100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I. IL.. DV'.S~....I I#%.JJ ~1 '4 L.j, XIL. I

r-ge r III

..

tish miners reject

SUITS FILED
Psychologist witch'fired

last ditch Heath

plea

LONDON (Reuter) - Britain's
coalminers refused to call off
their impending strike yesterday
despite warnings that it could
inflame the coming election and
possibly harm their own support-
ers in the opposition Labor Party.
The decision reinforced expec-
tations that campaigning up to
the Feb. 28 polling date will rate
among the most savage exper-
ienced in British electoral his-
tory.
THE COAL stoppage is certain
to darken Britain's economic
crisis still further.
The executive committee of
the miner's union took four hours
of discussion to throw out Thurs-
day's appeal by Prime Minister
Edward Heath to suspend the na-
tionwide strike due to start at
midnight today.
Heath set the election date-
which falls some 17 months be-
fore his term officially expires-

after a long unsuccessful struggle
to persuade the miners to accept
the wage raise limits contained
in his anti-inflation code.
IN PRELIMINARY campaign
skirmishes, it seemed clear the
ruling conservatives planned to
pitch their campaign on the is-
sue of "Who Rules Britain?"
Labor party leader Harold Wil-
son clearly sought to head off
this line of attack in a foreward
that was published yesterday
along with the party's campaign
manifesto.
"This election is not about the
miners," Wilson said. He accused
Heath of calling the election in
a panic because his government
was overwhelmed by inflation.
WILSON SOUGHT to swing at-
tention on to inflation and other
issues including the European
Common Market which, until
eclipsed by the issue in Britain,
rated as a hot political issue in

Britain. A series of opinion polls
has indicated popular dissatisfac-
tion with the results of Brit-
ain's 13-month-old membership
in the European community.
Wilson pledged: "We shall re-
store to the British people the
right to decide the final issue of
British membership in the Com-
mon Market." This was a reiter-
ation of the Labor pledge to re-
negotiate the terms of British
market membership.
Wilson promised to settle the
coalmine dispute by negotiation
and to control prices. Labor has
persistently complained that the.
conservatives concentrated on
keeping down wages but let pric-
es soar.
In most political circles t h e
miners' decision to push ahead
with their strike rated as an ad-
vantage for the conservatives. In-
dustrial unrest is commonly sup-
posed to react unfavorably
against labor's electoral chances.

HUTCHITNSON, Kan. (UPI) - suit at Wichita accuses the Wichita
Psychologist Bob Williams got a Eagle and Beacon of breach of con-
lot of ribbing from friends when fidentiality and invasion of privacy,
they learned he practices witch- because the newspaper published
craft. Somebody asked him if his a story detailing Williams' beliefs
broom was overparked. after the reporter allegedly prom-
ised Williams his name would not
BUT THE JOKE quickly soured be used.
when Williams was fired as chief1
psychologist at the Kansas State E "I NEVER had any intention of
Industrial Reformatory. Now he's - attracting personal attention with
fighting-not with spells or sorcery all this," Williams said in an in-
but with a lawyer and a pile of terview.
legal briefs-to get back his job' But now, mostly because of the
and reputation. principles at issue, he has vowed
Williams, an unassuming fellow to fight and has drawn a flurry of
whose balding pate and chubby attention from Kansas-more ac-1
build conjure no images of old customed to dealing with funda-
crones dancing around a bubbling mentalist preaches t h a n spell-
cauldron, has filed appeals against chanting witches.
the man who fired him, the news- "I guess the question is what is
paper that exposed him and with loss of credibility," Williams said.
the State Civil Service Board, "I can't see there was any differ-
which could rehire him. ence in my relationships with any-
The superintendent of the re. one. I got a minor amount of kid-

WILLIAM BELIEVES. that his
witchcraft practice has never in-
terfered with his work and may
actually have helped it.
"The only way that anyone
basically uses the craft is to make
themselves a more sensitive and
aware person," he said. "Evil has
absolutely no role at all."
WHAT WITCHCRAFT does in-
volve-although Williams hesitated
to discuss secret rituals-is daily
meditation, special festivals at cer-
tain times in the year and some
spell-casting.
"You would light a small candle
or burn some incense but beyond
that there's nothing mysterious
about it. In private you might do
it without your clothes on," he
said, adding in the same breath
that any suggestion that overt sex
is involved "is a libel."
Neither the newspaper nor super-
intendent Oliver would commenton
the suits while they are still pend-
ing. The state attorney general's
office is defending the superin-
tendent. Williams' attorney said if
the suit against the Eagle-Beacon
is won it will be the first time to
his knowledge a Kansas newspaper
has had to pay damages for breach
of confidentiality.

AP Photo
End of an era
Astronaut William Pogue steps from the Skylab III command
module aboard USS New Orleans yesterday following 84 days
in orbit. NASA spokespersons claimed the Skylab mission proves
"America can do anything in manned space flight that it so
desires." It will be at least another decade before the U.S.
attempts another long-term space flight.

formatory, Kenneth Oliver, fired
Williams Jan. 18 because of "a loss
of credibility with those with whom
he must work." Oliver has been
accused in federal district court of
violating Williams' right to prac-
tice his own kind of religion under
the first amendment.
Another federal district court

ding, but nothng that seemed to
amount to anything."
Shortly after the first newspaper
story appeared in November, the
head of the state penal system de-
manded his resignation. When it
didn't come, superintendent Oliver
sent Williams a formal letter of
termination.

'RADICALS' CHARACTERIZED

Prof. s
By JONATHAN FRERICHS
What phenomenon in contem-
porary society can account for
George Wallace's popularity, the
Pontiac anti-busing campaign,
President Nixon's landslide victory
over McGovern in 1972, the April
1973 meat boycott, and the recent
widespread truckers' protests?
According to Donald Warren, a
University research sociologist,
citizens he calls "Middle Ameri-
can Radicals" have been a ma-
jor cause of all these events.
WARREN BEGAN his research
in the area during 1971 on a grant
from the Ford Foundation to study
the Wallace movement and its im-
plications. This led to a national
survey -directed at specific issues,
such as anti-busing controversies
and the meat boycott.
Warren says the boycott pro-
vides a good example of what he
and his fellow researchershasso-
ciate with the Middle American
ideology - "a national action in-
volving a problem directly affect-
ing many families and one which
had not previously occurred nor
been carried out within the pur-
view of a union, protest group or
other 'established' structure."
This group, which Warren says
emerges during periods of "appro-
priate stress" such as the late '60s,
consists largely of people in the
lower white collar and middle and
upper blue collar levels. However,
the group is more accurately,
characterized by a common ideol-
ogy, Warren says.
"THEY HAVE a lot of trust in
the system, but it's being thwarted
by interest groups and their own
interest group does nbt have much
to say." According to Warren, such
dissatisfaction is directed at socie-
tal groups above and below them,
the rich and the poor, who appear;
to enjoy special government treat-
ment.
Warren says he uses the term
'radical sin the traditional sense
-- because the group shares fun-
damental principles of action.
In the past, "Middle Ameri-
cans," who comprise about one
quarter of the population, were
amply represented by the church
and the unions. Now the church.
seems to be courting other groups
and the union leadership is out of
touch, Warren claims.

