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March 19, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-03-19

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Wednesday, March 19, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three I

Wednesday, March 19, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Thieu orders troops,
from Da Nang to
help defend Saigon

Supreme Court kills
Tenn. ban on' Hair'

SAIGON, South Vietnam (AP -
President Nguyen Van Thieu
ordered a paratrooper division
from Da Nang back to Saigon
yesterday to help cope with
mounting Communist-led drives
in surrounding provinces.
The Saigon command said
North Vietnamese forces, in the
second week of a broad offen-
sive, were pressing against two
district capitals within 50 miles
of Saigon and had cut all ma-
jor highways except Route 4 to
the Mekong Delta.
IN THE central highlands,
thousands of refugees fled to-
ward the coast in the wake of
Thieu's decision to abandon
three highlands provinces with-
out a fight.
The government decision to
retreat from Kontum, Pleiku
and Darlac provinces in the cen-
tral highlands came after the
North Vietnamese captured Ban
Me Thuot, capital of Darla.,
isolated the other two provincial
capitals and reportedly began a
massive buildup.
Large areas of the provinces,
with a total population of more
than half a million, were under
Communist control before they
were formally abandoned. The
main government strongholds
were the provincial capitals,
and these could be supplied only
by air.
SAID AN American official:
"It was a question of which is
best: getting chewed up because
you can't move troops and sup-
plies rapidly enough or moving
into a defensive posture that is
significantly more defensible."
Eleven American civilians
heading for work at Bien Hoa,
15 miles northeast of Saigon,
were slightly injured when a
boy on a motorbike hurled a can
filled with explosives into a bus.
The men are employed by Lear
Siegler Inc. of Oklahoma City,
an aircraft maintenance firm
working for South Vietnam.
The terrorist escaped.
In other Indochina develop-
ments:
-Cambodian troops continued
a drive against the Communist-

led insurgents' "rocket belt"
northwest of Phnom Penh and
recaptured one position, mili-
tary sources said. Fierce fight-
ing was reported on the east
bank of the Mekong River
across from Phnom Penh where
government gunboats duelled at
point-blank range with rebels
dug in along the riverbank.
-Ceremonies marking the
fifth anniversary of the 1970
coup which overthrew Prince
Norodom Sihanouk and brought
President Lon Nol to power
were canceled without explana-
tion. From Peking, Sihanouk
declared "I remain the only
legal head of state in Cambo-
dia."
-Rep. William Broomfield of
Michigan, the ranking Republi-
can on the House Foreign Af-
fairs committe, said in Washing-
ton that President Ford's un-
willingness to accept a June 30
cutoff of military aid to Cam-
bodia will prevent that aid from
being approved. Ford had orig-
inally requested $222 million in
extra aid to Cambodia, but
Broomfield said the committee
was considering a compromise
providing $82.5 million in aid
with a June 30 cutoff.
-Senate Minority Leader
Hugh Scott said Democrats in
Congress have virtually aban-
doned Cambodia but "the Presi-
dent hasn't done it." Scott nmade
the comment after a meeting
with Ford.
-Thailand's foreign minister
said his country's plans to seek
diplomatic relations with China
are based on the desire for a
balance of power in light of
America's waning influence in
Asia. Chartichai Choonhavan
said he believed U. S. military
disengagement in Asia had left
a vacuum into which China, the
Soviet Union and Japan will cer-
tainly move.
The Saigon command report-
ed street fighting in Dinh Quan,
a district capital 50 miles north-
east of the capital, after a heavy
North Vietnamese assault led
by tanks.

WASHINGTON () - Stage
production won substantially the
same constitutional protection
from prior censorship as books
and movies, under a Supreme
Court ruling yesterday.
The court struck down a ban
against performance of the rock
musical "Hair" in a Chatta-
nooga, Tenn., municipal thea-
tre.
THE COURT did not rule on
whether "Hair" is obscene, but
said the procedure by which it
was banned fell short of con-
stitutional standards.
The five justices who signed
the majority opinion went on to
lay down the same standard
they have previously prescribed
for films and print - essential-
ly that a court must determine
obscenity before a work can be

suppressed.
The U. S. 6th Circuit Court of
Appeals in Cincinnati had up-
held a federal judge's decision
that group nudity and simulated
sex in the performance of
"Hair" were not entitled to con-
stitutional freedom of speech
protections.
In other action, the court:
-Held that 35 states which
refuse to count conceived but
unborn children in computing
welfare grants may continue to
do so.
-Ruled 6 to 2 that aliens who
fail to present themselves for
inspection when they enter the
United States may be deported
even though they became par-
ents while in the country.

