixon
said. The
ould not be

campaign,
second-hand
confirmed.

Seale to vie in trun-off

(Continued from Page 1)
image needed to win an Oakland
mavoral election.
"The dress doesn't make any
difference," he said. "The people
see me as one who wants to end
their exploitation. That's real,
beyond the surface image. The
one that really counts."
Reading had described Seale
as "a worthy opponent who has
has run an admirable campaign."
He said Seale had conducted his
campaign "with dignity and earn-
ed my respect."
The mayor had campaigned on
his record in attracting new jobs
and business and had boasted of

the absence of major demonstra-
tions or riots in the city in re-
cent years. Seale had said "the
people see me as one who wants
to end their exploitation."
Seale is a registered Democrat,
Reading is a Republican. The of-
fice of mayor is a non-partisan
post.
The new Seale began to emerge
about the time the last of the
conspiracy charges against him
was dropped in September, 1972.
That was when a trial in which
he was charged in connection
with the slaying of a fellow
Panther ended in a hung jury at
New Haven, Conn.

AIDES MAY BE INDICTED

In other Watergate develop-
ments:
-Democratic Chairman Robert
Strauss said Republicans are in-
dicating guilt in the Watergate
case by offering a reported $525,000
to settle a multimillion-dollar pack-
age of lawsuits arising from the
wiretapping. A spokesman for the
campaign organization said the
offer didn't necessarily admit guilt
but conceded that the settlement
would favor the Democrats.
-The former finance chairman
for Nixon's campaign, Maurice
Stans, arranged a meeting with
lawyers for Common Cause, a non-
partisan citizens group suing Stans
and the Nixon campaign for ' full
disclosure of its secret finances.
Common Cause lawyer Mitchell
Rogovin struck a tough bargaining
posture. "We want them all," he

said, referring to Nixon's campaign
financial records.
-Democratic lawyers requested
that Martha Mitchell, wife of for-
mer Atty. Gen. John Mitchell, ap-
pear in New York next May 3 to
give sworn testimony in the Water-
gate lawsuits. She was requested
to bring any records or documents
she may have in her possession
bearing on the Watergate burglary
or on James McCord, the Water-
gate wiretapper who once served
as bodyguard to the Mitchell
family.
Sen. Sam Ervin (D-.N.C.) said
yesterday he is satisfied with the
arrangement under which White
House aides will appear befote a
committee investigating the Water-
gate bugging case.
"But I'm not going to do any
bragging," Ervin said. "I always
rejoice when anyone wandering in
error finds the way back to the
right path."

likely

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
' + 5rr .:: =' c :% ;7 ' '.t.v; .'.:: ,: ::. " ,:::r"rx "">:::;r :.e ;.t v

- - i

8 pam. THURSDAY, April 19
at HILLEL, 1429 Hill

The

"MN'ini"

r

I

Center for AfroAmerican and African Studies
FALL, 1973, CAAS COU RSE OFFERINGS AND SCHEDULING
KEY: Division No Course No Class No. Credit Hrs. TITLE Prerequisites Class Type
Day & Time Location Instructor.

In
o Special "Mini Semester" at The University of
Michigan-Dearborn (May 7-June 9) . . Pick-
up Extra Credits Before the Summer Job Begins
Courses in Education, Psychology, Geog-
raphy and Economics . . . For Information on the
Mini" as well as Regular Spring and Summer
Courses in Liberal Arts, Education, Business Ad-
ministration and Engineering . . .

THURSDAY, APRIL 19
DAY CALENDAR
Future Worlds Final Lurecte: P. Tar-
noff, environ. designer, "The Science
of Creative Intelligence: Why Wait Till
Tomorrow!" Aud. 3, MLB, 3 pm.
Inst. of Gerontology: C. Brache,
"Continuing Education;" V. VanCoev-
ering, "Widowhood;" R. Graham, "Mi-
nority Problems;" 3330 Med. Sci. I, 3
pm.
Dental School & Res. Inst.: N. John-
son, London. Engl., "Ultr.structure of
the Caries Process" 1033 Kellogg. 4 pm.
Ctr. for Early Childhood Dev.-Educ.:
P. Levenstein, "Five Years of the Ver-
bal Interaction Project: Summary of
Res, on the Mother-Child Home Proj.,"
Aud. B, Angell, 4 pm.
Statistics: P. Krishnaiah, Aerospace
Res. Labs, "Tests for the Equality of
Covariance Matrices," 429 Mason Hall,
4 pm.
Music School: C. Edward, organ, or-
gan studio 2110, SM, 4:30 pm.
American Heritage Night: foods of
the American northwest, League cafe-
teria, 5 pm.
Dance Dept.: "TREK", indoor-out-
door dance theatre, E. Quad, 7 pm.
Music School: New music for orches-
tra & choir, U Philharmonia & Cham-
ber Choir, Hill, 8 pm.
Music School: Gamelan, Rackham
Aud., 8 pm.
Music School: K. Miller, cello, SM