tudies Middle America

CUcA 1ptirh'4A 'erice4

HE EMPHASIZES that "Middle
American Radicals see formal or-
ganizations not holding to clear cut
rules and not being responsive to
their own concerns."
A popular stereotype of Middle
Americans identifies them with Ar-
chie Bunker. But Warren is quick
to note that Archie's rancorous buf-
foonery disqualifies him from be-
coming a folk hero to this group.
Warren's research suggests that
Middle American Radicals are not
more prejudiced than other groups,
but rather are mare open in ex-
pressing their prejudice.
NEITHER the Republicans nor
the Democrats can claim the votes
of this substantial minority of the
voting public. Nixon received their
support in 1972, Warren reasons,
because Wallace had been remov-
ed from the race. McGovern, with
his following of the poor, affluent
liberals, college students, blacks,
chicanos and anti-war dissidents,
was the epitome of what they re-
sented on the American political
scene.
In the future, Warren specu-
lates, Ronald Reagan might re-'
ceive Middle American Radical
support but is possibly not "grass
rootsy" enough. Ted Kennedy riv-
aled Wallace in 1971-72, according
to Warren's data.
During city elections Middle
Americans have cast their ballots
for the "spokesmen of the New
Populism," such as Charles Sten-;
vig in Minneapolis, Louise Day
Hicks in Boston, and Newark's An-1
thony Imperiale - candidates
pulled from their own ranks.
WARREN'S DATA shows that a,
major expectation the group has
of government is that it must de-
liver at the local level and on the
issues that affect their lives. I
Hence, a Middle American is will-
ing to delegate more power to
those in authority if that's what it
takes ,for governmental institutions
to increase services, for police to
decrease crime or for welfare ag-I
encies to alleviate poverty. E
As with the present truckers'
road blocks, Middle American
Radicals generally undertake "ins-
dividualized, informal, temporary,
action." They are not likely to
form an organization like the AMA,'
Warren explains.
Placing the group on the politi-

cal spectrum is difficult since one
cannot follow the traditional logic
of the left or the right.
Liberals and conservatives are
often distrusted equally, Warren
claims.
MIDDLE American Radicals
would reject socialism on the ba-
sis of a strong attachment to in-
dividualism, Warren asserts, for
many in this group have moved in
and out of entrepreneurship. How-
ever they accept positive govern-
mental action through social pro-
grams such as social security.
Although they evidence dimen-
sions, of paranoia and authoritar-
ianism, Warren suggests, it would

bearings. They see problems of
human nature, rather than struc-
tural problems.
THUS, WATERGATE only con-
firms Middle American distrust
of those in power, Warren explains.
It does not mean to them that the
Presidency and Congress should
be reconstituted. And they would
be happier with resignation than
impeachment, Warren thinks, since
the latter appears an arrogant leg-
islative exercise.
Also, Warren sees trouble for
the U. S. in one of the factors
which the data showed character-
izes the origins of Middle Ameri-
can Radicals, namely, their lack

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN1
CHAPEL (Lutheran Church-
Missouri Synod)!
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor,
Sunday Morning Services at 9:15
and at 10:30.I
Sunday Morning Bible Study at{
9:15.
Wednesday Evening Worship at
10:00.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST j
CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-!
TION-State at Huron and Wash.
Sunday, Feb. 10:l
Sermon by Rev. Bart Beavin,
Wesley Foundation Campus Min-'
ister: "Why Are We Here?"
8:30-9:00 a.m.-Communion Serv-

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH UNIVERSITY REFORMED
OF CHRIST CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr. isters
Associate Ministers: Dennis R. Services at 10:30 a.m.
Brophy and Howard F. Gebhart. 5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
9 a.m.-Morning Prayer. * * *
10 a.m. - Worship Service and CAMPUS CHAPEL
Church School. 1 1236 Washtenaw Court

Min-

* * .*
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH.
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1679 Broadway-across from
Baits Dr., North Campus
8:30 and 10:00 a.m. - Holy Eu-
charist.
10:00 a.m.--Morning Worship.
Child care provided.

A popular stereotype of Middle Americans iden-
tifies them with Archie Bunker. But Warren is
quick to note that Archie's rancorous buffoon-
ery disqualifies him from becoming a folk hero
to this group.
take a great deal of time and frus- 1 of formal education beyond high
tration to make them anti-demo- school. He reasons that high
cratic. schools are failing to "universal-
What does the existence of the ize" their students' outlook in the
Middle American Radical mean way that further education seems
about our society? For one thing, to.
"They have something to say and High school graduates become
we ought to listen," says Warren. solidified in their belief systems,
In contrast to frequently heard Warren asserts, while the culture
calls for changing the system, the they live in grows more diverse.
Middle American feels that the in- The resultant divisions in society
stitutions are basically sound, but are magnified as more people at-
the people in control have lost their tend universities.
LAST NIGHT TONIGHT
Bob Rofelson-Best Director
Five Easy Pieces
--BEST FILM

