100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 10, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r uesday, April 10, 1973

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Russo takes stand at
Pentagon Papers trial

I

By AP and Reuter
LOS ANGELES - Anthony Rus-
so wept on the witness stand at the
Pentagon papers trial yesterday as
he told jurors of the sufferings of
a North Vietnamese villager he
encountered while interviewing
capture prisoners for a research
study.
Russo, calling the prisoner "the
strongest man I ever met," drop-
ped his head and wiped his eyes

as he told the story to jurors.I
Then, laughing through his tears,1
he said, "See even now when Il
talk about it, it comes back toi
me."
The 36-year-old defendant, ont
trial with Daniel Ellsberg, told the1
story to illustrate the experiences
which transformed him from anf
"establishment" researcher ont
government projects to a vehe-
ment antiwar activist.t

Waters rise at New
Orleans; floods field

He admitted to jurors that he
helped Ellsberg copy the Pentagon
papers study of the Vietnam war
in 1969, but said he had never seen
the documents before copying
them, and indicated he did not
know their contents.
Russo said he was shocked to
find during an 18-month research
tour interviewing prisoners, refu-
gees and defectors that half the
bombs dropped over Vietnam were
anti-personnel weapons designed
to kill people.
He said these weapons were
dropped in both South and North
Vietnam and many of them killed
civilians.
Russo said he submitted a re-
port to the Air Force on the ef-
fects of the anti-personnel bombs.
"I was hoping that when they
saw how bad it was for the peo-
ple whotthey got dropped on, they
might stop using them,
"But I think I was kind of na-
ice. They just escalated using
them."
Ellsberg is expected to take the
witness stand when Russo finishes.
I {-

a

AP Photo
Convoy reaches Phnom Perth
Cambodian soldier mans a machine-gun on a river patrol boat escorting a convoy into the besieged
Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh. Four ships carrying badly-needed food, fuel and ammunition ar-
rived Sunday, but two were set ablaze in a Viet Cong ambush and 13 had to turn back to South
Vietnam.
C AN ADIA1N GEtNER A L CHARGES:
Viet Conblaed for
crash o truce copter

SAIGON (A) - A Canadian
peacekeeping investigator charg-
ed yesterday that a cease-fire
commission helicopter which
crashed Sunday over Viet Cong-
held territory in South Vietnam
was shot down by a heat-seek-
ing missile.
Maj. Gen. Duncan McAlpine
sharply disputed a Viet Cong
claim that the helicopter met
with an accident in which nine of
its passengers, including a Ca-
nadian and two American civi-
lian pilots, were killed Saturday.
"An accident?" M c A l p i n e
snapped.."Surely, with everyone
in the area knowing this was an
approved flight, and with verba-
tim reports of the survivors, I
think otherwise."
"The fact is that the helicop-
ter . . . did in fact sustain a
heat-seeker."
The helicopter was on a mis-
sion in South Vietnam's north-
west corner for the Internation-
al Commission of Control and
Supervision (ICCS).
Among the dead were four
commission members, three
crewmenand two Viet Cong liai-
son officers.
A second commission helicop-
ter was hit by "sustained ground
fire" and made a forced land-
ing near the first in what Mc-
Alpine called "desperate circum-
stances." Its 11 passengers and
crew were not hurt.
McAlphine said the pilot of the
second helicopter reported see-
ing a missile. He quoted the air-
man as saying: "I saw it go by
--pow! - then it burst in a
ball of flames."
McAlpine, head of Canada's
military delegation with the in-
ternational commission, w a s
speaking at Saigon's airport on

his return from an investigation
of the incident in Quang Tri
Province.
Reports that the aircraft was
hit by a missile were a "distor-
tion of the truth," the Viet Cong
declared in a statement.
The Communists also denied
that their forces fired yesterday
on a third helicopter which South
Vietnam reported was hit by six
rounds of enemy small-arms fire
while on a peacekeeping mis-
sion over the Mekong Delta.
The Saigon military command
spokesman, Lt. Co. Le Trung
Hien, announced that the chop-
per - flying for a Joint Mili-
tary Commission (JMC) - now
made up of South Vietnam and
the Viet Cong - sustained slight
damage but put down safely at
Vi Thanh, 100 miles southwest
of the capital.
In Washington, a White House
spokesman said President Nixon
views the attacks on clearly
marked ICCS helicopters as "ex-
tremely serious." The State De-
partment said the incident was
a "totally callous flaunting" of
the cease-fire agreement.
In a speech to the Saigonj
Lions Club, Ambassador Michel
Gauvin, chairman of the Cana-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the Universty of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second4
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,r
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
dlay through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year, Subscriptionrates.: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich, or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday' morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

dian delegation, said that Cana-
da had agreed to extend its or-
iginal 60 days of participation in
the truce observer body "with
grave doubts about the useful-
ness of our presence."
He said this was the result of
the "rather dismal record of the
ICCS so far in fulfilling its re-
sponsibilities objectively and im-
partially, as well as our skep-
ticism that the ICCS can or
should in fact perform the sym-
bolic political function that some
would thrust upon it.
"But we are remaining in the
hope that within a relatively
brief period of time the parties
to the conflict will move toward
a political settlement that will
make our presence unneces-
sary."

NEW ORLEANS *(4') - Army
flood control experts said yester-
day one of the century's great
Mississippi River floodstwas still
safely squeezed within the levees
-but they're girding for higher
water.
"I can't tell you now whether
we're peaking out or whether
we're going to get a worse situa-
tion before we're through," said
Maj. Gen. Charles Noble, presi-
dent of the Mississippi River Com-
mission.
Much depends on the runoff from
thawing snows and spring rains in
the river's 1.24 million-square-mile
watershed area, especially along
the Ohio, he said.
"Right now I am preparing my-
self for more water than we now
have predicted," he added. "I will
then be in a position to do some-
thing if this thing changes rapid-
ly - as it has been changing."
le estimated that backwater
from the river's choked tributaries
has temporarily forced some 6,000
families from their homes - main-
lv in sections near St. Louis, Mo.,
and in Mississippi.
Noble ordered the opening of all
350 panels of the Bonnet Carre
Spillway dam Sunday to ease the
pressure on levees protecting New
Orleans.
When the spillway is complete-
ly opened today nearly a sixth of
the river's flow, measured at 1.6
million cubic feet a second at
Vicksburgh, Miss., will be divert-
ed. It will stream through a 5.7-
mile trough of low land into salty
Lake Pontchartrain, which con-
nects to the Gulf of Mexico.
The order opening the dam for

the first time since 1950 came
after the River Forecasting Cen-
ter said the water was going to
20.2 on the New Orleans gauge-
past the danger point, according to
Army engineers.t
Opening the spillway was ex-
pected to drop the level back tot
17.5 at New Orleans by Wednes-
day. But the latest computer read-
outs at the forecasting center pre-
dicted 18.6 here by April 16, even
with the spillway open.
Engineers expect the Bonnet
Carre Spillway opening to offset
further damage, but Noble said
the engineers are prepared to open
the Marganza Spillway, north of
Baton Rouge, if waters continue
to r'se.
Though high river stages could
last two more months, Noble re-
ported headway in the upper Mis-
sissippi River Valley where river
stages are lowering.
He said waters in the Tennessee
and Ohio Valleys are being held
back to ease the situation in the
lower Mississippi Valley.
Present river stages, he said,
have produced "the highest levels
since 1844."
Water from about half the Unit-
ed States drains through New Or-
leans, Noble said, and the area
can expect continued high-river
stages for a month or more.

TODAY AT 1-3-5-7-9
"Barbra Streisand is a com-
plete reason for going to the
movies, as Garbo was."
-Pauline Kel, New Yorker

i T _t

I

TONIGHT--April 10
FRED ASTAIRE and GINGER [:9GERS
in

Follett's
Put-On Shoppe
featuring
Personalized
Imprinting
on
T-shirts, Sweat-shirts,
Jerseys

TOP

HATy

The CLASSIC American musical

Canadian
repeatedly
Hungarian

officials have stated
that the Polish and
delegations have re-

fused to participate seriously in
an investigation of truce viola-
tions except those demanded by
the Communist side.

you can.,
0
plus ALL ABOUT SEX!
Cinema 482-3300
PARKIES

3RD HIT WEEK!
FEATURE PROMPTLY AT
1-3-5:05-7:05-9:10
(No Short Subjects)
IN THE LIFE AND TIMES OF
?A
STACY KEACH BRUNO
(Orna! Bad Bob) (The Watch Bear)

I

WHILE YOU WAIT & WATCH
IT'S FUN AND IT'S AT
FOLLETTFS &

7 and 9

Architecture Auditorium

$1

1r

_ , i

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE

TOMORROW: Due to rental mix-ups beyond our
control, Singin' in the Rain, has been cancelled. An
American in Paris will be shown instead.

t
i
r

Everyone
LOTS OF PEOPLE

Welcome!
GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
LOTS OF FOOD

s

MATINEE SEATS AVAILABLE
I PF1 1IOGRAM

imake
ourselves
credible?.
MISSIONHURST invites you
to do just that by becoming a
modern missionary priest or

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
n ne, an
MissJ's short
jacket and pant set
softens spring in
<< gabardine. ..the look
is now in natural toned
polyester/cotton. , top-
stitched straight leg
pants and jacket
accented with epaulets,
pockets, cherry red
buttons and a wide waist
buckled to a trim fit.
Super as a pair or
playing it alone, in
sizes 5-13. The set, $56.
4, AAW
f

"GREAT, UNEQUIVOCABLY GREAT"-cuvE BARNES,N.Y. TIMES
"A HILARIOUS ROMP"-TIME MAGAZINE
"TOTAL ENTERTAINMENT...HILARIOUS...
GUARANTEED TO CONVULSE YOU"-NEWSDAY

brother
tice in
world!

to bring truth and jus-

Jesus' name to

the

kuAPIPR AII( D'V~EARIF

15510

HURST

Please send me information on becoming

i e massinnerv tnripst a rrtissienarv hrother

I

E

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan