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March 26, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-26

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Poge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday March 26. 197

Poge wo T E MIC IGAN DAL

V f 1 --l _.1 F , .

I

FAISAL'S DEATH:

\%

We are ending our unique,
no longer economically feas-
ible, 11 /2Year old, 25 %
new-book discount. We don't
enjoy doinqsthis, so we re
extendin it through March
31st to ive customers a
final opportunity to benefit
from it, and after that you
may wont a 15 % discount
club membership -- still a
better d e a I than anyone
else's -- and of course we
will match any other store's
prices anyway. This is a
chance to thank those who
have supported us, and to
beginninq of what we intend to
DAVID & STAFF

Local
(continued fromPage1)
old days we assumed that mili-
tary regimes wouldsbe right
wing, but now we're seeing that
that's less and less true," said
Singer.
International Politics Prof. A.
F. K. Organski called the as-
sassination "simply a human
trauma," adding, "It's cer-
tainly an uncomfortable mo-
ment for everyone, but ties be-
tween the U.S. and Saudi Arabia
aren't based specifically on the
existence of one moinarch."
"NOTHING much changes be-
cause of the death of one man.

experts split on impact,

Series on cancer
enlig thens women

. .....

We like to think that this one
person made a considerable dif-
ference, but he didn't," con-
tended Organski.
"Furthermore, I don't think
Saudi Arabia antagonism to-
wards the Israelis or their eco-
nomic policies towards selling
oil to the West will change," ne
added.
Political Science Prof. Cle-
ment Henry, while contending
that Khalid's policies "may re-
main the same as Faisal's" add-
ed, "Ithink the assassination
coould have extremely serious
consequences, especially since

Kissinger's talks
down."

have broken

ONLY 6 DAYS LEFT!I

HENRY predicted the new
regime might utilize the oil
weapon to apply pressure on
U.S. officials to "move again
towards settlement of their con-
flicts."
Henry also questioned the
choice of Khalid as Faisal's suc-
cessor, commenting, "The rew
king certainly doesn't have the
stature of the old king. Whether
Khalid will effectivelyoperate
in situations of power is in
doubt. I did not expect that he

1975 summer program of goddard college
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Social (C'ol()yv St1(lieS
June 2-August22 15 credits
An intensive 12 week program in
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economy, organic agriculture,
urban decentralization, the politics
of ecology, and the design and
construction of experimental
models for wind, solar, and
methane-powered energy
production.

Faisal's death shocks world

would take over," said Henry.
Henry stated that Fahd ap-
peared the more viable suc-
cessor.
MITCHELL described Khalid
as "hardly a raging dynamo,
but not as mentally limited as
s o m e observers h a v e sug-
gested."
"He isn't as bright as Fahd
however," said Mitchell, "which
is why Fahd was expected to
take over the regime."
Although Mitchell rejects the
idea of any military coup in the
king's assassination, both Henry
and Organski lend credance to
the possibility. Henry further
suggests that the assassination
may be the resultof" a palace
coup.
"IT COULD be almost any-
thing," said Henry.
Organski explained that if
there was an underlying coup
operation "the Saudis would
probably cover it up."
"All we know right now is
what Saudi Arabia will tell us,"
said Organski. "Any additional
information w i 11 presumably
have to be dug out by U.S. re-
porters."

FewBy PAM YOUNG
Few women know about the
detection, prevention and treat-
ment of one of today's deadliest
diseases-cancer.
In an effort to break down the
information gap the Commission
for Women (CFW), Women's
Program Coordinator and the
local chapter of the American
Cancer Society are sponsoring a
three day cancer education
series that opened yesterday.
"THIS IS not a detection or
treatment clinic," B a r b a r a
Murphy, assistant chairwoman
for CFW emphasized. She add-
ed, "We are sponsoring an in-
formation center to make
women aware of what can be
done if the disease is caught
early."
The more than 150 people who'
visited the opening display yes-
terday favorably reviewed pam-
phlets on lung, mouth, breast
and uterine cancer. Beth Bar-
ber praised the effort, saying,
"This is excellent-if people
take advantage of it. If they
don't understand the information
they should go to their doctor
and he will explain it."
Ms. Ernest Brater, an Ameri-

! can Cancer Society volunteer
who had breast cancer, is work-
ing at the series to emphasize
the importance of an annual
check-up and a breast examina-
tion for women. "Ninety-five per
cent of the breast 'cancer cases
are found by -the woman her-
self through self-examination,"
she said.
BRATER, declared, "If this
clinic can get one person to the
doctor on time then it won't be
in vain."
Breast cancer killed nearly
33,000 American women in 1973.
The American Cancer Society
urges women to examine their
breasts monthly in order to
catch any traces of the disease
early.
Jane Schenden lauded yes-
terday's films for their thorough-
ness and suggested the series
he held again next year. Tracy
Stewart agreed, "It can't hurt
to have this every year if it
benefits people."
The series continues today
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the
Boulevard Rm.. of the North
Campus Commons. Tomorrow
the presentation will be held n
the Towsley Center, Rm. 2315,
from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

/

Goodard is located in a rural
Vermont community, rich in both
natural and human resources, in a
state noted for Its progressive
environmental legislation.
The summer program is directed by
MURRAY BOOKCIN, author of Post
Scarcity Anarchism, Our Synthetic
Environment, and Limits of the
City. Visiting Faculty will include
outstanding national experts in the
fields of alternate technology and
communities such as KARL HESS,
Community Technologies, SAM
LOVE, Environmental Action,
JOHN and NANCY TODD, founders
New Alchemy Institute, WILSON
CLARK, author of Energy for
Survival. STEVE BAER,
Zomeworks, JOHNI
SHUTTLEWORTH, publisher of
Mother Earth News, ROBERT
REINES, Integrated Life SupportI
Systems Labs, and STEWART -
BRAND, publisher of The Whole t
Earth Catalog. I

4//fl

(Continued from Page 1)
close relations between Saudi1
Arabia and the United States,"
the statement said.
Although convinced of the
friendship of the new regime,
U. S. officials said the death
could not have come at a worse
time because of the tottering
THIS WEEK
ONLY!
"A JOY! NEIL SIMON'S
BEST PLAY YET."
- Clive Samoes, N.Y. Times
EDDIE ARNY
BRACKEN FREEMAN
NEW COMEDY
Professional Theatre Program
MARCH 28-30, 1975
POWER CENTER
Eves, at 8 p.m.;
Sun. Mat, at 3 p.m.
Advance ticket sales & in-
formation: PTP ticket office,
Mendelssohn lobby, (313)
764-0450. T i c k e t s also
avoilable at Hudson's Briar-
wood.

condition of American foreign
policy in the Middle East.
KISSINGER suffered a major
setback last week with the col-
lapse of his personal diplomacy
aimed at arranging a Middle
East peace.
The instability introduced by
that failure could easily be
worsened because of Faisal's
assassination, one ranking
State Department source said,
Pentagon officials said they
regard the new leadership in
Saudi Arabia as pro-United
States and expect little, if any,
change in more than $1.6 billion
in recent arms sales to the
country.
THEY ALSO said they are not
worried about the safety of
some 1250 U.S. military ad-
visers, contractors, technicians,
and civilian employes of the
Defense Department now in
Saudi Arabia.
In Jerusalem, Gen. Haim
Herzog, Israel's ambassador-
designate to the United Nations,
said "it may be that the new
regime could open the door to
Soviet penetration" in Saudi
Arabia and "does open up pos-
sibilities for a widening of the
major power confrontation in

this area."
But another Israeli govern-
ment official said "We don't
know enough about the motives
behind his killing," to forecast
what may happen.
THE RADIO quoted a palace
spokesperson as saying: "In-
vestigation established the as-
sassin acted alone, and no one
else is behind the crime."
The account gave no hint as
to the fate of the assassin. Fais-
al was known to have had
Bedouin bodyguards who nor-
mally carried submachine guns
and daggers in golden scab-
bards.
Saudi Arabia lives by the
strict Islamic code called Sha-
ra, which requires the behead-
ing of murderers.
WHILE KING Faisal had
been critical of what he thought
was blind support for Israel,
U.S. officials lately credited him
with giving major support to
Kissinger's last peace efforts.
"All of these elements could
be affected by Faisal's deathl
and could lead to what Kissing-
er fears most, and that's in-
stability caused by uncertainty,"
one State Department official
said.
One of the first signs that this
instabiilty is having an effect
came when the American dollar
fell in value overseas and the
price of oil company stocks
dropped momentarily on some
stock markets.
FAISAL HAD led the 1973 oil
embargo and was a major fac-
tor in the dramatic rise in the
price of petroleum.
However, in recent months
his government had moderated
this course and was being
counted on jn Washington to
convince other Arab oil pro-
ducers to hold the line against
new increases in the cost of 'ril.
Now, some government eco-
nomists said, the whole situa-
tion is up in the air and "no-
body is certain that the new
(Continued on Page 8)

Insurgents shell Da Nang

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illustrated brochure
write:
D. Chodorkoff
Social Ecology Program
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Plainfield, Vermont 05667

K

(Continued from Page 1)
complexes in the country.
THE UNITED States is al-
ready financing an emergency
airlift of food, ammunition and
oil to Phnom Penh, the besieged
capital of neighboring Cambo-
dia.
A State Department spokes-
person said in Washington there
will be a sealift from Da Nang
as well. He estimated there may
be 200 to 250 Americans still in
Da Nang, South Vietnam's sec-
ond largest city.
Washington officials said ne-
gotiations are under way with
World Airways of Oakland,
Calif., for the use of a Boeing
727 transport plane. It was un-
derstood discussions were also
under way with Flying Tiger
Line for the use of a Boeing 747
jumbo jet.
CAM RANH BAY is only a
30-minute flight from Da Nang,
and a jumbo jet could carry up
to 1,000 Vietnamese i efugees per
flight. Diplomattc sources said
U.S. aid already allocated for
South Vietnam w ,uld pay for
the airlift.
In other major In iachina de-
velopments.
-President Nguyen Van Thieu
ordered a cabinet reshuffle and
invited "qualified anti-commun-
ist nationalists" to join. Radio
Saigon said Thieu told Prime

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Minister Tran Thien Khiem to
transform the cabinet. "into a
fighting government" to grapple
with a formidable Communist
offensive that has forced Saigon
to abandon 11 of its 44 pro-
vinces.
-In Cambodia, government
infantry and armor battalions
backed by boruber; launched 3
drive on the Communist-led
rebels' "rocket belt" threatening
the Phnom Penh airport, but
the operation stalled under in-
tense fire. Observers said it was
essential for the government to
eliminate the rocket belt before
the Khmer Rouge rebels move
captured U.S.-made 105mm how-
itzers within range of the air-
field and use the accurate guns
to stop the U.S. airlift.
Diplomatic sources said Da
Nang was weakly defended and
vulnerable after the surrender
of Hue to the north and the ftill
of two provinces to the south.
Government troops were out-
mimbered two to one by North
Vietnamese divisions and tanks
in the area, they said.
ASSOCIATED Press Special
Correspondent Peter Arnett re-
ported from Da Nang, 350 miles.
north of Saigon, that the city
was gripped by fear and a sense
of hopelessness as the North
Vietnamese noose tightened'
hoer by hour.
The city's normal population
of 500,000 has been swelled to,
between one and 1 million hN
refugees from the Communist
offensive and more w e r e
streaming in.
Arnett said it had been hoped!
that troops retreating from Hue,a
50 miles to the north, would help
with the defense of Da Nang.
But many of the soldiers ar-
rived in Da Nang without boots
and without weapons and just
merged into the masses of ref-c
ugees.

REFUGEES re a c h ing Da
Nang said tens of thousands of
Vietnamese soldiers and civil-
ians were frantically' fleeing
Hue, 50 miles northwest of Da
Nang, after the government an-
nounced it was abandoning the
old imperial city.
The refugees said swarms of
fleeing p e o p 1 e crowded the
Thuan An Beach 10 miles from
Hue waiting for ships to take
them to safety in a scene rem-
iniscent of the British evacua-
tion of Dunkerque. They 'said
soliders were throwing away
boots, pants and weapons and
wading toward navy and civilian
vessels standing off the ,beach.
Reports said troops retreating
from Hue and from the fallen
provincial ,capital of Quang Ngai
included members' of two divi-
sions once regarded as among
South Vietnam's best, the 1st
and the 2nd.
SOUTH OF Da Nang, AP cor-
respondent Peter Q'Loughlin re-
ported that the battered convoy
of tired and hungry refugees
from the abandoned central
highland cities of Pleiku and
Kontum. crawled to -within six
miles of the coastal city of.Tuy
Hoa and safety, but stalled un-
der a sapper attack' by North
Vietnamese and ins u r g e n t
troops.
The attack sent black smoke
billowing from a i ember of ve-
hicles, and government ,helicop-
ters poured rocket and Gatling
machine-gun fire on the nsur-
rent position in support of some
1.000 rangers called in "o open
the road.
The refugee column of 4,000
vehicles and as many as 100,000
people has been blocked almost
within sight of Tuy Hoa for six
days by Communist-led em-
bushes.

DON'T JUST COMPLAIN
MAKE SOME NOISE ON . .

i

UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES
POSITION OPENINGS ARE ON:
STUDENT RELATIONS
CIVIL LIBERTIES BOARD
ENERGY CONSERVATION TASK FORCE
U. OF M. CABLE STEERING COMMITTEE
TEACHER AWARDS
-ALSO-
PROGRAM EVALUATION

FALL '75

I

_ _j .-
__ _ _
I ' .

universkly towers
APARTMENTS
South University at Forest Ave.
ON CAMPUS
walk to everything-no car or parking expenses necessary
,;::r;A'"' 2 blocks from the Diag
=F 'Ak:: * 8 month lease
". Air-Conditioned
Fully Carpeted
;"Piano and Recreation Room
}:Laundry Facilities
'' .z Study Room
f "Heated Swimming Pool
h 24 Hour Maintenance
s and Security
luxurious Lobby

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Interviews for all these committees will be
Tues. and Wed. (April 1 and 2).
Stop by the SGC offices, third floor of the Union, to siqn
up for an interview and pick up an application form.
Additional information is available.

We can help you

help the environment.
Our Drug Department carries a wide
range of recycled non-aerosol products:
" Dial Roll-on antiperspirant
" Arrid Roll-on & cream
" Mitchum Roll-on & cream
" Old Speke deodorant stick & powder
" Queen Helene Mint Julep deodorant stick
" Recycled: Pom 2-ply toilet tissue

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yearbook time

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