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February 06, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A4

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 6, 1973 1

BRITISH PLAN STUDY
Lynch calls for surprise
By AP and Reuters forthcoming talks with the British.| desirable at a time when Ireland!
DUBLIN - Prime Minister Jack A British government policy is starting to experience the pangs
Lynch yesterday ordered a sur- document on the future of North- of entry into the European Com-
price national election for Feb. 28, ern Ireland is due out in March. mon Market.
apparently to strengthen his gov- The British have promised to con- A public vote of confidence
ernment's hand for the bargain- sult Lynch in advance on these would help Lynch's efforts toI
ing with Britain on the future of proposals and the Irish leader ap- crack down on terrorism and keep
Northern Ireland. 1 peared to have this in mind when I the violence in Northern Ireland
Lynch could have waited out the 1 he called the snap election. from spreading across the border.
remaining 16 monthe of his current Lynch said he was now asking The election, Lynch declared, is
term of office before going to the the electorate to provide him with "essential if a protracted per-
voters. But he is riding a wave of a "clear and decisive mandate." iod of political uncertainty and
popularity and clearly hopes a re- Several factors combine to make instability is to be avoided."
inforced mandate will help in his ; such a firm grip on government His government majority in the
Dail (the lower house of Parlia-
ment) has been gradually eroded
New twist e eO s since his party, the Fianna Fail,
His party holds only 70 of the
144 seats in the Dail and relies on
iS 8 dhalf a dozen independents to give
in Eberg defnse him the balance of power over the
main opposition party, Fine Gael,
with 51 seats.
LOS ANGELES (P) - The judge gon papers volumes evaluated by Lynch's action came as North-
in the Pentagon papers trial refus- a government analyst as having ern Ireland was ravaged by a
ed yesterday to let the defense tell no relation -to national security. bloody surge of sectarian fighting
jurors about the government's al- Elimination of those volumes that has claimed at least 20 lives,
leged "suppression of evidence, 'would, in efect, eliminate t h r e e:with nearly 50 persons wounded, in
but said he would consider allow- counts of the 15-count indictment the last week.
ing additional defense remarks lat- against Ellsberg and Russo. The The savagery of this feuding be-
er. judge took the motion under .ub- tween rival Protestant and Roman
U.S. District Court Judge M a t t mission for a later ruling.
Byrne said that at the end of the The government has been seek- The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
The grnovetrn et ha s~bense k-aged by students at the University of
eoverments cae. hewoul re-Ing to- show, that-thee Aefenaa..s en-

election
Catholic extremists spurred fears
in Belfast that the violence would
escalate. In Dublin it was felt
that the bloodletting would spill ov-
er the border on a wider scale
than ever before.
Lynch has won general support
for his policies, including a crack-
down on the outlawed Irish Repub-
lican Army and a major revamp-
ing of Ireland's constitution.
Lynch declared his government
has "pursued the only sane policy
which could bring about a true
reconciliation of the communities
and a lasting peace with justice
for all."
Domestic economic issues may
be even more important. The
price of butter, milk, meat and
eggs have been rising sharply in
recent months. Discontent about
this has been matched by worries
over climbing unemployment in
the textile and shoe-making trades.
Some of Lynch's opponents sug-
gest that he may be anxious to
squeeze in an election before pro-
posed new electoral reforms which
would re-draw constituency boun-
daries in a way unhelpful to Fian-
na Fail.

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS
2 JAZZ GREATS
IN ONE CONCERT
herbie
hancock
and special guest star
freddie
hubbard
SAT., FEB. 24
8 P.M.--LAIUD.
4.50-4-3.50-2.50
reserved seats on sale
MICH. UNION
11 -5:30 Mon.-Sat.
and Salvation Records

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Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
Reefer madness hits dorm
Alice Lloyd residents held their first publicized Bong Festival
Sunday night. Three judges determined the winner on the basis of
style, how long the contestant could hold his toke and the amount
of smoke exhaled.
INJUNCTION GRANTED:

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gvvciiiuaat vac ic wu ue i ng to show that the defendants en-
consider attorney Leonard Boudin's dangered national security b; re-
motion to reopen his opening state- n ee
hna r4p.tS