"NEIL SIMON'S BEST PLAY YET. A JOY. A I

LOVELY PLAY, EXTRAORDINARILY FUN-
NY."-Clive Barnes, N.Y. Times

i

AP Photo

EDDIE
BRACKEN

ARNY
FREEMAN

Onassis funeral

C
ai
be
tli
do
thi
te
w

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, flanked by her son John and her d aughter Caroline, and accompanied by her brother in law Sen.
Edward Kennedy, arrives on he island of Scorpios yesterday for the funeral of her multi-millionaire husband, Aristotle Onassis.
IJTOFF DATE DISPUTED: THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 133
Wednesday, March 19, 1975
Is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
pasidat AArbor,.Michigan 48106.
Published d a i I y Tuesday throughI
Sunday morning during the tiniver-
WASHINGTON {P) - Military I million in additional assistance compromise to the House floor sity year at 42 Maynard Street, Ann
d for Cambodia appeared to I for Cambodia for the remainder and to fight the cutoff there, al- Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
e stuck yesterday on the ques- of this fiscal year, but that has though he added that Ford said rates: $10 by carrier Icamipus area);
on of a cutoff date, with Fresi- run into mounting congressional he would consult further with $12 non-local maill (other states and
ent Ford refusing to agree to opposition. his aides. foreign).
ie cutoff and a House commit- The House Foreign Affairs "I think the principal troruble summer session publ shed Tues-
e declining to approve aid Committee has been consider- is it's tying his hand and tak- Scampus area): $6.00 bcal mai
ithout it. ing a compromise plan which ing away his flexibility in con- (Michigan and Ohio): $6.50 non-
would provide $82.5 million in'ducting foreign policy, ,Broooi- local mail (other states and foreign
BUT FORD has not given up .i day through Saturday morning.

N~~ON3

61/

r Nta

MARCH 28-29, 1975 POWER CENTER
(Eves. 8:00 o.m., Sun. Mat. 3:00 p.m.)
U-M PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Advance Ticket Sales-PTP Box Office
in the Mendelssohn Lobby, 764-0450

on his request for the aid, Sen-
ate Minority Leader Hugh Scott
said yesterday, even though
'compassion has taken second
place to expediency," in Con-
gress.
Originally Ford asked for $222

"

Gandhi denies legal charge of
fraud in 4-year-old election

aid, but would in lude a une
30 cutoff date for all military
assistance to Cambodia. SEN. JOHN Tower (R-Tcx.)
said after the meeting that he
FORD'S advisers indicated believes Ford will accept the
Monday that they would agree compromise "in preference to'
to such a cutoff, but only for nothing."
the purpose of getting the mea- "The President is very con-
sure to the floor of the full cerned about the deterioration
House, where they could fight to of American credibility in the
get the cutoff deleted. free world," Tower said.
Rep. William Broomfield of He said that in the meeting
Michigan, ranking Republican Ford made no conclusive com-
on the comnttee, said yestr r- ment on what course he would
day that w.'brcnt Ford's 'igmte- take, but in the meeting the
Iment to the --toff, the ;rotes will President was told in effec:
not be the "e to get the aid out
of the committee. "THIS IS the best you can
"I think i is doubtfuil' that get - if you can get that. This
either the ccmmittee or th ;full is a take it or leave it propo-
House will approve military aid sition and even this has linmited
for Cambodia. said Broonfie.d. chances for success."
He indicated doubts that the
House wil ,r'ove the aid even There is no great urgency, he
if Ford agrees to the cuof. added, noting the announcement
by the State Department Mon-

HEWLETT PACKARD

Jacobson's Open Thursday and Friday Evenings Until 9:00 P.M.
Saturday Until 5:30 P.M.

NW DELHI, India UP) -
Prime Minister Indira Ghandi
sat in the dock of an Indian
court yesterday and declared
herself innocent of charges that
she illegally won her seat in
Parliament.
With her political future rid-
ing bn the verdict, the 57-year-
old prime minister underwent a
four-hour cross-examination in
a heavily guarded courtroom in
her home city of Allababad in
northern India.
THE FIRST prime minister
since independence in 1947 to
appear in court, Gandhi vehe-
mently denied any wrongdoing
in the last parliamentary elec-
tions four years ago.
If convicted, she could lose
her parliamentary seat - and
the prime ministership - and
be banned from running for of-
fice for six years.
The charges were brought by
Raj Narain, a Socialist whom
Gandhi defeated in her parlia-
mentary constituency by a lop-
sided margin of 183,000 to 71,000
votes:
NARAIN filed his suit soon
after the February 1971 elec-
tion,' charging that the prime
minister misused official ma-