Recital Hail, 8 pm.
Rive Gauche: Int'l coffee hour, 1024
Hill St., 8 pm.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 SAB
Interview: Excellent Opportunity for
5 students for college summer program
to call on univs. and schools of nurs-
ing throughout U.S. 15 week prog.
Guaranteed salary $1750. All expenses
paid. Will interview here Mon., Apr. 23,
9:30 to 5 pm. Register by phone or in
person:
Announcements: Large resort seeks
individual entertainment / sports or-
Tented. Must own instrument. Excel-
lent salary plus room and board and
bonus. Further details at 212 SAB.
Federal Correction Inst., Milan, Mi.
Undergrad. and grad students in social
work, criminology, criminal justice,
law, psychology, or education. Limited
number from bus. ad., personal ad-
min., public admin. Deadline Apr. 27.
Williams Research Corp., Walled
Lake, Mi. Openings for undergrads and
grads in aeronautical eng.
Associates Financial Planning and
Control Co., South Bend, Ind. Opening
for graduate students in business ad.,
and industrial admin. Work would be
with the Corporate Planning Dept.
Black & Decker Mfg. Co., Detroit.
Opening for repairman for Lawn and
Garden Tools.- Must have some elec-
trical experience.

311/1001001 2/BLACK ENCOUNTER/Per Instr./Sem/M 7-9 P.M.
/TH 7 P.M./414 M.H./Coppock. -
A learnng experience that emphasizes 1) understanding one's per-
sonal identity as determined by the American racial situation and
2) the formation of cohesive and effective groups.
311/200/001/2UG/ISSUES in BLACK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
in the CARIBBEAN and GUYANAS/Per, Instr./Lec/TTH 11/
Bynot and Staff.
This course is designed to acquaint students with issues relating to
the economic development of Black countries in the Caribbean and
the Guyanas. The objective is to examine from a Black perspective
some of the implications of those economic developments now con-.
fronting Blacks in this area of the Third World. Topics include U.S.
involvement in these areas, its impact, and future relationship in
the development of this area. This would include an examination of
such areas as Trinidad, Jamaica, Guyana, Surinam, etc.
311/201/001/4/SURVEY OF AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY I (HIS-
TORY) Per. Instr./Lec/TTH 1 P.M./A.H. AUD C/Hortn.
002 Disc/TTH 4 PM/2308 Chem.
003 Disc/WF 10/2443 M.H.
004 Disc/WF 12/407 M.H.
005 Disc/WF 1 PM/22 A.H.
006 Disc/WF 3 PM/2446 M.H.
007 Disc/WF 10/447 M.H.
008 Disc/WF 1 PM/2448 M.H.
A survey of dominant trends and personalities in the Black histori-.
cal experience in the United States from the 16th Century to the
present. The course also includes a brief description of relevant parts
of Africa and the beginning of the slave trade.
311/203/001 /4ISSUES in AFRO-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT
Per. Instr./Lec/TTH 1 PM/2029 A.H./Yates.
002 Disc/MW 11/2419 M.H.
003 Disc/MW 1 PM/2449 M.H.
A multi- and inter-disciplinary course concerned with the freedom
and development of the community of Black people along several
dimensions. Development implies change; we are concerned with the
kinds of changes that must be made if Black Anerica and, in turn,
America Itself-is to survive and prosper. The course will involve:
(1) surveying and analyzing various aspects of problems; (2) re-
viewing and criticizing proposed solutions to those issues; and (3
developing refined and alternative strategies through serious and co-.
operative study.
311/205/001/4/INTRODUCTION to AFRICAN HISTORY and
CULTURES I/Freshmen & Sophomores; upper-classmen may enroll
with permission of instructor/Lec/TTH 11/407 M.H./Enyia.
002 Disc/TTH 2 PM/3301 M.L.B.
003 Disc/TTH 12/1442 M.H.
004 Disc/WF 12/2449 M.H.
An interdisciplinary introduction to the history and cultures of
Africa. Historical and contemporary developments in Africa will be
examined against the background of world history and world affairs.
311/330/001/3/RACIAL and CULTURAL CONTACTS (SOCIOL-
OGY) See Catalog/Lec/WF 2-4 PM/429 M.H./Edwards.
Analysis of the implications of racial differences, the factors affect-
ing prejudice and discrimination, the structural aspects' of group
conflicts, and the possibilities of change in America and in other
societies.
311/332/001/3/BLACK THEATRE WORKSHOP I (SPEECH COM-
MUNICATION & THEATRE) Lec/MWTHF 2 PM/2528 F.B./Staff.
002 Lab/TTH 8/2518 F.B.
A beginning course in acting taught from a black perspective. The
first half of a two semester sequence (2 hrs. lecture, 4 hrs. voice
and movement lab)
311/360/001/ARTS OF BLACK FOLK I Disc/MW 9-I1/Trotter
House/Lockard.
A description and illustration of the origins, nature, and legitnacy
of contemporary Black art and its parent. African art
311/400/001/3/HISTORY OF AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC I Lec
MWF 1 PM/ ** /Stewart.
The History of Afro-American IMusic is a two-term course which
makes a complete historical survey of the important forms and
styles of Afro-American music found in the United States. This
course Is designed to acquaint the student with as much music as
possible; it leaves the politcal and sociological considerations for 465
311/402/+ /3G-4UG/COMMUNITY PROJECTS Per. Instr.
Indi/T 6-9 PM/1100 S. Univ./Simmons.
Individual projects and research centered around topics of interest
to Black people. Emphasis cn developing resource materials to sup-
plement public aschool education curricula,
e You must obtain FRONT. THE DPARTMENT the instructor's
name and class number, and enter them on your election card
311/403/001/3-4/POLITICS OF LIBERATION (POLITICAL SCI-
ENCE 409) Per. Instr,/Rec/MWF 9'2203 A.H./Robinson.
An historical and analytical examination of the role of oppressed
peoples in society ard their stuggle for liberation. Special sections
will deal with specific groups. (Section 001-- Concentrates on African
dispersion)
311/406/001/3-4 ANARCHISM & VIOLENCE (POLITICAL SCI-
ENCE) 2 courses in Pol. Sci, or Per. Instr./Rec/MWF 10/2003
A.H./Robinson.
An analysis of anarchism which seeks a new significance for tie
pejorative aspects of the thought and the movement. Emphasis will
be placed on the impact of consciousnes in the consideration of
violence and the roots of anarchism in European social and intelle-
tual history.
311/408/001/3-4 AFRICAN ECONOMIES IN THEIR SOCIAL &
POLITICAL SETTINGS I/Per. Instr./Lec./MWF 2 PM/ */Olopoenia
This course will analyze the various factors that have contributed
to the existing economic conditions in contemporary Africa It will
examine the problems of and potentis for econoi c cliange and
development on the African continent. It will be directed toward
meeting the needs of students who desire an understanding of Afri-