1 block N. of University Towers
on S. Forest
The Rev. Don Postema
Coffee at 10 a.m.
Worship Service at 10:15 a.m.
6 p.m.-Celebration of Holy Com-
munion.
* * *
BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH
John A. Woods, Pastor
900 Plum St.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
Church Phone-NO 3-3800
Services:
Sunday School-9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship-10:30 a.m.
210S. FIFTH AV
761-i

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division
665-0606
Holy Eucharist at Noon in St.
Andrew's Church.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 306 S. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and
Sermon.
12:00 noon - Canterbury House
Eucharist.
7:00 p.m. - Evening Prayer in
Chapel.
* **
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC, LCA)
801 S. Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday Morning:
Study Class-9:1S a.m.
Worship Service--10:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper-6:15 p.m.
Program-7:00 p.m.

ice. * * *
9:30and 11:00 a.m. - Worship FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Services. 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
9:00-12:30 a.m.-Nursery Care. j Ministers: Robert E. Sanders, John
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Church R. Waser, Brewster H. Gere, Jr.
School (thru Grade 5). "Where many students worship"
9:30-10:30 a.m. - Church School Services at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
(thru Grade 8). on Sundays.
10:30-11:00 a.m.-Coffee-Conver- Sermon topic for Feb. 10: "On;
sation-Fellowship. Learning to Pray."
Broadcast on WNRS (1290) AM ---
and WNRZ (103) FM from 11:00- Try Daily Classifieds
12 :00 noon.

E., ANN ARBOR
9700

I

NUMUSIC presents

DID SAEE
VISIT EARTH is
HAvE PRoorl!BAS

510 'BLAIR ,withVION
"THE 12 PIECE ELECTRIC
JAZZ EXPERIENCE"
PIONEER HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
SAT., FEB. 9
Absolutely the Finest
New Big Band Anywhere
Tickets at Discount Records
$2.00 1235 S. University
New Morning Book
S. Washington & Fourth
And at the Door

5EPOrN E

151

*.:

CONTROVERSIAL
BOOK THAT
SHATTERED
CONVENTIONAL
THEORIES Of
HISTORY AND
ARCHEOLOGY

I

Jack
nomineeI

Nicholson
Best Actor

Karen Black
Best Supporting Actress

'I

SHOWTIMES
Mon.-Fri. 7:00-9:00
Sat. & Sun. 1-3-5-7-9

I

7

,f

SUNDAY ONLY

FEBRUARY 10

F
{
i}tft}t '
i
Q :.
.y
"t

The incredible adventures a
MARJO
ACADEMY AWARD-BEST DOCUN
The amazing true story of the young trickste
started his hustling career as an ordained Bapt
the age of 4. Sweeping the country with his
series of fiery revivals, Marjoe made national h
won the hearts (and secretly picked the pock
devotees from coast to coast.' Great comedy
genuine in style and narration, with recent it
Marjoe in his new life as a hip young Americar

r )
f
E
AENTARY
r Marjoe who
ist minister at
parents in a
eadlines as he
;ets) of Jesus
-marvelously
nterviews with
n.
0v PoD)

He Said f
Karen Black
Bruce Dern
Disenchantment of an all-
American j o c k: Basketball
can't be everything, nor can
Karen Black as an indolent fac-
ulty wife; nor Michael Margot-
to and his freak-out at the in-
duction c e n t e r. So, what is
everything? "Your M o t h e r
Called ...
both 7:30 & 9:30 films

ummer
.

-and-

Ublot A rta You Can Place 'A
upp'e w~e t 41 Col. x 4" AD
r /
1 /
r /
1 /
r /
I U
r /
1 /I
Print or Type Copy Legibly in Space- ;
r /
Provided as You Would Like it to Appear.
r
' MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO
r THE MICHIGAN DAILY
1
I /
1 1 "I \ "/ h A

FOR ONLY $7

ALSO

i

J

a short by D. Pennebaker (Monterc

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan