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April 08, 1973 - Image 14

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Michigan Daily, 1973-04-08
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I

Page Four
WHY BUY
AT TWICE
THE PRICE?
WE BUY, SELL
AND TRADE
O WOODEN
SPOONy
USED
BOOKS
. Open Noon v
Wed.-Sun.
200 n. 4th ove.
769-4775 ,.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MAGAZINE

1 "

Sunday, April 8, 1973

Sunday, April 8, 1973

, -

(Continued from Page 3) same time, marriage can also Will it be any different for them It would be an exercise in futility
the grad school routine, of neces- serve as an isolating factor and somewhere else, at another univer- to try and draw a line between
sity, demands a certain degree of loneliness for two rather than one sity? pseudo-imtellectualism and Intel-
introversion. person. "I think so. There is some set of lectualism. The perceptions -that
Sam went older Tom and Nancy, a married grad circumstances unique to Ann Ar- operate on do not travel in straight
you get the more you become couple, called and said, "We are bor that make it the way it is. It's lines. Moreover, this problem is not
aware of yourself, Who you are. happy with our marriage, but we hard to describe, it's just hard to one which is peculiar to the cam-
Ywareyof yourselfw a e.awould like to meet some new peo- meet people here." pus area, for people in the com-
You rely upon..yourself, and in a muniytrelteptothehUiversty i
sense, sooth yourself with an in- said, '"Most of the people I workdmu;ty relate to the University in
ner-communication. You are your ple. We are tired of spending so RAD STUDENTS do not monop- much the same way. A middle-
own frame of reference and it be- much time alone together." olize loneliness in Ann Arbor aged native of Ann Arbor and ex-
comes increasingly harder to ex- It is interesting to note another, as many of them would have you student at the University comment-
ternalize yourself to others. To call from a single male grad who b e 1 i e v e. Aphone-call-collage of ede No aruni vaffilated wth t
communicate. Every year Ii live with in my department are mar-4 Ann Arbor is like leaving the shut-thswoarafiaed ihte
in Ann Arbor my head gets three ried. When your friends get mar-, ter of a camera open for a time ;University. 'We are caught in a
maybe four years older." ried it's hard to be as close to lapse exposure. "There are eight void because of the awesome con-
Many grad students get married them as you were." million stories in the naked city." vencration of superior people. It
in order to maintain their sanity, Many single grad students com- THIS CANVAS - IS NOW OPEN j makes me self conscious. The so-
to have someone whom they can plained about the lack of oppor- FOR THE "EGO - ROCK." Shuf- cial scene in the community of_
communicate with and depend up- tunity to meet each other. At the fle on by. What do you see, what professionals, professor's wives
on. This is one answer, but at the same time, they spoke of their in- do you leave? What is figure, what who 'entertain at home' in their
abilityto dealawith many under- is ground? Ann Arbor, a city and deliberately subtle hairdos (this
vme.itscrcmtacs woman is a beautician), the
graduate men and cliques thesbigroneyswhchcforce
Sam explained, "I've tried to Many callers spoke of Ann Ar- ca ig cost of ingoney which forces
deal with undergraduate women. bor's pseudo-intellectualism as a the conservative atmosphere, the
There's a generation gap; I can't, factor which limits communica-s
deal-with the pseudo - intellectualism, all serve
eryonedeal with theidentity crises they tion and isolates people. It causes to make the people of average
are going through. I'm long past a fear of opening your mouth and ability, the townspeople, mistrust
that. It's hard to communicate in talking to the person next to you, I.t nivet."n
any depth, even though all the whether it be in class, on the the Uimversityi
sexual attraction is there . . . the street, or even in the community. This woman went on to explain
PUZ LES Igrad women I know can't deal too "They may be more intelligent, that most of her friends, the peo-
easily with undergrad men either." and think you a mere simpleton." plc with whom she had grown up,
have left Ann Arbor. She explain-
TEACUIN AIDS 'ed the exodus in that the cost of
* tACHINb AIDS "There is some set of circumstances unique living was too high pointing to
Ann t their failure to find a niche within
to rbrh ma e tne it the University. She lives alone with
hard to describe, it's just hard to meet her mother and stays here because
hardshe is tied to the University Hos-
peop e here.''pital for health reasons.
Admittedly she seemed to be ob-
CIENC DEPTsessed with loneliness. However,
SCIENCE DEPT. This problem can be raised to This phenomenon is very conducivese dithnelines. Howe
r__L . ____ __-.,she did pose an interesting incite

Memoirs of a McGovern
Worker.
The party on the White House Lawn
by Daniel Biddle

Something f
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the nth degree for the foreign grad to stimulating discussions in class-°.
student. Juan a Venezuelan grad es where in the silence one can to loneliness in Ann Arbor
student in engineering, explained, hear mental sharpshooters loading'. "Many people think Ann Arbor
1 "There are very few of my people ammunition. It is very helpful also s cosmopolitan. The small-big city
on campus. When I meet a girl, I to have this in mind when con- with something for everyone. It's
don't have a language barrier to templating an attempt to meet new a myth. In a big city you can find
overcome, but I find I -have a great people. a place for yourself. Its hard to
cultural one. When I graduate I How does this pseudo-intellect= do that here.
plan to return home to my coun- ualism fit into the total picture ofMEANWHILE
try. It is very unlikely that I could Ann Arbor? BACK on campus
ask an American woman to come Sheri, a junior, commented, "It' . . . The peculiar degree of
with me and adapt to my culture." becomes a defense mechanism for transcience takes its toll nm lonely
In this struggle between emo- most people. You need it to stay Abo to get somet ing.mey stay
tional and intellectual balance alive in the academic and social until they do and then leave.
some grad students lose. Or maybe competition on this campus. We've Because of their living situa-
they win. They leave Ann Arbor got a campus full of 'gifted peo- tion while they are here, many
and continue their education else- ple' many of whom have the in- oIchslend mostaof ther tme
where Why? flated egos to prove it. It becomes a popMorepemlli eif-cm
A female grad had this to say, necessary for them to define them- aos ore poei in moffcm-r
"Three of my friends have left selves in terms of who they have pus housing than in most major
Ann Arbor. Not because they were done better than, or how much euniversities in the country. People
unhappy with their grad programs, smarter they are than the person are living i is.late glc ricas
but because they had no other who is sitting next to them in lec- over campusthsingle rooms,
lives outside of their studies." ture." atd asments. houses g tr-e
and basements. Because most stu-
dents move every year, many are
forced to live with people who
walk out of newspaper ads. There
is the constant roommate hassle
where some people who are just
incompatible must live together
in order to come up with enough
money to pay rent every month.
This situation is not at all un-
common. Often times, those people
'who have a hard time meeting and
communicating with people on
campus, also find themselves un-
able to speak to those- people with
whom they are living. This could
be trueefor arvariety of reasons.
Rick, a grad-student in the Busi-
ness Administration School, tells
Continued on Page 8)

The trouble with the McGovern
campaign is that you've got too
many fuzzies, Dan. Too many
lighter-than air, "true believer"
idealists and not enough M a y o r
Daleys.
-Allen Baldwin
Bowling Green, Ohio
October, 1972
What kind of shape is this cam-
paign in? It's in terrible shape.
Yes, there's still a chance . . . you
have to understand something.
You have to understand that
George McGovern is an incredibly
compassionate man. He's too hon-
est. A committee of 12 other peo-
ple should filter everything he says
before it goes out to the public,
because he speaks straight from
the heart.
-ABC Reporter Bill Matney
Chicago, Illinois
August, 1972
WOOD COUNTY, OHIO, L ATE
OCTOBER - An hour before sun-
set, within sight of Toledo - a
horizon of smokestacks - we ride
down the flatlands on Interstate
75 in a blue Pinto rented to Mc-
Govern-Shriver '72/Ohio.
".. the next time we call Cleve-
land, we got to tell Barb to sneak
us $500 for the farm mailing, au-
thorized or not . . . you know.
Heath is convinced that George is
gonna make a farm appearance
for nationwide broadcast in Find-
ley next Sunday, but everyone else
says it's not definite at all."
"Heath Reichmann is 95 per
cent talk."
"Hey, Obie, is it true that Frye
sleeps with his mother?"
"Lives with 'her. I don't know
about sleep."
"Are all farmers crazy? They
are, aren't they?"
"Naa. Just stupider than hell."
"Christ, look at this, I've never
seen so many trucks in all my -_
hey, do you think we should do the
mailing to Van Wert County? You
know, there's gotta be some Demo-
cratic votes down there."
"Hhhhhaaa . . . not at this late
date. Anybody gonna vote for Mc-
Govern down there, gonna vote for
him no matter what the hell we
do."
"Hey."
"Yeah?"
"What are those?"
"What?"
"In that truck."
"Those? THOSE?"
"Yeah, those."
"Ha! Those are sugarbeets!
Hahahahahah! Fuck, man. You
don't even know what the hell
a SUGARBEET looks like. Ha-
hahahaha."
"Fuckin' eh, man. I'm a city
boy."
"That's no lie."
... I'm thinking about shav-
ing off my mustache."
"No, don't do that, Dan. Any-
thing that makes you look like
you're older than 19, that's good
for us."
"Yeah, I suppose so . .. you
know, if we both keep shaving
with that same razor, we'll look
like we've been through a war."

"We have. Just keep shaving
and don't forget what state
you're in."
"But after Election Day, I'm
letting my hair grow back. I
don't want to look like Steve
Straight when we have our
party on the White House lawn."
"I wouldn't stay up all night
worrying about that if I were
you."
FOR WEEKS AND WEEKS we
lived with this crazy notion
that someday we, all the thousands
of us from all over the country,
and George, would have a party
out there on the White H o u s e
lawn, and we would invite every-
body.
Aware that such a party could
only occur under one condition, I
spent most of the three months
before Election Day, 1972, working
for George McGovern's presiden-
tial campaign in the Northwest
section of Ohio, where there are a
number of factories, a handful
of towns, and many, many farm-
houses.
For the last seven weeks I was
the state campaign's Fifth Con-
gressional District coordinator.
Owen Bair, "Obie," the man who
told me not to have my mustache
off, was my assistant and loyal
sidekick.
Brothers in the cause, our lives
rose and fell for that magnified
space of time on canvassing re-
sults, contributions, volunteers'
numbers and enthusiasm, local re-
action to oir efforts, and nation-
wide opinion surveys.
We worked out of a small and
uncomfortable office in Bowling
Green, the district's approximate
geographical center and the only
place for miles that resembled a
college town.
The small and uncomfortable
office had previously belonged to
The American Cancer Society's
local chapter. Once a man came in
waving a check for $20, and just
We gathered around us
e( couple of organizers . . .
ndm leaped togethler into
tie eggheater of the
JMc overn campaign
as we were preparing the red car-
pet treatment (five different and
colorful McGovern buttons, t w o
elegant posters, and all the leaf-
lets you can eat) he declared that
he was in the wrong place a n d
could we please direct him to the
Cancer society.
The "McGovern coalition" f o r
Ohio's Fifth District could n o t
have been quite like anything that
part of the world had ever seen
before.
For some of us, like me, had
conversely never seen that part of
the world before. Strangers to the
planet Ohio, John Kenneth Gal-
braith's son Jamie and I came to
Bowling Green in August armed
with haircuts, instructions, p r e-
conceptions about "the sticks", and
spirit.
And ignorance.

4' 1
f f-
s '.
~Rabb, hots high is the price of

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f' ''

NEW AT
BIMBO'S
NO COVER CHARGE

v
-- _

It took us weeks to understand
that the rush of sugar-sweet a i r
when you drove down from Toledo
was not anti-pollutant or a i r
freshener but cornsilk. In Ohio,
the harvest provides the perfume.
On the other, more calloused
hand, we were assisted by a certain
rotund man.. .
"Can all of Ohio be this flat,
Al?"
"No . . . this is one of the flatter
reaches. The highest point in
Wood County is that overpass
coming up on our right," said the
rotund man one day as he drove
us up to meet the Democratic
county chairman one day in late
August.
"Ha! Are you serious? That's hi-
larious!" Jamie, the buoyant 22-
year old optimist and self-styled
pro, and I, the nervous but excit-
ed 19-year old rookie, began to
laugh.
The rotund man, a long-time re-
sident of Wood County. cringed
with mock pride.
"Jamie," he intoned most ser-
iously, "that remark was not hu-
morous in intent.'
We continued to laugh. This cOd
not greatly please the rotund man,
who knitted his Polish eyebrows
furiously and harrunlphed at our
impertinence.
But Allen Baldwin was not real-
ly angry at us. 26 years old, al-
ready something of a veteran poli-
tical ace with a growing boss-like
presence among the arena's Demo-
cratic biggies, big Al was our best
ally.
WE CALLED HIM King Farouk.
Al was liberal, almost radical

in his
practi(
seousl3
ance.
Itw
of the
him.
We
of org:
dred
gether
McGo,
It w
emergi
Democ
faces.
vassalt
wives,
retiree
dents
presen
lived t
for tw
The
ered a
gressn
well-ft
Delber
re-elec
of the
Befo
party
dentia
Fifth.
Our
thing i
tory t(
the Ma
Pauldi:
(popul
farm o
We
calls a:
but th
lawn p

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&
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at 8:30
AND

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ONE WEEK
Buster Keaton
MASQUERADOR
Charlie Chaplin
MANY MORE

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II

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