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October 04, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P+rge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday. October 4. 1973 T

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Mental Health Research Institute
THURSDAY SEMINAR
PHILLP TEITELBAUM
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
"Somnolence, activation, and sensory
control of food intake after
lateral hypothalmic damage"
tea 3:15 MHRI
talk 3:45 MHRI

SUBPOENAS MAY COME:
I Judge in Agnew inquiry s
cautions jury on news leaks

ITELTRAN delayed

.1

licensed qualified
physicians

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(Continued from Page 1)
gating crimes against the United
States no matter who it involves.
He cautioned them to keep their
work secret even after it is com-
pleted and directed them to dis-
regard personal.political views in
the interest of justice.
HOFFMAN, A Virginia judge
brought into the case after rll nine
federal judges in Maryland dis-
qualified themselves because of
friendship with Agnew, said news
reporters "are integral and neces-
sary parts of our lives" who some-
times stray from the truth.
Agnew has denounced news
leaks about the investigation blam-
ing the Justice Department
sources, and has labeled "damned
lies" published allegations that he
conspired to extort bribes from
contractors, sometimes in t he
guise 'of political campaign con-
tributions.
In a speech last Saturday, the
vice president singled out Asst.
--

Atty. Gen. Henry Petersen as the
source of damaging leaks. He al-
leged that the Justice Department
official was embarrassed by failure
in Watergate and was trying to
make Agnew a scapegoat to re-
store his own reputation.
HOFFMAN TOOK judicial .note
of leaked news stories and told the
jurors-18 members of the 22-mem-
ber panel were present--not to be
"improperly influenced" by them.
He asked to be advised if they felt,
they were. I
"In the present-day grab for pri-
ority in getting news items, the
news media frequently overlook
the. rights of others, especially
where criminal matters are in-
volved," Hoffman said.
"We are rapidly approaching the
day when the perpetual conflict be-
tween the news media, operating
as they do under freedom of speech
and freedom of the press, and the
judicial system charged with pro-
tecting the rights of persons under
investigation for criminal acts
must be resolved."
Hoffman then ordered the jurors
to resume their deliberations, and
they were escorted back to their
cloistered quarters on the fifth
floor of the courthouse by U.S.
marshals.

sel, concerned about leaks of in-
formation about the probe, report-
edly had requested the meeting
with Hoffman in an effort- to try
to find the sources.
Agnew attorney Jay Topkis re-
fused to confirm the report, reply-
ing, "Why don't, you ask 'the
judge?" TJS. Atty. George Beall
also declined to comment. So did
his three assistants handling the
investigation.,
The only witness known to be
heard yesterday was William Muth,
a 63-year-old Agnew fund raiser
and former Baltimore city council-
man. Muth declined to answer
questions a week ago when he ap-
peared before the grand jury on
the first day of its Agnew probe.
"No questions I answer will be
against Mr. Agnew," Muth told
newsmen yesterday before going
before the panel. "They will have
to beat it out of me."
MUTH WAS GRANTED immun-
ity from prosecution and ordered
to testify or go to jail for contempt.
The Agnew phase of the investi-
gation centers on allegations of
bribery, extortion, conspiracy and
tax violations while he was chief
executive of Baltimore County and

by federal red tape
(Continued from Page 1) "1 ride the buses nearly every
Dial-a-Ride vans presently carry day. I ride to and from work and
about 360 people per day. The city to do shopping. I just wish they
buses have a daily ridership of had something like this in Cali-
about 2,500 persons. When the sys- fornia where I'm moving," Mr.
tems are combined, it is estimated R. B. Mahoney saide Another typi-
daily ridership will climb to 5,000. cal rider, C a t h y Ponitz, com-
mented, "I ride it an awful lot. I
THE BUSES ARRIVE quickly, go to school on it, to cchoir, and
usually within .ten minutes of the just to get places."
call to the dispatchcer. The average When fully expanded the service
ride takes between ten and fifteen will encompass the entire city and
minutes and costs twenty - five several new features will be added.
cents. Plans include call stations to be
While this is slower than going built around the city where a cus-
by car, riders seem to accept this tomer may call for a Dial-a-Ride
as a consequence of using public van instead of summoning it from
transportation and few complain. his home.
Journalists study
underfellwhips

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GIJALLO
PINK CHABLIS
OF CALFORNIA
More than a Rose, our Pink Chablis is a captivating
loin combining the -delicate fragrance of a superior Roi
and the crisp character of a fine Chablis. This wine i o
onr most delightful creations. Made and bottled at the
Gello Vineyards in Modesto, Calif. Alcohol 12% b oL

TIME
Magazin
reports:
"Gallos Pink Chablis
recently -triumphed
over ten costlier
competitors in a blind
tasting among a
panel of wine-industry
executives
in Los Angeles"
Time Magazine November 27, 1972 page 81.

BIVOU .A'C
Army-Navy Surplus
518 E. William
"Ascente" Prime
Goose Down . $48.50
(REGULATION FILL)
Air Force
Parka ......$49498
{6 OZ. FILL, WAIST LENGTH)
Field
Jackets . from $8.95.
Air Force

THE VICE PRESIDENT'S coun-I governor of Maryland in the 1960's.

(Continued fron Page 1)
thoughtful journalists." He is anx-
ious -to fill "specific gaps" in his
own knowledge.
Several fellows, like John Need-
ham, the UPI bureau chief in New-
ark, N.J., have specific goals -in
mind. Although no such position is
open to him as yet, -he plans to
study Chinese language, history,
and culture in case jobs in that field
become available.
Others are buffing up on Japa-
nese history and language, the So-
viet Union, urban affairs, modern
art, transportation and the environ-
ment, and American history.
The journalists represent media
from Honolulu, Tampa, Hartford,
Washington, D.C., Detroit, New-
ark, Baltimore, Findlay, Ohio and
Muskegon, Michigan. The foreign
journalists are from Lahore, Pak-
istan, Djakarta, Indonesia, and
Hong Kong.

1
3
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* 1
ALL-CAMPUS TG
DELTA SIGMA DENTAL FRATERNITY
FRIDAY, OCT. 5-8:00 P.m.
1502 H IL L
LIVE BAND BEER
Huge LIP Record SalE
TODAY
0 fM-1GNOLLETT'~S &

AN ELABORATE screening pro-
cess conducted by the University
was needed to choose some 66 ap-
plicants for the fellowships. Almost
half were subsequently interview-
ed before final selections were
made.
Prof. Ben Yablonky of the jour-
nalism department, the Univer-
sity's director of the program, says
that they looked for "people =who
would maximize their learning ex-
perience here." Close attention
was paid to how the applicant's
proposed courses of study related
to their own intellectual histories.
Yablonky was pleased that such
a "mixed bag" of journalists was
selected, but regrets that the
"three 'minority groups of blacks,
women and broadcasters" were
poorly represented.
He said that this was a reflec-
tion of their status" in journalism
that they didnot have the "level of
security to take a year off their
jobs." Broadcast journalism mana-
gers generally do not feel the need
for specialists in most fields.
THE FUTURE of the program is
not certain, but' Yablonky believes
'it will last, for several years. It
might take that long just to evalu-
ate the idea. He has confidence that
funding will not be a major prob-
lem.
In addition to following their own
areas of study the journalists meet
once a week with guest speakers in
the humanities and once for dis-
cussions concerning journalism.

Parka ..

More than a Rose.

Field Jacket
Liners ......
Army Field
Coats ......

$27.00
$3.99
.$7.98

WOMEN'S
BOWLING LEAGUE
NOW FORMING
SIGN UP AT THE
MICHIGAN UNION
BOWLING LANES
OR CALL 662-4431 and
ask for bowling lanes

1

.r.w.

Pea Coats .. $25.00
Wool Air Force
Coats:...... $10.00

PINK CHABLIS of CALIFORNIA- Gallo Vineyards, Modesto, California.

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STATE STREET at North University

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Make a friend today:

HILLEL
YOM KIPPUR SERVICES
Oct. 5
REFORM, 1429 Hill ............ 7 p.m.
ORTHODOX, 1429 Hill.......6:30 p.m.
CONSERVATIVE,.
Mich. Union Ballroom........ 7 p.m.

1

Oct.6
0 a.m.
9 a.m.
9aQ.m.

#1d ocket Picture is
something to write home about.

with a TGQA(riei.
Scotty's golden pork tenderloin is fried just
the way you like it, then slipped under layers
of lettuce, tomato, and special tangy sauce .. .
and it's a great cure for burger boredom.
"Open wide," and get around a Scotty's tenderloin ... Ahhhh!
STILL ONLY 45
What you like...in sandwiches.

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AND
Buddy Guy
and Jr. Wells
saturday
Oct. 13,8pm

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Even on the back of.
9
daT /2
-7 k-

HILL AUD.
ler a a~m a o sf ~r(

I.

THE 15th ANNUAL

INTERNATIONAL

DINNER

PROGRAM

Friday, October 12th
-FRIENDLY PEOPLE, SINGING, GOOD FOOD

ADDRESS:

"THE POWERFUL, THE POOR
AND
S~x mncfrs tri h-r149rnm Crn'1s [:iC AGt TNthFr, -')i

Six models to choose from. Prices start at less than $21

I

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