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April 10, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-10

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" Tuesdcy, April 10, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, April 10, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

FILM FOCUS:*

r Pathe Panchali
Indian film director Satyajit Ray is, to my mind, one of
the world's ranking movie artists. His films constantly re-
ceive great critical acclaim.
Well the History Department is giving us a chance to
see Pather Panchali (The Song of the Road), Ray's first
film, a third of his brilliant Apu Trilogy, and a masterpiece in
its own right. The showing, by the way, is free. The movie
combines an almost Neo-Realist approach to rural Indian
village life at the beginning of this century with lyric, stun-
ning visuals, Ravi Shankar's richly evocative score, and,
most importantly, a poignant, marvelously complex under-
standing of human personality and experience. Ray's con-
cerns here are quite different from those of most films we
are used to: he is not interested in contrived action, but
rather attempts (with utter success) to convey an expansive
sense of the meanings of everyday events to a vividly three-
dimensional. Indian family. Witness, for instance, the en-
thralling sense of wonder Ray manages to wring from the
seemingly minor event of his young hero's seeing for the first
time, a train race through a neighboring meadow.
Ray uses for the most part non-professional actors (he
dredged up an opium-addicted old woman on the verge of
death to play the part of his central character's decript aunt
-which she does beautifully) and actual location settings;
yet he uses these elements to achieve a truly profound and
haunting vision of human life caught in the midst of a
violently changing India.
-RICHARD GLATZER
rAL0'e di tr ics
w ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF
IVAN DEN ISOVICH
7 & 9:30 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday
Not. Sci. Aud.
Only 75c Tickets on sale at 6 p.m.
r

Some
By MIKE HARPER
"Hiya boys and girls
Remember the 'late' sixties?
Yeah man, remember HIGH
ENERGY? Yeah bro', dig: KICK
OUT THE JAMS? 'Oh-my,' the
'Five'? Third Power? The
'Wheels'? Dick Wagner and the
Frost? The 'Station'? Seger?
Savage Grace? . . . ESS-AR-
CEE?
Yeah. Hey, remember
me? My name's 'Pop' Stooge and
I did a lil' thing called 'I Wanna
Be Your Dog'-
. . . So MESSED UP-I won-
cha here-
In MY ROOM-I won-cha
HERE-
NOW we're gonna be.. ..
FACE-TA-FACE
Ana LAY RIGHT DOWN in
muh
FAY-VO-RITE PLACE.. ..
An' now I wanna ... BE
YOUR DAWG!
An' now I wanna ... BE
YOUR DAWG!
An' now I wanna ... BE
YOUR DAWG!
... Wwwwwell C'MON!
Yeah, right.kBut it could
happen though, y'know? Some-
day, K-Tel or some other quick
$$ outfit just may throw together
and market a "The 'Motor City's
Burning' With Rock 'n' Roll"
tov.
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Fintstone~s
56 Operation second Chance
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 1IDream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 How Do Your Children Grow?
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 French Chef
7 30 2 What's My Line?
4 You Asked for It
7 Price Is Right
9 Bobby Goldsboro
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Earthkeepng
8:00 2 Maude
4 Movie
"Cool Million." (1972)
7 Temperatures Rising
9 HUFO
50 Dragnet
56 Threatened Paradise
8:30 2 Hawaii Five-O
7 Movie
56 Bill Moyer' Journal
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 9 News
11214's uivrsity
Theatre Phone 668-616
3RD HIT WEEK!
Today at 7 & 9 p.m.;
Wed. at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"CRIES & WHISPERS"

really
two- or three-record set, call it
Kick Out the Jams, Brothers and
Sisters! after the MCS's "killer"
anthem of almost-the-same name,.
and sell it for the mere pittance
of $4.95 suggested retail price
PLUS if you send NOW we'll
give you ABSOLUTELY FREE
the Up's Greatest Hits, Great
Moments With Who-Knows-Who,
Something-or-Other's Whatever
and ... YOU NAME IT.
. . . Okay, if such a 'dynamic
record offer' whets your appetite,
then the return of "A-Squared's"
famed Stooges in the guise of a
new album called Raw Power
(Columbia KC 32111) should just
about kick out your jams brother
or sister.
The title track itself opens with
a belch, as the rhythm section
stays stuck in a very basic riff
with the guitar following suit;
thus allowing Iggy to play the
trump with his chunky words-
Raw power got a healin' hand
Raw power can de-stroy a man
Raw power is the boilin' soul
Got a son called rock 'n' roll ...
"Search and Destroy" is an
offhandedly schizoid tune, as Iggy
sings "I'm the world's forgotten
boy/The one who searches and
destroys," lashing out at the
people who could have saved
him if the world would have only
56 Common Ground
9:30 To Be Announced
56 Black Journal
10:00 4 America
7 Marcus Welby, M.D.
50 Perry Mason
56 Detroit Black Journal
10:30 56 360 Degrees
11:00 2 47 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Movie
"Cry of the Banshee" (1970)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Haunting of Rosalind
50 Movie
"Carson City." (1952)
12:00 9 Movie
"The Chase" (1966)
1:00 4 7 News
1:15 2 Movie
"Up in Smoke" (1957)
2:45 2 TV High School
3:15 2 News
wcbn
89.5 fm
9:00 Morning Show
12:00 Progressive Rock
4:00 Folk

IRaw
paid him some 'oh-mind.' Musi-
cally, the drums are furstratingly
simple while the bass alternates
between trite and traumatic, the
guitar rightly taking its place in
minor league riffdom circles as
Iggy pouts, shouts and clouts
back with his always-memorable
street vocals.
A loud and ugly guitar charge
leads the musical pack into
"Your Pretty Face Is Going to
Hell," a track that shows signs
of the 'old' Iggy, as he growls his
way through the lyrics in that
most-familiar rasp of his. Guitar-
ist James Williamson's notes fly
off the frets every which way,
interfering with the dogged sim-
plicity of the bass and drums,
and for that matter, Iggy's vo-
cals, which somehow do remain
atop the Stooges' wall of sound.
"Gimme Danger" sounds slow-
er, a John Wayned rocker that
has Iggy playing the part of a
dried-up western stud, an old
cowboy movie star whose water-
ing hole has gone sour. The gui-
tar s o m e h o w remains light
throughout, though it is heavy-
handed nonetheles, played over
a basically blase rhythm pattern.
"I Need Somebody" is the al-
bum's lone ballad, as 'Pop' adds
his best, semi-sweet vocals to a
simple, re-worked light blues
number. The music remains
sleepy-sounding even in its most
inspired moments, the guitar laz-
ily filling holes while the broth-
ers Asheton-Ron and Scott-
fulfill their bass and drums
duties respectively.
An electric-"Woodstock"-ish in-
tro begins "Penetration," another
laid-back cut in which the band
is able to maintain their raw-
edged feeling without much if
any show of effort.The drums
sigh, breaking into a heartbeat
rhythm with the bass, as the
guitar 'then plays on' in a cau-
tious yet callous manner. Iggy's
vocals are breathless and ex-
aggerated, each repeat of the
word 'penetration' drawn almost-
painfully out until there is 'noth-
ing' left in any case.
Following another dead-serious
riff, Iggy is bouncing into some-
thing appropriately 1 a b e I e d
"Shake Appeal," an early-sixties
mindwar? of infintesimal charm
and grace that chugs right along,
ever the oh-mindless child. Iggy
is loud, raunchy or indifferent
depending on the moment-no
matter, he always has the sup-
port of his 'boogie' men to fall
back on, so it's ever-'on with the
show *-
The guitar leaps, the bass and
drums work off their frustrations
with a new riff, and it's off on a
Bowie-inspired "Death Trip," a
long and vamping tune that

ower'
proves to be the 'clincher' of this,
the Stooges' third album. The
music meanders nicely along,
Iggy gets his vocal licks in,
mumbling almost-incoherently in
his now-ice-cold, directing voice,
and then it's on into oblivion,
"going down in history" on his
'death trip.'
... If and when that 'someday'
comes for K-Tel to do their dirty
work and, in turn, cause a little
more of that ever-popular 'panic
in Detroit," Iggy & the Stooges'
Raw Power should prove to be
the sesence of that album, for it
is indeed the essence of street
music, Motor City rock 'n' roll.
Loud, raw and powerful, the
Stooges' third captures perfectly
the , simple and riff-conscious
sound that makes Detroit more
than 'just' Motown, U.S.A.
. . And even if it's high
energy, 'getting high, getting
naked and getting down' as one
Ann Arbor prophet once said, De-
troit's music culture is more--
it is an ugly and deformed child,
raised from the diseased bowels
of 'gasoline alley,' a broken-but-
never-beaten child best heard
and felt in the malevolent music
of Raw Power, the first high
energy album of the 'late seven-
ties.
Ata
By HARRY HAMMITT
Friday night Detroit was giv-
en a first taste of the newest
phase in British music with the
performance of Wishbone Ash,
backed up by Vinegar Joe.
Ex-James Gang guitarist Joe
Walsh and Barnstormin', a last-
minute addition to the bill, came
on first. I got the impression
from the emcee that the band
originated from the Detroit area
and their musical ambitions
seemed to bear this out. The
band, consisting of bass, key-
boards, drums, and Walsh on
guitar and vocals, plodded
through a fortunately short set
of uninspired heavy-handed rock
which seemed to delight in its
banality. Walsh's vocals were
indistinct, and undistinguished.
The rhythm section was rather
mediocre; the bass always seem-
ed to _be a dull thud, and the
drummer's thrashing often cau-
sed him to lose the beat. Noth-
ing can be said against the key-
board player, but nothing can be
said in his favor either. The mu-
sic was consistently dull, al-
though there wasa fairly nice in-
tense riff which appeared in sev-
eral songs, and was so super-
ficial that at least two songs
sounded exactly alike.