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FAAdelays ruling
for airline guards
WASHINGTON (A')-Under a temporary restraining order, the
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) yesterday delayed a regulation
which would have gone into effect at midnight requiring airports to
provide guards at each passenger boarding gate.
The FAA said, however, the new rule would still go into effect
immediately at the two airports it operates, Washington National and
Dulles International near the capital.
The agency urged other airports to provide such officers also, if
possible.
The FAA had ordered that all airports comply with the new rule as
of Feb. 6.
The new FAA regulations require each airport to station at least
one law enforcement officer at each passenger boarding gate.
The airport group petitioned Jan. 26 for a six-month postponement,
claiming many airports could not hire and train the required officers
immediately.
The FAA denied the Airport Operators' Council International (AOCI)
petition for a six-month postponement in the deadline yesterday
morning.
The airport operators thereupon went to court and won a temporary
injunction. It prohibited the FAA from putting the new rule into effect
before Feb. 16, and ordered a Feb. 13 hearing to resolve the legal
questions that had been raised.
Some airports already have hired the additional officers required
to man boarding gates where passengers are screened for hidden;
weapons and their hand luggage is inspected.
AOCI complained that the FAA was trying to coerce 531 local
governments to take over the federal government's obligations to the
public at airline airports.

meat to jurors.
The seemingly unprecedented
procedure of a defense openingj
statement in the midst of the gov-
ernment's case was first raised by
Byrne on Friday as a possibleI
"sanction" against the government
for withholding until now docu-
ments which could help prove
Daniel Ellsberg and Anthony Rus-
so innocent.
Ellsberg and Russo are charged
with espionage, conspira,y a n d
theft in connection with the leak
to news media in 1971 of the top
secret Pentagon history of the
Vietnam war.
Hearings outside the jury'-, pre-
sence in the past two weeks have
revealed that some of the govern-
ment's own analysts concluded in
1971 that the papers were worth-
less to an enemy when released.
The judge denied defense mo-
tions for dismissal and mistrial on
Friday but said he would consider
future "sanctions" against the gov-
ernment for withholding the docu-
ments.
In that connection, Boudin also
moved yesterday for the judge to
forbid the prosecutor to introduce
evidence from two of the Penta-

Byrne ordered testimony before
the jury to resume for the first
time since Jan. 26 with defense
cross-examination of Brig. G e n .
Paul Gorman; an intelligence ex-
pert who said earlier that release
of the Pentagon history would have
helped enemy countries.

Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area) ; $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

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(( MICHIMERS present
Woody Allen's play
Play It Again, Sam
8 P.M.-THURS.-FRI.
FEB. 8-10
MENDELSOHN THEATRE
TICKETS $2 & $2.50 in the
Fishbowl and at Mendelssohn Box Office

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"SWIRLS WITH
ACTI ON"
-Sat. Review
"TENSE, GRIPPING!

"FUN"

-Cue
-Time

"RAQUEL WELCH
HAS GOTTEN IT ALL
TOGETHER!"_L.A. Times
"A SWEATY,
GOODTIME
MOVIE!"-Stork,
Det. Free Press
SAS,
BOMBER

..

UAC-DAYSTAR presents
John
denver
sat. feb. 17
hill aud. 8 p.m.
$4.50-4.00-3.50-2.50
reserved seats
MICHIGAN UNION
11-5:30 Mon.-Sat.
SORRY NO PERSONAL CHECKS

starts thursday - LAST 2 DAYS -
"THE YALACHI PAPERS" Tues., Wed.: "Sobr"-6 :30
rH ru "Bomber"-10:00
..?o0rg.

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NEW MORNING presents
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Starring Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda, Sylvia Miles, Julie
Adams, Samuel Fuller and featuring

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Research statistics show that more than half of all
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Get to know how the two of you don't have to
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Or the four of you. Or...

FEBRUARY 7
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7:30 & 9:30

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"a frenzied, brilliant, love-hate attack on contemporary movies, including his own,
and our assumptions about them.
The story is about what happens after director Samuel Fuller finishes shooting his

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