chinery and at least one senior
civil servant to help her achieve
victory, spent excessively on her
campaign and wrongfully used
religious appeals to gain votes
from the majority Hindu com-
munity.
Gandhi's appearance in court
followed unsuccessful attempts
by her lawyers to get Narain's
suit dismissed and then to have
the prime minister avoid tes-
tifying in open court.
Dressed inja printed pink sari,
Gandhi walked into the court-
room at 10 a.m. and took an
oath pledging to tell the truth.
"IT IS wrong to say that I
do not believe in fairness," she
testified at one stage. "On the
contrary, having been trained
by independence leader Mahat-
ma Gandhi and my father Ja-
waharlal Nehru, I do not be-
lieve in unfair means."
Gandhi is expected to finish
her testimony today, but there
was no indication how long the
hearing would last. Judge Jag-
moban Lal Sinha is a one-man
tribunal in the case.
Gandhi has at least 10 defen-
sive lawyers, including N. A.
Palkhivala, a critic of her gov-
ernment who is considered In-
dia's leading constitutional ex-

pert. Authoritative sources said'
he helped to prepare her defense
although he will not appear in
court.
POLITICAL observers believe
Gandhi's main task is to prove
that Yashpal Kapoor, formerly
a senior assistant in her secre-
tariat, did not campaign on her
behalf until he resigned from
the government.
Under an Indian law similar
to the Hatch Act in the United
States, it is illegal for federal
employes to take part in poli-
tics. Gandhi contends that Ka-
poor resigned before he became
one of her campaign workeri.
Hundreds of police guarded
the court building. They arrest-
ed the editor of an Allababad
newspaper when a metal detec-
tor revealed he was carrying a
pistol with three bullets. The
editor said h carried the wea-
pon because of a family feud.
The incident touched off an up-
roar in the Parliament in New
Delhi, with members demand-
ing that steps be taken to ensure
the prime minister's safety.

CALCULATORS
and
ACCESSORIES

I

at

"I TOLD him (Ford) that in
my judgment we are at an im-
passe unless he could agree to
the provisions embodied in our
compromise, including the cut-
off of all U. S. military aid June
30. He told me he could not do
that," Broomfield said after a
congressional leadership meet-
ing with the President.
But Broomfield said Ford told
them he still hopes to get the

day that the Defense Depart-
ment had found an additional
$21.5 million worth of ammuni-
tion that can be sent to Cam-
bodia without Congressional ap-
provaL
That money was left over
from last year, according to a
Pentagon spokesman, a n d
should provide enough ammuni-
tion to keep Cambodia going "at
least a couple of weeks" longer.

JacobomnS

PLEASE PARK IN THE ADJOINING ENCLOSED MAYNARD STREET AUTO RAMP.
JACOBSON'S WILL GLADLY VALIDATE YOUR PARKING TICKET.

1.

l

JOHN FORD WESTERNS 1950
RIO GRANDE
(AT 7)
John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara are hardly at peace on
the plains as Ford unveils his vision of the West as an
American mytholocly.
WAGON MASTE R
(AT 9:05) 1950
Ben Johnson (ist seen in THE LAST PICTURE SHOW)
battles Iniuns, outlaws and the Wild West as he quides a
Mormon caravan throuch John Ford country to the promised
land.
THURS.: Borqman's THE SEVENTH SEAL
CINEMA GUILD BOT HOWS AUD
FR$1.50S ARCH. AUD

Jacobson'st

Open Thursday and Friday Evenings Until 9:00 P.M.
Saturday Until 5:30 P.M.

I

PUT YOUR LEGAL
KNOWLEDGE TO WORK
. HELP REORGANIZE THE STUDENT
LEGAL ADVOCATE PROGRAM
Interested? Drop by the SGC offices, 3rd floor
Michigan Union, to sign up for an interview on
Friday, March 21, and pick up an application.
More information isyavailable.

A GOOD PLACE
to relax
BILLIARDS
at the UNION
Open 11 a.m.

C- '

e

U"

I

IN, I

m m m ovjll,

WHERE ARE YOU?

S. D. AI-Rohaily
Rochelle Adams
Terry Adams
A. Ahmadiiam
Lynn Anderson
Beverly Barnes
Becky Brunninq
Kathy Burke
Adil Bushnak
Thomas Cheoko
Sirius Cuyler
Alan DiGoetano
Claudia Doudney
Ed Einowski
Margaret Hallock
Jean Hamilton
Don Hubble
Cleo Hubler

Lawrence Koal
Paula Koeplin
Kathryn Lanniqan
Debbie Lashey
Charles Levine
Pam Loewe
Brian Mallon
Joseph Maxev
Craio Mellinqer
Jeffrey Morrison
A. Muavqil
Brian Mulikoff
Sue Murphy
Pam Ovshinsky
Kile Powers
Auqusta Pruitt
Nicholas Scheid
Sue Souchock

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