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October 04, 1973 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1973-10-04

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Thursday, October 4, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Three

Thursday, October 4, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CHA PIN GAVE ORDERS:

Agent
W A S H I N G T O N (Reuter)
-Dwight Chapin, President Nix-
on's former appointment secre-
tary, instructed Republican un-
dercover agents to undermine
campaigns by contenders for the
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion last year, the Senate Water-
gate committee was told yester-
day.
Donald Segretti, a 32-year old
lawyer, disclosed the instructions
when he appeared before the
committee.
Segretti earlier this week
pleaded guilty to three minor
charges stemming from his in-
volvement in supervising the so-
called "dirty tricks" campaign
against Democrats during last
year's presidential election.
During the hearing, which was
interrupted briefly by telephoned
bomb threats, Segretti said he
had received detailed instruc-
tions from Chapin, a former col-
lege classmate, who recruited
him in 1971 to organize a nation-

admits
wide network of undercover ag-
ents. Segretti said he was even
given a White House book of
names to help recruit people to
work against the Democrats.
Segretti said Chapin gave him
general instructions to stir up so
much bitterness among Demo-
cratic contenders for the nomina-
tion that they would be unable to
rally. behind the party's eventual
candidate.
Segretti said the specific in-
structions included advice to
plant fake signs supporting Sen.
Edmund Muskie among anti-
Nixon demonstrators in an at-
tempt to link the Maine senator
with the demonstrators in press
photographs.
Segretti already has admitted
involvement in distributing let-
ters on Muskie's stationery false-
ly accusing Democratic Sena-
tors Henry Jackson and Hubert
Humphrey of sexual misbehavior.
The committee made public a

'di rty t
document Chapin sent Segretti in
November, 1971, urging renewed
efforts to make Muskie publicly
lose his famed temper.
Muskie later lost his position as
the front-running contender after
losing his temper during the New
Hampshire primary in early 1972.
But Segretti said he was order-
ed by Chapin to end his activities
in New Hampshire after he had
"blown his cover" by using his
real name at a meeting with New
Hampshire contacts.
Segretti said he told then-presi-
dential counsel John Dean III
about his activities last October
when the Washington Post was
preparing to publish a number of
details. After the story was pub-
lished, the White House dismiss-
ed comment on the allegations.
. Segretti said the original fed-
eral Watergate prosecutors asked
him no questions about how he
was paid when he appeared be-
fore the grand jury, although
they had discussed it briefly be-
forehand. A juror brought up the
question, Segretti said.
He corroborated testimony that
he was paid $45,000 in salary and
expenses, by Herbert Kalmbach,
Nixon's personal lawyer.
Segretti said as far as he knows
President Nixon was ignorant of
his activities, even though he

ricks
kept Chapin informed every step
of the way, as well as receiving
payment from Kalmbach.
Chapin, 32, who organized Pres-
ident Nixon's trips, including his
1972 China visit, has refused to
testify before the committee. He
pleaded the fifth amendment to
the Constitution, which allows a
person to avoid giving possibly
self-incriminating testimony.
LONDON (UPI) - Britain's
long-range radio station has
adopted procedures for keeping
in touch with all the ships at
sea. The government - owned
Post Office station at Burnham
on Sea, known to shippers as
Portishead Radio, now operations
calls to ships in the "North Pa-
cific" -- north of a line from
Callao, Peru, to Saigon - on a
fixed-time basis. The Pacific is
divided into five sectors, each of
which is assigned a fixed time
and new frequencies for making
radiotelephone calls or sending
radio telegrams, the post office
said.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, No. 25
Thursday, October 4, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign.
if
you
see
news
I happen
call
76-DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Thursday, October 4 Anthropology Mini -Course: J. Ruby,
DAY CALENDAR Temple U., "Jean Luc Goddard as An-
thropologist," Rackham Amph., 7 pm.
Physics Lecture: L. Radicati, Univ. Mu~sical Society: American Ballet Re-
of Pisa, "Degenerate Stars," 205 P-A pertory, R. nglund, choreographer,
Bldg., 2 pm. Power Ctr., 8 pm.
Pge~inrvLpfirt TitlhtyUT

AP Photo
DONALD SEGRETTI SMILES as he waits to testify before the Senate Watergate Committee yesterday
in Washington. Segretti testified that his activities during the 1972 Florida primary included distribution
of a phony letter on campaign stationery of Sen. Edmund Muskie that accused two other Democratic
presidential candidates of sexual misconduct.
Nxon urges Austrians to keep
transit center for Soviet Jews

. 0c na r rLecturer : . .ieireoa*n ,u.
of Ill.. "Somnolence, Activation, and
Sensory Control of Food Intake after
Lateral Hypothalmic Damage," 1057
Med. Sci., 3:45 pm.
Statistics Research Lab: "MIDAS Data
Manipulation & Program Control: II.
Aud. 3, MLB, 4 pm.; Aud. D, Angell
Hall. 7:30 pm.
Nuclear Seminar: A. Broad, "Coupled
Channels & Form Factor Effects in Di-
rect Reactions on Strongly Deformed
Nuclei," P-A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Medieval & Renaissance College: Cof-
fee Hour, Cook Rm., N. Entry, Law
Quad, 4 pm.'
Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures,
J. de Romilly, College de France, "The
Organization of Power," Angell Hall,.
And. A, 4:10 pm.

WAS H IN GT ON (Reuter)
President Nixon yesterday ap-
plied polite but firm pressure on
the Austrian government to
change its decision closing down
facilities for' the emigration of
Russian Jews through Austria.
Nixon, speaking a day after Is-
raeli Prime Minister Golda Meir
had failed in a personal attempt
to keep the facilities open, made
a direct appeal to Austrian Chan-
cellor Bruno Kreisky on humani-
tarian grounds, stressing how
Austria had received thousands
of refugees during the Hungarian
Revolution in 1956.
The President gave strong sup-
port to Mrs. Meir's plea to Krei-
sky in a meeting in Vienna, say-
ing he did not want to dictate to

the Austrian leader but hoped he
would reconsider his decision.
Kreisky, acceding to demands
by Arab terrorists, announced
last week that Schonau Castle,
the Jewish Agency's transit fa-
cility, would be closed although
individual Russian Jews could
still pass through Austria by the
shortest route and with the short-
est possible stop.
He took that course after two
Palestine terrorists, who boarded
a train carrying Jewish emi-
grants from Moscow to Vienna,
took four hostages - three Jews
and an Austrian customs guard
- and threatened to kill them
unless the transit center was
closed down.
The president, who also said

he would visit Europe within two
or three months and announced
that Secretary- of State Kissing-
er would make his sixth visit to
Peking later this month, declar-
ed: "We simply cannot have gov-
ernments, small or large, give in
to international blackmail by ter-
rorist groups."

-W
ATTENTION

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND
FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

A.
/ , J)'
'WI->y

Audiences are standing

Audiences are standing
up and applauding ...
WALKING
TALL
"Might just turn out to be
this year's sleeper and
emulate the runaway
success of 'BILLY JACK'."
--Kevin Thomas, L.A. Times

I

"BEST AMERICAN
MOVIE OF THE YEAR"
--Rolling Stone

I

STARTS FRIDAY
Program Information 434-1782
*P * " b
3020 Washtenaw
Between Ann Arbor
and Ypsilanti

William Welman's
The President Vanishes
A pacif st and upright President disappears on
the verge of a political upheaval by a group of
greedy Fascist capitalists. One of the first so-
cial protest films, it stars Arthur Byron, Paul
Kelly, Rosalind Russell and Edward Arnold.
SHORT: PLAYHOUSE
FRI.: Antonioni's L'AVVENTURA
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
/CIN EMA GU ILD Tonih at
and 9:95 Adm. $1
Tie University of Michigan
Professional Theatre Program
announces
3 Distinguished Repertory Companies
THE NEW PHOENIX
REPERTORY COMPANY
presenting cydeau's "wonderfuly fmuny farc"
October 25-27
TH E TVII
October 27 m286
the premiere engagement of
THE SHAWFESTIVAL
THEATRE OF CANADA
inGB. Sha ' swarm and w iltiv
*Io CLL
December 6 - 9
THE NEW YORK CITY
CENTER ACTING COMPANY
presentingIJohn Ga 's "songt illed satir"
February 1416
and Shakes'pare's comedy lof wr' se.nsutaity"

* NOW SHOWING! *
. . perhaps the most remarkable film to
emerge since Cecil B. DeMille founded
Hollywood." VERNON SCOTT, UPI

. f F'
'.':j
%i.
i .. j.
' 1/
t;
..w.
! j /i
iFj 6!/ ! f1

illusion and reality
FESTIVAL WEEKEND
Friday,Saturday, Sunday-Oct.5,6,7
MARILYN MONROE: a uniquely powerful
and uniquely ambivalent symbol, woman,
person of the American Fifties.
She lived and worked through the early
Sixties, but died with a phase of our culture
in the early years of the Kennedy Adminis-
tration and the cultural-political insurgence.
To some, she is "the epitome, the perfect
symbol of the spoiled white pampered wo-
man rolling in the bucks" (the last phrase
is not clearly a reference to money) "living
the decadent life-style and taking sleeping
pills."
To Norman Mailer, in his "controversial"
and genuinely problematic fictional-biog-
raphy, she is "fatherless child" whom "many
literary men are bound to adore . . . She
came to us in all her mother's doubt, and
leaves us in mystery."
To others, almost nothing about her is sim-
ple, nothing to be simplified or mystified by
men, categorized and neatly disposed.
This weekend, two mass-symbolic expres-
sions of the Fifties that no one is nostalgic
about: THE MISFITS. SOME LIKE IT HOT.
Marilyn Monroe. Illusion and reality. And
possibly for some, the dialectics of cultural
liberation.
a new morning presentation by the
friends of newsreel
$1.25 single admission; $2 double feature. All shows 7:15
& 9:30 p.m. in Modern Languages Auditoriums 3 and 4,
Washington at Thayer Streets: info: 769-7353

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You are invited to an informal showing of
William Barry Outerwear
in our J Shop for young men
Friday, October 5
Noon to 8:00 P.M.
Mr. Ben Fagenbush, representative
for William Barry, will present an
extensive collection of arctic parkas,
suedes, wools, nylon cir'e and sherpa
jackets outstanding in warmth, comfort,
styling and detailing. Sizes 36 to 46.
-r- ~ .

Universal Pictures and Robert Stigwood prvwnt
A NORMAN JEWISON Film
"JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR"

OPEN
DAILY
at 12:45
SHOWS
AT
1, 3, 5,
7&9p.m.

Staring
TED NEELEY& ARLANDERSON YVWONNE ELLIMAN
HlARRY FWNJNFN "s. ., vMewn FBrazand ,,Normain Jewiso~n

::
_ -, ; . .

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