Story Theatre
Magical folk rock fables in song, dance and mime from Paul
Sills' STORY THEATRE will be presented this weekend as the
final Professional Theatre Program presentation this season.
ste *of Bri~tish

7:00
8:00
11:00
;3:00;

Sports
Rhythm and Blues
Progressive Rock
Sign Off
cable tv
channel 3

3:30 Pixanne
4:00 Today's Woman - "Tragedy
Kins Christophe"
4:30 Something Else
5:00 Stratosphere Playhouse
5:30 Local News
6:00 Love and the Law - (advan-
tages of cideotaped testimony),
6:30 NCAA Super Sports
7:00 Community Dialogue - (Rev.
Dan Burke, a specialist in
medical ethics, and David
Blanchard of Project Row
are guests.)
8:00 Monday's Ann Arbor City
Council Meeting

*

tO NI TE

*

El Teatro Cam pesino
to perform here

After moving the equipment
around onstage for twenty mm-
utes, Vinegar Joe came on and
were immediately plagued by equ
were immediately plagued by
equipment problems which
started with a cut in the electric-
ity and continued throughout
their set with several inoperable
microphones. Even with these
problems, singer Elkie Brooks
showed herself to be an experi-
enced performer as. she joked
with the audience and sang a
song backed only by organ. The
band finally got going and did
several of the numbers from
their new album, including the
title song, "Rick 'n' Roll Gyp-
sies," which they said was their
single in this country. All their
music was simple, tastefully
done, and hard-hitting. They
were pressedhfor timenand ended
their shortened set with Jerry
Lee Lewis' "Whole Lotta Shak-
in"' which was one of the best
rock 'n' roll performances I've
seen. Even though they were
really getting into it, theaudi-
ence declined to join in with the
typical call-response gimmick
used in many rock concerts.
The next equipment change
was handled with a minimum of
time, and Wishbone Ash came
out onstage. The band is a four-
piece, bass, drums, and two gui-
tars, and very tight. Their mu-
sic is very much blues-based, but
more recently they have been
doing songs with a wider range
of melodic themes. They played
through most of the songs on
Argus, their most recently re-
leased album, and did two new
songs, one which featured gui-
tarist Ted Turner on Hawaiian
guitar and vocals called "Rock
'n' Roll Widow."
Their set reached its climax
during their extended rendition
of their brilliant instrumental
"Phoenix" which builds slowly
and then really takes off with
some fine guitar. The song fea-
tured Ted Turner on lead and
his work was admirable although
perhaps a bit too long and over-
indulgent. The band then left but
came back a little later to do
two encore numbers, ending with
the long uptemoo blues rocker
"Where Were You Tomorrow"
whichrfeatured Andy Powell on
lead.
The basis of the entire band
lies in the virtuosity of Powell
and Turner on guitar. The band
does use their own variation of
the Allman Brothers' twin lead
concept, but they used it sparing-
ly on Friday, preferring to let

one guitarist take the entire song
while the other played rhythm.
On the blues rocks "Jail Bait"
the two guitarists traded off
riffs and their interplay provid-
ed some nice sounds. The rhy-
thm section of Martin Turner on
bass and Steve Upton is very
tight Upton in particular is a
tasteful drummer while not be-
ing overly flashy. The weakness
of the band is in their vocals
which are obviously understated;
on Friday the vocals were han-
dled mainly by Martin Turner
and in several places he was
joined by Andy Powell in some
unmistakably shoddy harmoniz-
ing. The band doesn't try to -be
flashy, but just plays some real-
ly fine music with the guitar
dominating; there was a slight
tendency to be over-indulgent,
but it wasn't particularly both-
ersome.
air
w A yve s

