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January 16, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pane Three

...~

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Solzhenitsyn hits writers union
'for expelling fellow novelist

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AP Photo
Migrant workers die in crash
Nineteen Mexican farm laborers were killed and 28 others injured yesterday when this bus carrying
them to work missed a turn in the predawn darkness and plunged into a drainage canal in rural
southern California.
EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY:
Petroleumcntos-e

WASHINGTON (Reuter)-T h e
Nixon Administration yesterday
put its sweeping mandatory fuel
control program into operation,
placing most of the burden of
saving fuel on individual home-
owners and small businesses.
The final rules for the alloca-
tion scheme technically require
Americans to turn down thermo-
stats in their homes by six de-
grees below the level of last win-
ter or run the risk of going
through a pile of red tape to get
more fuel.
The 37-pages of rules publish-
ed into law in the federal register
give top priority for fuel use to
food production, government
emergency services, television
and radio stations, mass transit
and medical care facilities.
WHAT IS LEFT over after all

those needs are met will be avail-
able to non-priority customers -
such as motorists and homeown-
ers - basically on a first come,
first served basis.
John Sawhill, deputy administra-
tor of the Federal Energy Of-
fice, acknowledged at a p r e s s
briefing it would be "vary dif-
ficult to enforce" the require-
ment that people turn dow-i their
thermostats.
But he was optimistic Ameri-
cans wouldrespondvoluntarily
to fuel conservation measures.

to homeowners who ignored the
new rules, he replied: "The fed-
eral government isn't going to let
them (the violators) freeze to
death."
Provisions of the regulations
would allow those without home
heating fuel to appeal to special
emergency boards in each state
for an allocation from stockpiles
held in reserve by local agencies.
About three to four per cent of
the country's total fuel supplies
are held in these stockpiles.
For the average American; the
mandatory scheme will probably
be felt most at the gasoline sta-
tion. The energy office estimates
that providing priority customers
with enough fuel will leave about
20 per cent less gasoline in the
supply pipeline than would have
been available this spring if the
Arab boycott had not been im-
posed last October.

Y4C
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MOSCOW OP) - Alexander Solz- ator," indicating it was the work
henitsyn, in his first public state- of the paper's editorial board, the:
men since publication of his new i weekly devoted more than half a
book "Gulag Archipelago," s a i d page to an attack on Solzhenitsyn,
yesterday an elderly and ill nov- his book and the "reactionaries"
elist was expelled from the of- in the West who supposedly are;
ficial Soviet Writers Union be- manipulating him.
cause she allowed him to workI
at her dacha. The commentary concluded by1
a comparing the writer to a rep ile1
His written statement, made who fears the sun: "In daylight,
available to Western correspond- reptiles always look disgusting." t
ents, did not deal with the storm of The article said the book, which
official abuse that has broken over deals with the history of the Sov-
him since the Paris publication of iet labor camp system, "may seem
his book about the Stalinist prison to some Western readers t h a t!
camp system. Solzhenitsyn is only against the
Instead, Solzhenitsyn spoke of the facts of violations of Socialist le-
Jan. 10 expulsion from the writers gality which took place in our his-
union of 66-year-old Lidiya Chuko-tory, but which have bean de-
vskaya. There was no indication cisively condemned by our party."
he was reay to break his silence
about "Gulag Archipelago," t h e
furious Soviet official reaction to ----- CLIP AND SAVEto ri n h
the book, or speculation on what I:
action the government might take ,
against him.:
SOLZHENITSYN said he h a d ' # ALM
"no doubt that the inspiring push"IE
to the expulsion of Miss Chukovs-E+
kaya "was revenge that she has 3
given me an opportunity to workE Phone Numbers
in her dacha country house in E
Peredelkino."
I + CirculationE
Another reason for the action + E
against her, he said, was "to 764-0558
frighten others who would decide + E
to follow her example." 1
Solzhenitsyn mentioned that for I Classified Adv.
three years he livedat the dacha1E
of famed cellist Mstislav Rostro-. A Ey
povich, and "for three years they;:64-0557
constantly and cruely hasassed ;i
Rostropovich." +
:Display Adv.
SOLZHENITSYN moved ou: ofi +
the Rostropovich dacha last year : 764-0554
and stayed at another dacha. His E
wife has a Moscow apartment but1:
the author has so far not been eu
granted a permit to live in Mos- News
cow. 764-0552
Yesterday's edition of the news- I +
paper of the Soviet Writers Un- I
ion denounced himaas "an enemy ports
of his motherland, an enemy of his a
compatriots, and the enemy of 764-0562
everything which is dear and sac- 4 56
red for each of us." ,
The paper, Literaturnaya Gazeta, y--- CLIP AND SAVE .----E
stopped just short of calling the
author "an enemy of the people" ..-.
the phrase which amounted to a
death sentenceduring the periods _
of Stalinist terror treated in I it rrrA vin

ENGINEERING

* COMPUTER SCIENCI

E "

4-
UNPRECEDENTED WORK ...
UNPARALLELED OPPORTUNITY.
CAREERSATTHE NATIONAL tSE U IY ANC

MATHEMATICS
"e cipher is, eno
th aw rld's oest c rypo
graphic devices, is a crude
forerunner of the sophisti-
cated communications secur-
ity systems being developed
and tested at NSA today.$#

"BUT SOLZHENITSYN u s e s
these facts to lie about the Sov-
iet people, to erase all its vic-
tories and accomplishments," the
paper said in today's edition, made
available last night.
Literaturnaya Gazeta was the
first Soviet publication to state,
that the new book, legally unavail-
able in the Soviet Union, was bas-
ed on fact.I
It was the first public word from
the author since publication of the
book.

1
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.*,
;
IG dr/1 C
l

I.

Bar-Restaurant
and Riding Club
Watch For Opening
Corner of Forest
and South University

r

ASKED WHAT would happen

Because of the nature and scope of the Na-
tional Security Agency's mission, we can offer
job challenge and career opportunities that
are impossible to match.
AT NSA, we are responsible for designing and
developing secure! invulnerable communica-
tions and EDP systems to transmit, receive
and analyze much of our nation's most vital
information. The advancing technologies ap-
plied in this work are such that they will fre-
quently take you beyond the known and
accepted boundaries of knowledge. Conse-
quently, your imagination and resourcefulness
are essential qualifications for success.
The Career Scene at NSA: Engineers will find
work which is performed nowhere else .
devices and systems are constantly being de-
veloped which are the most advanced in the
Western World. As an Agency engineer, you
will carry out research, design, development,
testing and evaluation of sophisticated, large-
sca"e cryptocommunication and EDP systems.
You may also participate in related studies of
electromagnetic propagation, upper atmos-
phere phenomena, and solid state devices us-
ing the latest equipment for advanced research
within NSA's fully instrumented laboratories.
Mathematicians define, formulate and solve
complex communications-related problems.
Statistical mathematics, matrix algebra, and
combinatorial analysis are but a few of the
tools applied by Agency mathematicians. Op-

portunities for contributions in computer
sciences and theoretical research are also
offered.
Computer Scientists participate in systems
analysis and systems programming related to
advanced scientific and operational applica
tions. Software design and development is
included, as well as support in hardware de-
sign, development and modification.
Starting salaries are based on education and
experience, and increase as you assume addi-
tional responsibility. Further, you will enjoy
the varied career benefits and other advan-
tages of Federal employment without the
necessity of Civil Service certification.
Check with your Placement Office for further
information about NSA, or write to: Chief,
College Relations Branch, National Security
Agency, Ft. George G.. Meade, Md. 20755,
Attn: M321. An equal opportunity employer,
M/F. NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number a
Wednesday, January 16, 1974
Is edited and managed by students atj
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail other
states and foreign).

I

if
you
see
news

Solzhenitsyn's new book. RIKIrLt fEA TARE
TN AN ARTICLE sinned "ter- MEA T BAL L&

----. \ 1+li yit 0t 71'l~l

............
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AA 41

happen

call
76-DAILY

mommommol

U.

1

Park West Galleries
ANNOUNCES
AN
art auction
SUNDAY, JANUARY 20 AT 2 P.M.
exhibit starting at 1 p.m.
ot
HOLIDAY INN WEST
2900 Jackson Road-Ann Arbor, Michigan
LITHOGRAPHS * ETCHINGS 0 SERIGRAPHS 0 DRAWINGS
* PAINTINGS * WATERCOLORS 0 POSTERS, etc. Featuring
hand signed graphics pulled from editions limited to from 10
to 300.
ARTISTS REPRESENTED INCLUDE:
Albers 0 Appel * Anuskiewicz 0 Braque 0 Boulanger 0 Buffet
" Colder 0 Cezanne 0 Chagall Dali 0 Friedlaender * Got
" Giacometti 0 Goya Hwang 0 Jansem 0 Lautrec 0 Liberman
" Lindner * Nieman 0 Marini 0 Max " Matisse " Miro
" Picasso 0 Reuben Renoir 0 Silva 0 Vasarely * and many
others.
Catalogues available during preview. (All art absolutely guoan-
teed to be genuine as described.)
24151 Telegraph Road
Park West Galleries Between 9 & 10 Mile Rds.

I

OPEN DAILY 12 NOON"4823300

SEX CLINIC GIRLS
I CONTACT
SPECIAL FEA TURE
the BIRDS & the BEA DS
orLE&HCINEMI

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Y 7116i I& ITWVII -WUL UVUU
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31 N: IS.NINGTON.YPSILANTI 1

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LA

... WHERE IMAGINATION IS THE
ESSENTIAL QUALIFICATION

BOOK SALE
At LOGOS This Week

Scholar's books in numerous fields. From
Harvard, Yale, Michigan, Oxford, Cam-
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DISCOUNTS from 20% to 60%
ALSO
Four volume encyclopedia of philosophy
$99.50 retail for $85.00

logos
bookstore

Open 9:00-

-9:30

onday-Saturday
1205 South University
761-7177

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Southfield, Mich. (313) 354-2343
iii I I
Loma Linda Beef Taco, enchilada,
frijoles, and Mexican rice
$1.50
MICHELOB by the pitcher
$2.50
Music & Dancing
FEATURING
TY and TOM
THURS. THRU SAT.
located at intersections of Broadway,
Pontiac Trail, and Plymouth Road
$1.50

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