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April 17, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, April 17. 1973

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Chavez leads strike

--FFF- - - --- F==

against rivt
COACHEI A\, Calif., (Reuter)-
Cesar Chavez's United Farm
Workers Union and the rival
Teamsters Union clashed openly"
yesterday as Chavez called a
strike in 15 vineyards signed by
the Teamsters Sunday.
Chavez's Union immediately
threw up picket lines around the
vineyards to try to dissuade im-
ported Mexican laborers and lo-
cal Chicanos from going to work
there.
The pickets urged w orkers to
cone out of the fields where they
were thinning vines in preparation
for May's harvest. Only a few
di .
The strike opened a new threat
of an international boycott of Cali-
fornia grapes, the method by
which Chavez won jurisdiction for
his union over the entire Californ-
ian table grape industry three
years ago.
But with contracts up for re-

a1 union

THE UNION GALLERY

I

Pres

sents

y

newal in this southern California
valley which produces 12 per cent
of the state's harvest, one group
of table grape growers announced
Sunday they wcrc signing with the
Teamsters.
Another group said they had
signe'd again with Chavez's union.
In a news conference Monday,
Chavez called a boycott against
"scab - picked" grapes, even
though the crop won't be picked
until next month.
He said the boycott w ould last
"just as long as it takes" to win
over the growers who have signed
with the Teamsters.

f
I,
I
iE

NUMBER 3: ONE WOMAN SHOWS

A

Paintings by BETH URDANG
Apri 27 through May 6
Opening Reception: Friday, April 20, 7-10 p.m.
GALLERY HOURS: Wed. through Sun. 12-5 p.m., Fri. eve. 1-0 p.m

1

-__. ._ .. +.... u

AP Photo
Woody Richards, an ousted resident of Wounded Knee, walks a roadblock outside the government
roadblocks leading to his village after the group of displaced residents vowed to stop food and medi-
cine from going into the seiged village. The roadblock only passes federal officers.
OAKLAND MAYORAL ELECTION:
Seale tops candidates

OAKLAND, Calif. () - Black! "The New Left and its cynical
Panther Bobby Seale is a leading allies have made a shambles of
contender to unseat Oakland's Re- Berkeley's government and are
publican mayor, and leftist-radi- driving business and payrolls out
cals could take control of Berke- of Berkeley. It must not happen
ley's City Council as voters ballot here."
today in the neighbor cities. In Berkeley, home of the Uni-
Clerks predicted a record voter versity of California, voters must
turnout in both Oakland and the choose between left-leaning liber-
university town of Berkeley, which als and further-left-leaning radi-

line the bay shores across from
San Francisco.
"The people are going to make
history in Oakland. I'm going to
win in a landslide," Seale said in
an interview yesterday.
Seale and Otho Green, a black
businessman, are posing a for-I
midable challenge to Oakland's
conservative Mayor John Read-
ing. If no one gets more than 50
per cent of the total vote, the top
two will face each other in a run-
off election May 15.
Reading himself calls Seale the
leading contender. The white in-
cumbent told a campaign luncheon
last week that Seale "has run an
admirable campaign and is a
worthy opponent."
Seale, who was organizing the
Black Panthers when Reading first
took office in 1966, is counting on
support from Oakland's black and
Chicano voters, who together are
55 per cent of the total.
Since announcing his candidacy
a year ago, Seale claims his 200
Panther registrars have signed up
more than 30,000 new voters in the
poorer neighborhoods of this- in-
dustrial city of 361,500 population.
City Clerk Robert Jacobson ex-
pects a 65 per cent voter turnout
because of the hot mayor's race.
Turnouts for city elections in past
years have averaged only 48 per
cent, he says.
Green, a mustachioed Democrat,
has attacked Reading as a "do
nothing" mayor who lacks leader-
ship and pecks away at Seale say-
ing he- andthe Panthers have "op-I
enly preached violence and defi-
ance of the law."
Reading hammered at the theme
of not turning Oakland into what
he calls "another Berkeley." He
says Oakland has had "no ma-
jor riots or demonstrations here
while they were occurring in 167
other U. S. cities." A newspaper
ad for Reading said:

f .+av y..aaya . aava avaa. av4l;ilaa 1 (A dl

cals running for four seats on the
nine-member City Council.
Because there already are three
council members who call them-i
selves "radicals," the radicalsI
need to win only two of the four
seats for a voting majority.c
The radical slate, which calls it-
self the "April Coalition" is run-'
ning against a "liberal-moderate"I
slate called the "Berkeley Four."r
The Berkeley Four says it rep-.<
resents everything "nonradical"?
and hopes to appeal to the city's

conservatives as the lesser of two
evils.
Voters in this' campus city of
117,000 also face ballot measures
that would require police to get
approval at the council's weekly
meeting before arresting mari-
juana smokers.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates; $10 by
carrier (campus area; $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Oho; $13 non-iocai mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip -
Lion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail otbe
states and foreign).

Must
Co-Eatus
Always
Be
Interruptus?
BEST FOREIGN
LANGUAGE
FILM 1973:
AImby
IsBuntie
ThE DISCREET
CHARM
OF TIE
BOURGEOISIE"

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNER

4TH HIT WEEK!
FEATURE PROMPTLY AT
1-3-5:05-7:05-9:10
No Short Subjects)
IN THELIFE AND TIMES OF
PG

HELP
~~ med atrics
MEDIATRICS, as part of UAC's attempt to become more
responsive to the students, is setting up an EXECUTIV9
BOARD.
Take part in MEDIATRICS 73-'74 film
scheduling and operation
For more info. CALL UAC, 763-1107
Deadline Wednesday
Dead--ne

3

i j" -1.

Sot, Sun. & Wed. of
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
Mon., Tue., Thur., Fri.
of 7 & 9 only

STACY KEACH
{ c;:- assa b

. I

I

BRUNO

TONIGHT-April 17
Robert Flaherty's
Louisiana Story
Lyrical documentary about a
Standard Oil development in a
Louisiana bayou.
Wednesday: 10 for 2
7 AND 9 ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM1

"Majestic Photography"
---Fifth Estate
2 SHOWS DAILY
7:20 & 9:30
76*-9700
2 Matinees Daily
:00 P.m. & 3:15 p m:
OOC3iSp
PLs CARTOONS
and "FLASH GORDON"

mediatrics
Last Film for this year
PATTON
7 & 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
NAT. SCI. AUD.
ONLY 75c Tickets on sale at 6 p.m.

4

PARAMOJUNT PICTURES, ts A FLM BY
FUrflCO ZeFFIreLLI
HIS FIRST FILM SINCE "ROMEO & JULIET"
iroTer Sor
siTner MOfn"

1973-74 Series on Sale

i

Ii

The Hewlett-Packard
'P-8

a

AFTER YELLOW

'I

COMPUTER CALCULATOR
(pre-g'rammed with 36 separate
financial capabilities)
THE MOST REVOLUTIONARY
BUSINESS DEVICE OF OUR TIME
-YOU MUST SEE IT-TO BELIEVE IT-
ULRICH'S BOOKSTORE 549 E. University Ave.

NEW WORLD FILM COOP

x '
::
:,,..,
" ,

VV I I " J

VII I I~I .1 U 1 I f/A \ - -ili~\A V~:~ ;-~\i- 2~N- 71 i -, I I - I ~n, I

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