staff. The student, in electing, should name the staff member with
whom the work has been arranged.
} You must obtain FRON THE DEPARTMENT the instructor s
name and class number and enter them on your election card.
311 /414/001/2-3 EDUCATION OF THE MINORITY CHILD-
THE BLACK CHILD EDUCATION A SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS)
(no No. obtained from Educ.) /Lec./TH 1-3 PM/* /Simmons,
Focuses on the public school and the need for that institution to
create an atmosphere conducive to the educational needs of the
Black child. Studies the development of education for Black children
in this country and relates that experience to public school educa-
tion.
311/419/001/3/,WRITERS WORKSHOP Per. Instr./T 7-10 PM;
715 Haven St./Daois.
This course will study contemporary Black poets both politically and
technically. Students will also engage in editing, writing and criti-
cism of other expressive forms.
311/430/001/2 ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO BLACK EDU-
CATION/Per. Instr./Lec/TH 4-6 PM/715 Haven St./Williams.
A survey and evaluation of the underlying philosophies, directions,
objectives and methods of various approaches to meeting the edu-
cational needs of the Black world. Class activities will emphasize
the theoretical basis for the alternative approaches with a focus on
identifying skills, ideologies, and concepts needed for implementa-
tion through an integration of content and theory.

Contact:

Admissions Office
University of Michigan-Dearborn
4901 Evergreen Road
Dearborn, Michigan 48128
(313) 271-2300 ext. 511

D DONUT WHOLE
900 S. STATE (State & Packard)
WELCOMES YOU TO ENJOY
0 fresh donuts
* superb ice cream
9 refreshing liquids
Pick up fresh donuts for your morning coffee clutch

Open 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
Tuesdays-Sundays

Phone: 761-5161

3
1

11 447/001 /3G-4UG THE OLD CONGO KINGDOM & EUROPE:
482-1641 (Part I)/Per. Instr./Lec/MWF 10/ * /Johnson.
Introduce the student to the history of the Old Congo Kingdom,
show the beginning of Afro-European contacts: (a) the nature of
these contacts; (b) the reasons for European interest in the 'land
of Guinea'; (c) Congolese attempts to cooperation with the Euro-
pean, and the role of the Church in the first phase of European
colonialism: i.e., Cannon Law.

i .
_ _ ___._

- - -

311/ 449.001/2-4 GOVERNMENTS AND POLITICS OF AFRICA
(POLITICAL SCIENCE 451) See Catalog Rec/MWF 9/2429 M.H.
Somoff.

002
003

TH 7-9 PM 1412 M.H.
F 12/1512 C.C.L.

A comparative survey of the African states and territories, with pri-
mary emphasis on: the process of decolonization, the continued de-
pendent stattis of African states, obstacles .to change, and alterna-
tive strategies of development.
STUDENTS MAY ELECT SECTION 001 FOR 3-4 CREDITS OR SEC-
TION 002 FOR 2 CREDITS, SECTION 003 OPTIONAL FILM SERIES.
MAY BE ELECTED IN ADDITION TO SECTION 001 OR 002 AT NO
ADDITIONAL CREDIT)
311/450/001/3 BLACK COMMUNITIES AND LEGAL RIGHTS,
Per. Instr./Lec/TTH 6-8 PM/1408 M.H./Staff.
A historical description and discussion of various legal fictions cre-
ated in law to prevent Black people from attaining their constitu-
tonal right to full freedom and equality. The legaf aspects of the
Civil Rights militant movements. identification and discussion of
political prisoners and political trails, new approaches to affirmative
shits and class actions to achieve social and economic change for
the Black community; in service training in legal services.
311/465/001/4 "DYNAMICS OF AFRO-AMERICAN MUSIC. Per.
Instr. 400.401 /Lec MWF 9/204 B.M.T./Stewart.
The student will be presented with the major developments in
Afro-American music. He will then study their causes, effects, poli-
tical and sociological implications. This will not be a complete his-
torical survey; yet the student wil become familiar with much of
the important music.
311/476/001/3/'CONTEMPORARY AFRO-AMERICAN LITERA-
TURE (ENGLISH) Per. Instr./Lec/MWF 3 PM/2439 M.H./Johnson
A study of literature written by Afro-Americans from World War II
to the present. Wright. Yerby, Baldwin, Brooks, Hayden, Lee, and
Cleaver will be among the writers discussed.
311/497/001/4/UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR IN COMPARA-
TIVE & FOREIGN GOVERNMENT (POLITICAL SCIENCE) Per.
Instr./Sem/W 1-3 PM/2451 M.H./Samoff.
Selective topics in comparative and foreign government. (CONFLICT
IN SOUTHERN AFRICA,)
311/536/001/3-4/AFRICA IN THE 19TH CENTURY/HISTORY
Lec/MWF 11 /443 M.H./Uzoigwe.
This is a. general survey course dealing with such questions as the
Muslim Revolution and influence: state formation and change in
political scale; the European conquest and the Africans' reaction to
it; the erergence of a westernized elite in the Nineteenth Century
We-i Africa.
311/540/001/3/COMPARATIVE DECOLONIZATION (POLITI-
CAL SCIENCE) See Catalog/Rec T 9-11/433 P.A./Staff.
Examination of the transfer'of potitical power from imperial to col-
onial control and subsequent seterance of econonic ties between
the colonized and the colon ier
311 559'001/3-4/THE AMERICAN SOUTH (HISTORY 560)
Lec/MWF 9/2433 M.H./Owens.
A history of the Old South from 1776 to 1865. with empha sis placed
on political development sthe plantation systei, slaver, and the
role of Southerners in shaping American identity
311/577/001/3/!BLACK MOVEMENTS, LEADERS, TRENDS POST-
RECONSTRUCTION TO WORLD WAR 1I (HISTORY) Per. Instr./
Lec/W 7-9 PM/1437 M.H./Cruse.
Examination of Afro-American History as a problem in American
Historiography. The areas are leadership trends, organizations, per-
sonalities, and movements from Post-Reconstruction to World War II
311/586/001/3/COMMUNICATION, MEDIA, AND PROPAGAN-
DA REALITIES IN THE BLACK WORLD (JOURNALISM) Per.
Instr./Lec/WF 1-2:30 PM/3528 F.B./Martin.
A study of communication and information proce -es and technol-

SWELTERING in
Ann Arbor this summer?
then,

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01
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FFu

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ipc

ait~Igtan

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