LED ZEPPELIN
BUDDY MILES

<>~
frN

NEW AT
BIMBO'fS
NO COVER CHARGE
MILO
HIS GUITAR AND
HEAD FULL OF
COUNTRY MUSIC
BIMBO'S
114 E. WASHINGTON
BEER, WINE & COCKTAILS

El Teatro Campesino, an al-
most slap-stick approach to the
struggle of the Chicano, will be
presented on Saturday, April
14th, at Hill Auditorium. El Tea-
tro Campesino - The Farmwork-
ers' Theatre is a Chicano thea-
trical group which grew out of
the 1 9 6 5 Delano, California
Grape Strike. The group uses a
self-developed kind of dramatic
form, the Acto. These 10 to 15
minute skits are performed with
no scenery and only an occa-
sional costume or prop. Instead,
the members hang signs around
their necks, indicating the stock

characters: the patron, the con-
tractor, the scab, etc. Through
the use of improvisations, each
Acto is intended to make one
specific point about Chicano life,
stemming from the members'
own real life incidents.
During its existence, El Teatro
Campesino has travelled exten-
sively and has accumulated sev-
eral acclaimed awards, including
an Obie for its off-Broadway per-
formance in New York. El Tea-
tro's April 14th performance at
Hill will be presented at 8 p.m.
Admission is free.

I

-i1

Buddy Miles from "Band of Gypsies"

STEPHEN STILLS
j ERIC CLAPTON
>, JACK BRUCE
and the
< MODERN JAZZ QUINTET
in
"SUPER SHOW"
Directed by JOHN CRONE
SUPER SHOW has the largest number of superstars performing
together than any other concert. The show has everything from
rock to jazz to blues and is sure to appeal to almost everyone.
Some of the groups and musicians are Led Zeppelin, Buddy
Miles, Stephen Stills, Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Modern Jazz
Quartet. Led Zeppelin performs "Dazed" and "Confused" and
allows you to see some of Jimmy Page's guitar virtuoso. Stephen
Stills joins up with Buddy Miles' group to perform "Black
Queen," one of Stills' compositions probably never heard before.
There is also one of the most far-out jams ever heard with Eric
Clopton, Miles, Bruce and many other "Superstars."
Modern Languages Building-Aud. 3

"OPENS TOMORROW!"
The University Players
proudly present
AI ME CESAI RE'S
S"THE TRAGEDY OF
KING CHRISTOPHE"
(The black ex-slave and cook who
became the King of Haiti)
APRIL 1114
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
(FRIEZE BUILDING)

9jMediatrics
FRIDAY THE 13TH SPECIAL
WI LLARD
7 & 9:30 p.m.
Nat. Sci. Aud.
only 75c lickets on sale at 6 p.m.
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP
Nine men who came too late and stayed too long.

By the WABX Air Aces
Alice Cooper's pet boa con-
strictor, which vanished eight
months ago from Alice's motel
room in Nashville, Tennessee,
was found dead recently in the'
hotel's plumbing; it had been
clogging up pipes in the drain
system since December. Alice
had already replaced the boa
with another. (Hopefully, a
thicker one.)
CBS-TV has cancelled "Wood-
stock", which was scheduled to
air April 19th; it had already
been cut to three hours. A CBS
vice - president said the can-
cellation was because of editing
and production difficulties creat-
ed by a broadcast technician's
strike. However, four months
ago CBS reported that "Wood-
stock" had been fully edited for
TV.
The Allman Brothers are plan-
ning a series of benefit concerts,
the proceeds of, which will be
used to set up a North Ameri-
can Indian fund for the preser-
vation of their culture and way
of life. The group expects to
raise more than two million dol-
lars from the benefits. The main
concert is scheduled for May 6
in Boulder, Colorado. Artists
who've been approached for help
include Joan Baez, Johnny Cash,
Alice Cooper, the Grateful Dead,
Dick Gregory and Leon Russell.
If record prices get you down,
the varience between median
prices and what you pay won't
make you feel any better. $4.98,
$5.98 and $7.98 albums have ap-
proximate distributor prices of
$2.14, $2.52 and $3.43 respective-
ly. And there's a record - indus-
try move to raise album pri-
ces another fifty cents or so.
UPCOMING C O N C E R T S:
Procul Harum's at Ford the
10th; Leon Russell at U. of D.,
April 14; Steve Miller at Ford the
20th; Siegal - Schwall & It's a
Beautiful Day at Masonic 4/21;
and Roy Buchanan at Ford the
same day.

19189
i
r

Local
Poets-
The Michigan
D~aily Arts
Page is now
accepting
poetry for
publication.
Submit work
4-U A.+ Ad +-.ULO

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