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April 06, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
WOUNDED KNEE TRIAL

Saturday, April 6, 1974

AIM, news media clash

NEW YORK (P) - Dennis
Banks, leader of the American
Indian Movement (AIM) and a
defendant in the Wounded Knee
occupation trial, has accused the
major news media of suppressing
coverage of the trial, now under
way in St. Paul, Minn.
Banks specifically named The
Associated Press (AP) and Unit-
ed Press International (UPI) in
his accusations, charging that
the two wire services had been
Be careful with fire:
There are babes
in the woods.

pressured by the government to
play down coverage of the trial.
He said that coverage of the
trial, which began Jan. 8, 1974,
had been restricted to the Min-
neapolis - St. Paul area, even
though both AP and UPI had
supposedly sent out "reams of
stories" from there concerning
the trial.
Banks said that an executive
decision "apparently was made
. . ." by both wire services who
"have buckled to pressure put
on by the FBI" to "suppress the
truth coming out during the
trial."
Banks said that the wire serv-
ices' decision apparently had
been made in their New York
City headquarters, but he admit-
ted that AIM had not been to
either AP or UPI to back up the
charges.
Banks said thrat there appeared
to be a government conspiracy
involving the Bureau of Indian

Affairs, the FBI, the U. S. at-
torney's office for the region and
the National Tribal Chairman's
Association to suppress news of
the trial and prevent further
Indian activism.
"The AP St. Paul bureau has
filed story after story," Banks
said, "but nothing comes out of
New York."
Banks made the comments at a
news conference Thursday.
An AP spokesperson said that
there had been no requests or
pressure of any kind from any
government agency. The spokes-
person said that stories had
been carried on the main na-
tional wire and a secondary
wire at various points since the
trial's start.
Banks said that representa-
tives of AIM had traveled to 90
cities around the country in re-
cent weeks to publicize their
story.

Daly Phoo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
DR. CHARLES BOURBONNIERE (left) of the UN Secretariat and Dr. Ersihelle Chalenor (right)
confer before their discussion yesterday on the West African drought. Between them is a representa-
tive for the African Students Association. They spoke to a small crowd yesterday in Angell hall.

Local Nixon lovers
hold petition drive

'TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE'

Au EWubdIkI ~pd

.

_ . .r.,

Yearbook Mass Meeting

-7
I
)

Those people interested in working o

nthe 1975

(Continued from Page 1)
"Bravo. A little publicity is good
to get."
JOHNSON STAPLED two bump-
er stickers to the front and back
of his jacket which proclaimed, '.I
support Nixon." "I put them on
my front door, too," he admitted,
"and I'm liable to put one on my
forehead."
Johnson, who met Nixon per-
sonally, said, "He's not God, but
he's a real fine man."
UrU CINEMA
BI LLY JACK
Wed., Apr. 10-
Woody Allen's
"SLEEPER"
ll Yi W llNtmit iut N1wM1tlrnl11
artli CINEMA
James Bond
"Thunderball" and
"You Only
LiveTwice"
WED.-"Jesus
Christ Superstar"
t r r a 1

One young man, who didn't sign
the petition requested a sticker,
explaining, "I got an impeachment
sticker for my father's car, but
my mother would want one of
those."
ROBERT HANSON, a barber at
Briarwood, scrawled his signature
boldly across six lines, explaining,
"He's just been one hell of a good
president. W a t e rg a t e doesn't
bother me one bit."
Turning suspiciously to the Daily
reporter he asked, "Are you a
Wop?"
When the self-proclaimed East-
erner pushing for Nixon's impeach-
ment r e p li e d, "No," Hanson
charged, "You must be totally rad-
ical. What's your nationality any-
way?"
JOHN GOTTLIEB, '76, stalked
into the drive's headquarters pre-
pared to antagonize the organizers
with his anti-Nixon insults.
After a few friendly rebuttals
from Lloyd Johnson he left, shak-
ing his head in confusion. 'After
talking to them, I decided they're
very sincere people. I wish I could
re-educate them, but I can't."
Vanessa Cushieri, the city chair-
woman of the "Support the Presi-
dent" committee tallied the final
157 signatures, promising, "We'll
get more tomorrow."

African
By MIKE PENNANEN
"Too little, too late."
That terse phrase best describes
American response to the West
African drought, Dr. Ersihelle
Challenor, told a small but atten-
tive crowd yesterday.
THE STUDENTS gathered in'
.Angell Hall to hear Rep.. Charles
Diggs speak on the natural disas-
ter in Africa's Sahel region. Diggs
cancelled his intended appoint-
ment due to a scheduling conflict,
so they were greeted instead by
Challenor, assistant to Diggs in his
role as chairman of the House sub-:
committee on Africa, and Dr.
Charles Bourbonniere of the UN
Secretariat. Bourbonniere is chief
of the UN's special Sahelian office.
Challenor emphasized the "too
little, too late" theme as she de-
cried the U. S. government's slow
reaction to the Sahelian emergen-
qy.
Explaining that one per cent of
the gross national product is the
international standard for aid from
well-off nations to underdeveloped
ones, she pointed that the U.S. con-
tributed ".35 of one per cent" of its
GNP.
This prompted Challenor to ask,
"Why mustbthe richest nation in
I the world be the most parsimon-
iotts?"
She further suggested. that mo-
tivations- both political and mili-
tary were eating away the poten-
tial aid to the drought area.
"While starving Africans needed
food, American ships full of grain
were steaming for Russia . . . and
when the American government

did provide a food air-lift, the de-
fense department highly over- .
charged for the aircraft. Part of
our foreign aid goes to the mili-
tary," she said.
AND ALTHOUGH the first offic-
ial announcement of the emer-
gency came in September, 1972,
U. S. governmental response didn't
appear until May of the following
year.
A bill is now before both houses
of Congress requesting appropria-
tion of $150 million to the relief ef-
fort.
Cha pin flrni

plight decried

Dr. Bourbonniere commented on
the physical phenomena of the sit-
uation.
This, the first such drought in
decades, "worries the scientitsts.
Never have we seen one endure so
long," Bourbonniere said. The fa-
mine is beginning its sixth year.
A major problem is the advance
of the Sahara desert, Bourbonniere
said. "Two years ago I saw an
area that was completely forest.
Now it's just sand."
The African Student Association
requested student help for its buc-
ket drive today.
4d guilty of

1st floor Student Publications Building

EDITORIAL STAFF, PHOTOGRAPHY, ARTWORK, LAYOUT
DESIGN, BUSINESS STAFF (numerous staff positions open

Ii

lying before grand jury
(Continued from Page 1) said he never discussed distribu-
scientific or mathematical certain- tion of campaign literature with
ty, but rather a conclusion on Donald Segretti, an acknowledged
moral certainty." political saboteur hired by Chapin.
But the jury found that Chapin
THE JURY OF seven men and had not lied on the second part of
five women found Chapin inno- the count where he was charged
cent of one count. A fourth count with falsely denying that he knew
was dismissed by Gesell during Segretti had distributed state-
the five-day trial. ments.
Each count carries a maximum Despite the split on the question
penalty of five years in prison and Chapin stands convicted on that
a $10,000 fine. Chapin was invited count.
by the judge to submit "all the
information about yourself" be- THE JURY ALSO determined
fore sentencing. that Chapin lied when he said that
The jury was asked by the judgei had never iv srucgsreitti any
how it voted on the first count in spect to any single or particular
which Chapin was charged with c,,tii
making two false statements to candidate.
the grand jury last April 11. It found him innocent of a
chargd that he lied when ,he told
FOREMAN WESLEY, a retired Segretti to talk to the FBI at a
postal worker, said the jury con- time when it appeared Segretti
victed Chapin of lying when he would be questioned by agents;

,nwarz ; I

......

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