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February 09, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, February 9, 19-74 I

TH,.~GNDIL audy ebur ,17

Money troubles

By DAVID WHITING
Due to the city's growing budget
deficit, local day care centers are
in serious danger of losing the ma-
jority of their funding, according
to several City Council members.
Last April the council budgeted
$455,000 to social services out of
revenue sharing money returned to
the city by the federal govern-
ment. Of that total almost half,
or $200,000, went to day care ser-
vices.
ACCORDING TO Mike Rodgers,
who is assistant to the city admin-
istrator and in charge of social
service allocations, there will be
no revenue-sharing money in the
city's budget this April.
The city's present deficit is $1.4
million. The deficit has already
become a key issue in the upcom-
ing elections as shown by the pre-
liminary campaign statements.
Rodgers claims that all depart-
ments in the city are running on
tight budgets and many, such as
the police and fire departments,
need new equipment. As Richard
Sadler (R-Fourth Ward) puts it,
"something's got to give," and

therefore "the social services will
get a hard look."
COLBURN'S prediction of a sub-
stantial decrease in day care
funding is a point on which all
three city parties agree. Carol
Jones (D-Second Ward) states,
"As long as we have a Republi-
can majority in council you will
not see any money go to social
services."
Nancy Wechsler (Human Rights
Party-First Ward) differs some-
what: "I think the Republicans
are susceptible to pressure from
child care groups . . . but it is
unlikely there is going to be any
money (for child care)."
Last April's budget was voted on
by the council before the cityf
elections. At that time, HRP de-
manded that more money go into
social services than either the
Democrats or the Republicans re-
commended.

This year's budget will be ap-
proved after the city elections.
Both Wechsler and Jones disa-
gree with Rodgers' evaluation of
city departments. Jones says,
"The police department could do
the same job they're doing now
on less money." Wechsler recom-
mends that the city "take money
from executive salaries or the po-
lice branch."

rut be
William Colburn (R-Third Ward),
chairman of the council's social
services subcommittee, does not
"see a cut in the police force,"
while for next year he does "see
a social service cut . . . the knife
will fall to the point where some
of them (day care centers) are
cut off completely."
Colburn, who is up for re-elec-
tion in the Fourth Ward, says if he

family income is $5,000 to $6,000,
and at the Corntree Center almost'
two-thirds of the families earn
under $6,000 with one-third #earn-
ing less than $3,000 a year.
CONSEQUENTLY, a raise in
tuition could cause difficulty for
many families. Private day care
centers with fees around $35 a
week are already too high for
many to afford, according to Dick-
son.

al

daycare

Community Co-ordinated Child
Care (Four C's) forecast "a dras-
tic curtailment of services" if
funds are significantly decreased.
' FOUR C's, which received $77,-
000 from the city last year, is the
umbrella organization for city-as-
sisted day care centers. Its func-
tion is to offer such services as a
toy library, a no-interest loan
fund, and help with organization
for the centers.

where some of them (day care cen-
ters) are cut off completely.'
-William Colburn (R-Third Ward)

Lucille Tueson of Ann Arbor Over 360 children attend city-
Child Care and Development com- assisted day care centers each
ments, "It is a matter of sup- week day, and most of the centers
porting day care or the mothers have waiting lists. Only one, the
going back on welfare. Child care Infant Drop Center situated at
.allows the parents to work or go Community High School, accepts
to school." children under two years old.
Rodgers and Jones have been Day care is only available from
investigating possible funding for 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. but the Chil-
the day care centers from sources dren's Community Center offers
outside the city, particularly the babysitting Friday and Saturday
state or United Fund. Asked nights at 50 cents an hour.
about the status of these applica-
tions for aid, Rodgers could only Day care facilities must be i-
say he is "still hoping." censed by the state for a maxi-
saymu number of children'ati n mst

L

SINCE HRP and the Democrats
then made up the majority of the
council, the Democrats were per-
suaded to endorsea higher social
service allocation.
I

:
.

.~:"".....t i}"}. .i4V."i:'rani.

I

PARK TERRAICE
Fall Rentals
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Deluxe 1-2-3 Bedroom Apts.
e Fully furnished & carpeted
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r Locked storage
0 Live-in resident manager
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0@24 hr. emergency service
0 Burglar alarm system for each apt.
* Cable TV-free
See Brent or Sharon Clark,
Apt. 10-769-5014

- 1

THE REPUBLICANS "have no is re-elected he will "probably
party position on social services," consider" running in the next
Hadler claims. However, he says, mayoral race.
"the day care centers in Ann Ar-.
bor are going to have to present HE ANTICIPATED "a $30,000 to
"outstanding records of perform- $40,000 lump sum" will be given
ance to be reincluded" in the bud- to the day care centers this spring.
get. Rodgers estimates that it costs
$30 a week to keep a child at a
city day care center. No center
in Ann Arbor has been receiving'
close to that sum per child.

Rodgers is now evaluating the
day care centers.
ALL THE revenue - sharing day
care centers are very doubtful
about their future existence. Two
say they expect to close. Elaine
Rubin of the Child Care Action
Center says there is "a strong pos-
sibility that we're going to have
to close." Tueson says if funds are
cut off, Ann Arbor Child Care and

meet strict specifications if hot
food is to be served. Space re-
quirements need to be met and
one adult must be present Wor
every five children. City doltars
presently help cover these mini-
mum standards along with other
costs.
"i -.r,.# i":g{vS4 .. .
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
s n v{ :r'. ' . -e' }i4.SWa : 9, -m

BEHIND THEf
DOUBLE FEATURE
CAMPUS GIRLS
PLUS
THE SEXUALIST
ar&CINEMA

.

Development
have to close."

will "eventually

Using Rodgers' figure, Colbu
estimated appropriation of $35
would be enough to cover thec
of only one center caring for
children over a year.
IF CITY aid is cut this dras
ally, Rodgers says, "somec
ters may be forced to raise th
tuition."
Gwen Dickson, director of B
el Day Care Center, also belie
that it may be necessary to ra
tuition, but points out, "Somep
ents already have trouble payirn
The day care centers givep
ference to welfare and low-inc
families. At the Child Care Ac
Center, for example, the aver

rn's
,02
Cost
22 1

i

Other directors, including Pat
Horn, head of the Washtenaw
THS MICHIGAN PAIINV
Volume LXXXIV, Number 109

Saturday, February 9
Day Calendar

I

I

L

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LIONESS ... We've only'just begun-
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Love T. Beor XO

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Call 761-0991
or 761-2274

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