100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ruyu IuII~

_- -

ruga .1 1 it r

MITCHELL-STANS TRIAL

Nixon's brother
By AP and Reter something like cash - if you can
NEW YORK - President Nixon's do it by cash, do it by cash."
youngest brother, Edward, testi- The government claimed it was
fied yesterday at the Mitchell- goemed case it as
Stans trial that it was he who put Stans who specified cash only as
a cash-only label on financier Ro- a means of keeping the contribu-
Bert Vesco's secret $200,000 con-hon a secret. But the 43-year-old
tribution to the 1972 presidential re- Edward said the desire for secrecy
election campaign. originated with Vespo.
The witness quoted former Com-
merce Secretary Maurice Stans as STANS IS ON trial with former
telling him that "the contribution Atty. Gen. John Mitchell on char-
should be in cash to remain abso- ges they conspired to impede a
lutely anonymous, but as far as Securities and Exchange Commis-
the committee was concerned it sion fraud investigation of Vesco's
didn't make any difference." international financial empire in
Edward said he then called return for the $200,000 contribu-
Vesco and "I must have said tion.
March jobless rate
Idecreases sliszhtly

testifies
Vesco, who now resides in Costa
Rica, has successfully rebuffed at-
tempts to get him extradited to
the U. S.

i
I
I
i

Edv
the
after
Judge
lack
16-cou
spira
perju
Stans
Jul
give
the
defen
ficien
He
ing a
deter
tempt
invest
tan, t
The

ward was the first witness for
defense. He took the stand
United States District Court
e Lee Gagliardi dismissed, for
of evidence, one count of the
unt indictment charging con-
zy, obstruction of justice and
ry against Mitchell and
DGE GAGLIARDI did not
an explanation of his granting
dismissal, requested by the
se on grounds of lack of suf-
t evidence.
still must consider dismiss-
second obstruction charge to
mine whether alleged at-
ts to interfere with the SEC
tigation occurred in Manhat-
the court's jurisdiction.
charge dismissed claimed
the defendants had tried to
or prevent five people from
.ying before an SEC investiga-
E DISMISSED COUNT was
of three in the indictments
ging obstruction of justice.
count encompassed a specific
period during which the gov-
ent claimed the conspiracy
active.

to jury
The effect of throwing out the
one count was minimal. The other
two counts cover most of the al-
leged sequence of events. However
it reduces the maximum possible
sentence upon conviction from 50
Iyearsdto 45 years for e a c h
defendant.
Edward was the second of the
President's two brothers to testi-
fy at the trial, now ending its sev-
enth week.
DONALD NIXON, 59, -testified
for the government earlier in the
week that he rebuffed an effort by
a Vesco aide to get a message to
the President.
While Donald bore virtually no
resemblance to his older brother,
the President, Edward looked
somewhat like a younger, taller,
more slender counterpart of the
chief executive.
Edward took the stand wearing
a dark suit, white shirt and red
and gray tie. He testified in a
calm even voice.
THE WITNESS described him-
self as an environmental scientist
and said he served on the board
of directors, or as a consultant,
to various companies which he did
not name.
Edward said that he had known
Vesco since 1966, when he had
helped the financier in making a
$25,000 campaign contribution.

AP Photo
"LET THE MAN take his pictures," W. "Tony" Boyle says to his of ficial escorts on return to the hospital from Thursday's session of his
murder trial in Media, Pa. Boyle, being tried in the deaths of Jose ph Yablonski and members of his family, smiled, gestured and asked
his escort to "walk a little slower" for the photographer. I

WASHINGTON (A') - The small
drop in March unemployment
strengthens President Nixon's
claim that the economy will escape
recession this year, but the job-
less rate is almost sure to rise
again.
THE LABOR DEPART-
MENT report released yesterday
showed that the national jobless
picture has actually improved
since early January despite the
Arab oil embargo, job layoffs in
several key industries, and a de-
clining Gross National Product.
But many economists agreed that
the economy still isn't out of the
woods yet and, although the pros-
pect of a recession seems less cer-
tain, one could still take place.
The report, showing that the
unemployment rate fell from 5.2 to
5.1 per cent, appeared to con-
firm the administration's view that
the economic impact of the energy
crisis isn't spreading across the
entire economy. At least not yet.
So, far, t h e administration
claims, the automobile, tourist and
recreation and housing industries
have taken the main shellacking
while other areas of the economy'
appear strong.
"IF ANYBODY HAD thought
there would be a steep decline,

with unemployment of 6.5 per cent that1
to 7 per cent, that just doesn't stall
seem to be in the picture," said testif3
Herbert Stein, chairman of Presi- tion.
dent Nixon's Council of Economic
Advisers. THl
But Stein was cautious when onec
asked if the March jobs report was charg
enough to prove the President wasE
right when he said in his State of Each
the Union message that there will time
be no recession in the United ernm
States this year. wasa
ti.It certainly is in this direc-
toit is another sign," Stein
said. But he added the administra-
tion believes the jobless rate pro-
bably will go up again and, in that
sense, "it is not a turning point."
ADMINISTRATION
economists said the jobless rate's
climb from 4.8 to 5.2 per cent in
January was higher than expected,
and perhaps overstated.
The report also added support to
the argument of Arthur Burns,
chairman of the Federal Reserve
Board, that Congress should stray
away from cutting taxes to stimu-
late the economy and should re-
cognize inflation as the nation's
number one problem.
1-

Past union, official says Boyle
urged him* to lie about murders

C.J al/

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 149
Saturday, April 6, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. T ews phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May.
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area) ;$11 local mai (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other statee
and foreign).
Summer session pubiishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area)- $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio; a $700 non-foal mail ,other
states and foreign).

JO ANN ALBER/JULIA ANDREWS/MARGARET
BAUM/NANCY BERG/BARBARA CERVENKA/
MIGNONETTE CHENG/SUSAN CROWELL/RITA
MESSENGER-DIBERT/EDWINA DROBNY/CAROL
FURTADO/GEMMA GATTI/ADRIENNE KAPLAN/
CHARLA KHANA/LEE KURTIN/FRAN LATTANZIO/
JOAN MATHEWS/DALEENE MENNING/ MARY
ELLEN PORTER/JACKIE RICE/SUE STEPHENSON/
DOROTHY SMITH/SUE THOMPSON/
ELLEN WILT/GEORGETTE ZIRBES/
WOMANSPACE
APRIL 2-27 OPENS: APRIL 7,4-6 P.M.
UNION GALLERY 0 MICHIGAN UNION 0 ANN ARBOR

MEDIA, Pa. -) - A former
United Mine Worker (UMW) offic-
ial convicted of murder in the Ya-
blonski slayings testified yester-
day that W. "Tony" Boyle visited
him in jail and told him to stick
with his story about having had
nothing to do with the deaths.
WILLIAM PRATER, 53, a for-
mer field representative for UMW
District 19 from LaFollette, Tenn.,
said the former UMW president
visited him in the Erie County,
Pa., jail during Prater's murder
trial last year in the dtath of Jo-
seph "Jock" Yablonski.
Boyle, 72, a former UMW presi-
dent, is on trial in Delaware Coun-
ty Court for the Dec. 31, 1969,

murders of union rival Yablonski,
his wife and daughter in their
Clarksville, Pa., home.
The prosecution contends that
Boyle ordered the killings and ar-
ranged to divert $20,000 in union
funds to pay the assassins.
UNDER QUESTIONING by spe-
cial prosecutor Richard Sprague,
Prater admitted he had lied at his
trial in denying participation in the
murders.
Prater later confessed his in-
volvement and testified at the trial
of Albert Pass - who, PraterI
claims, enlisted him in the plot.'
Pass, of Middlesboro, Ky., former
secretary - treasurer of District 19,
was convicted of murder last

June.r
"Had you been given any in-
structions as what to say at youra
trial?" Sprague asked.k
"YES, SIR, by William Turn-v
blazer and Albert Pass," Prater{
replied. Turnblazer, 52, also of!
Middlesboro, Ky., and president of,
District 19, is charged with mur-
der in the case. He has pleaded
guilty to federal charges of violat-
ing the Yablonskis civil rights and'
is expected to be the chief prosecu-
tion witness.
Asked what instructions Boyle
gave him, Prater replied: "He
told me to 'stick with your story
and, even if you're convicted,
stick with your story."'
U n d e r cross - examination
by Charles Moses, Boyle's chief
counsel, Pater said he had never
testified before about Boyle's visit.
Moses also read a portion of a-
hand-written statement Prater had,
made to authorities in w h i c h
he quoted Prater as say-
ing: "On at least two occasions
Albert Pass told mne Tony Boyle did
not know anything about the plan
to murder Yablonski."

i

Featuring works
by Jose Limon,
Doris Humphrey,
Elizabeth Bergmann,
Vert Embreee,
and students

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
> "t Jrr, r4,_ j 4 , , ig-w. ryrr 'r,s rrrmx }},,,}

Saturday, April
Day Calendar
Baseball: U-M vs. Eastern Michigan,
Fisher Stadium, 1 pm.
Music School: K. Holen, flute, SM
Recital Hall, 2:30 pm.
University Dancers in Concert: Power
Ctr., 3 & 8 pm.
Music School: Javanese gamelan mu-
sic, dance; J. Beckher, director, Rack-
ham Aud., 8 pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SBR,764-7456
Interviewing on Campus: Apr. 8:
Reesevelt U. seeking candidates for
Lawyer's Asst. Prog.; Apr. 18, 19: Balti-
more, Defense Contract Admin. seek-
ing entry level employees for 05 &
07 grades; Apr. 24: Teacher Corps.
FSEE written exam will be given:
sat. Apr. 6, May 4 June 1 and on
Thurs. April 11 and May 9. This is your
last opportunity to take the PSEE un-
til October.
THE VOICE 0 FAMERICA: Candi-
dates now being considered for East
Asia Pacific Broadcast Trainee prog.
Writing ability and strong bkgd in
Asian Studies required. Ck with this
office for Complete details and applic.
instructions.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763-4117
City of Flint, Mi. Summre Mgt. In-
tern Prog. for graduate students ma-
joring in bus. public admin., public
policy, urban affairs/mgt. Appls. and

details available.
BASF Wyandotte Corp., Wyandotte, I
MI. Will interview Tues., Apr. 9, 9:30 to1
5. Juniors in chemical and mechanical t
engr. work in Engrs. Dept. at Plant/
Maintenance Services. Call and Regis-
ter.
Classic Crafts Corp., MI. Will inter-
view Apr. 10 and 11, 9 to 5. Earn $2000
plus for the summer (13 weeks). Must
have own transportation, be free to
travel. All expenses paid. Register.
Good Humor Corj., Detroit. Will in-
terview Apr. 10, 9 to 5. Last call to get
set for a big money job this summer.
Spend your summer outdoors.
State of Michigan, Dept. Social Serv.
Mich. Migrant Prog. covering seasonal
positions beginning in April/first of~
May. Must be fluent in Spanish. De-
tails and applications available.

I

Horsefeathers
WITH
THE MARX
BROTHERS
ADMISSION 75c
Showinqs at 8 &10

SHOW TIMES
Mon.-Sat., 7:15 & 9:00

I

UNIVERSITY DAN
at POWER CENTER
Friday, April 5; Saturday, April 6; Sunday, AprilI
Young People's Matinee Saturday, April 6at
New Works by Student Choreographers Sunday, Ap
EVEN I NG PERFORMANCES $3.00

[CERS

Sun., 5:30,

7:15, 9:00

7 at 8 p.m.
t 3 p.m.
rHI 7 at 3 p.m.
MATINEES $).50

THURSDAY
SATURDAY

FRIDAY
SUNDAY

Tickets available at Power Center Box Office 12-4 p.m.

11

COMMUNITY
TAX SERVICE
665-4664
No rip-off hidden charcges!
People mindedtax preparationr
Drop by at
333 SOUTH 4TH AVENUE
(Next to YMCA here in
Ann Arbor
665-4664

Couzens Cafeteria
Couzens Film Co-op

BOOGIE!!
TONITE'
CELEBRATE THE NEW $5 WEED
LAW WITH
The ROCKETS
and
The VIPERS
cnd
ALL THE BEER YOU CAN DRINK
Sat., Apr. 6
Carpenter Hall

POM POM GIRL
or Foota an Basketball
Cheerleader Squad
APRIL 11, 7 P.M.
CRISLER ARENA

Staying in A2

This

Summer?

SO

ARE

WE!

May thru August, the Michigan Daily is pub-

Ii shed Tuesday
are in session.

thru Saturday while

classes

STAY

INFORMED !

Ii

For Summer Subscriptions

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan