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March 26, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-26

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Wednesday, March 26, 1975THMIHGNALYPgThe

New Saudi.
kingchosen
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (JP)-The new king of Saudi Arabia,
Khaled Ibn Abdul Aziz, was once described by a foreign diplomat
as "probably the nicest man in the kingdom." But he hadn't
been expected to become king.
The 62-year-old crown prince was proclaimed king of this oil-
wealthy land yesterday after the assassination of his older
brother, Kng Faisal. The next younger brother, Prince Fahd,
the new crown prince, had usually been given more important
assignments by Faisal and had been widely expected to ascend
the throne.
IN SAUDI ARABIA, however, there is deep respect for age,
and Khaled is the oldest survivor among the 40 sons of the
legendary King Ibn Saud.
Khaled underwent open heart surgery at a Cleveland, Ohio,
clinic several years ago. His main interests are said to be hunting
with falcons and camel racing.
Though he had been deputy premier under Faisal, his views
on the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil and relations with the United
States are largely unknown.
FAISAL had been expected to play a major role in picking
his successor, and it' was not known whether he had passed the
word sometime before his death.
The Saudi king is officially chosen by a mysterious council
known as "Those Who Tie and Unite." It is made up of influential
princes, religious, tribal and governmental leaders. .
By contrast to the sedate Khaled, S3-year-old Prince Fahd is
known as a man who likes to gamble and womanize on foreign
trips. He is also considered an honest and intelligent statesman.
WOMANIZING is tolerated in the strict Moslem world of Saudi
Arabia, but the Koran says gambling is "the work of the devil."'
The gambling was thought to have hurt Fahd with Faisal.
King Rhaled will be surrounded by his brothers and nephews
as he sets out to rule, for the family holds most of the important
"he amilypst functions very much as a political family,''
foreigners have commented.
THE MAN-in fact, the men-who succeed the slain autocrat
are known to have faithfully reflected his views, notably with
respect to relations with the Arab world, the oil nations and the
United States. The ailing Khaled Ibn Abdul Aziz, Faisal's succes-
sor, and the new crown prince who likely will shoulder much of
the burden, are widely traveled men. Crown Prince Fahd is said
to know is way around the intricate world of oil and Arab
politics.
What seems most important is the strength of personality of
King Khaled and Crown Prince Fahd as this affects the domestic
scene. Th1ere is some ferment in Saudi Arabia from the sudden
erormous influx of oil wealth and an inability to absorb it
quickly enough to meet rising expectations, all of which can have
political backlash.
There could be a problem here. Khaled is reputed to be a
weak personality, disinterested In governing. However, he is also
an ill man and in any case it seems most likely most of the
governing will be done by Fahd. Americans who know him regard
Fahd as eminently responsible on the political and economic
scne
Other areas where the assassination generates much anxiety
are: the Middle East peace effort, the general power picture of
the Persian Gulf and the impact on the Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries, the OPEC. That cartel is now nearing some-
thing of an jnternal crisis.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Faisal's rise from obscurity
to fame, power and influence

T{IYADH, Saudi Arabia, (Reu-
ter)-In his lifetime, King Fai-
sal of Saudi -Arabia spanned the
Western world's image of the
T Arab in this century. Born the
son of an obscure desert sheikh
in 1906 and living in the auster-
ity of his bedouin background,
Faisal rose to control the fate
and fortune of western industry.
Before he was 70, Faisal Ibn
Abdul Aziz Al-Saud - his name
mneans "sword" in Arabic --
wielded influence far beyond the
Arabian peninsula.
AS KEEPER of Islam's two
holy cities, Mecca and Medina,
he was a major spiritual figure
for the world's 500 million Mos-
lems.
As keeper of Saudi Arabia's
millions of barrels of oil, his in-
fluence touched nearly every
human being - from the in-
dustrialists and their workers
in Europe and the United States
to the ctizens of the developing
A devout Moslem, Faisal
AP Photo learned to live and rule in pov-
KING FAISAL of Saudi Arabia is shown here with former President Richard Nixon during erty as the laws of Islam and
a visit to the United States last year. Faisal was assassinated early yesterday by a nephew. them ticommanded, through a
__________- ----sonal autocracy.

like father, Abdul Aziz, popu-!i
larly known as Ibn Saud, storm-
ed back at the head of his war-
riors to regain his kingship.
After Faisal took power, he l
was criticized as a reactionary
and an "American stooge" by
the more militant Arab States.
It was the Arab defeat in the
1967 Six-Day War against Israel
and the humilitation of Egypt's
late President Gamal Abdel
Nasser that speeded up Fais-
al's pace and stemmed much of
the criticism.
helped underwrite Egypt's econ-
omy and renewed war effort.
From arch-reactionary, King'
Faisal suddenly' became a re-
spected paymaster of the new
Arab struggle.
During the October, 1973,
Arab - Israeli War, he used his
vast oil resources as a potent
political weapon against Israel.'
BUT after the 1973 war he
played a leading role in the
search for a MiddleeEas apeace
State Henry Kissinger invaria-
bly consulted him during the
negotiation of complicated

agreements to disengage Egyp-
tian, Syrian and Israeli troops
locked along the former battle
lines when the fighting ended.
Faisal had eight sons and six
daughters by four wives, two of
whom he divorced many years
ago. Another died.
He and his remaining wife,
Iffat, of Turkish origin, were
married for nearly 40 years.
OrderpIO
ourY

LT. GOY. CLEAR

ED:

Dammcin s integrity
LANSING (UPI) - Lt. Gov. MILLIKEN said that he would tions of the newspaper series-
James Damman has emerged have no qualms choosing Dam- a fact that Milliken acknowl-
from an attorney general's in- man as a runningmate with the edged yesterday.
vestigation thatasabsolved hi knowledge hemmnw po~ssesses But, esi,"hsrve t
man, an able man and a man tivities. my request by the attorney
of integrity," Gov. William Milliken said that both he and' general has of course made it
Milliken said yesterday. Damman agree in retrospect very clear that Damman did
Milliken issued the strong that Damman's partnership in not engage in any unlawful or
statement of support for Dam- a land investment firm while illegal activity. This is a very
man just a day after Attorney he was a member of the Troy impratfco n ey
General F r a n k Kelley City Commission should not important faori ndt vr
cleared the lieutenant governor have kept secret from the pub- ipraton.
of any criminal wrongdoing in lic. ' I intend to work very closely
his outside business activities While the probe turned up no' with Damman in the future and
while a Troy City official in the criminal violations, it did jI intend to support Damman in
late 1960s. substantiate the basic allega- the future."

AT THE same time, his faith
made him both Anti-Zionist and
Anti-Communist to a level
where he scarcely distinguish-
dbWen he was born, oil had
not yet been discovered in Ara-
bia, and indeed the Saudi King-
panses of the Arabian Penin-
sula and in sophisticated cen-
tral Europe.
The Saud Dynasty's hold on
the territorytr waso pearious,
pushed the family into what is
now Kuwait.

JERRY GROSS Presenis JEAN-PAUL BELMOND

THEN in 1901, Faisal's war- in ALAIN RESNAIS' il4
DR. PAUL USLAN SA IK
Optometrist CAUGHT IN A WORLD WHERE
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Wednesday, Marek 26
Day Calendur
Commission for Women: Women's
Advocate: Cancer' Information Dlays
for Women, N. Campus Commons,
potte owe, &the Consumer,
CCS:.7. Holland, "Machines That
Learn," 2050 Frieze Bldg., 10 am.
mel Profitl Sceuln ofa Corn-
Resurce clogy: Stephen Bur-
gess, "Marine Mammal Subsistence
Hunting onSt. Lawrence Island,
Alaska," 1040 N 5, noon.
CAAS Colloquium: Richard A. En-
glish, "Black Families in 19th Cen-
tury Michigan: Research in Pro-
gress," CAAS, 1100 S. Univ., 12:10
Surrealism Colloquium: "Surreal-
ism in Literature," panel, Rackham
Amph., 4 pm.
Physics: P.G,!!. Sanders, Oxford
Wednesday, March 26, 1975
at the University of Mchigan New
phone 764-05f62. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 45106
Published d a i i y Tuesday throab
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U., "Weak Neutral Currents and
Possible Parity Violating Effects La
Laser Light Concert,"Power, 6, 8,
10 pm.
Pesimists and the Happy Pejarist,"
Electrical, Computer Engineering:
Wi.Rsenberg, chmnMIh Pubic
SPoer System Plann ig," 170 P&A,
8 pm.
PTP: GordOne's No Place to Be
somebody, Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
Music School: String dept. presen-
tation, Recital Hall, 8 pm.

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UNIVERSITY THEATRE
SHOWCASE
The PULITZER PRIZE PLAY
by CRRLF CORDONE
Guest Director,
JULf US LEE
MARCH 26-29, 1975
8:00 p.m.
Mendelssohn Theotie
Tickets available at the Uni-
versity Theatre Programs
ticket office in the Mendel-
ssohn Lobby, (313) 764-
0450 Tickets may also be
purchased at Hudson's Briar-
wood.

1~ZHE
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