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February 27, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-27

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Thursday, February 27, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

'U' Turns
Here's sweat in your eye
He is constantly exposed to the crackling sounds of snap-]
ping, wringing-wet towels, to the smell of the sweat from trim
athletic bodies (and some not so trim), and to the pre- and post-1
competition locker room jive. He works in a small room from1
8:15 to 4:15, with only a lunchbreak (and he wishes to remain
anonymous).
He is the man behind the counter in the towel room of Wat-
erman Gym, and he says his job is hell.
"The low pay," he remarks, "doesn't compensate for the
loneliness and frustration of this job, and the time I put intof
it." He intends to quit as soon as he gets a job offer more to his
liking.
"Four or five people have had this job since January 1974,"
he notes. "I've been here myself for eight months."
He may hold a new olfactory endurance record.
-LARRY GARON
CRISP at last!
Bid adieu to the long registration lines weaving their way
through Waterman Gym and say farewell to the horrid hassle
of conjuring up a class schedule 'cause CRISP has arrived! Due
to increasing student demands for easier registration and Uni-
versity department desires for more information on course
signups, the Computer Registration Involving Student Partici-
pation (CRISP) will replace the archaic Waterman-way beginning
in April.
With CRISP, students need only go to one location, Room
215 of the old Architecture and Design building, to complete all
their registration for the upcoming term. In most cases, CRISP
will take a mere four to five minutes to process one registra-
tion and can accommodate in the neighborhood of 1,500 students
each day.
The appearance of CRISP in Ann Arbor will put the Uni-
versity among "perhaps a half dozen major universities with
enrollments over 15,000" using the computer program, stated
Douglas Woolley, University associate registrar.
Successfully tested on a limited basis last term, CRISP
eliminates much of the running around and pent-up anger asso-
ciated with registration. Student ID's and registration forms
will first be checked at the door for accuracy. Students then
proceed to the computer terminal where their course and section
choices are fed into an information bank, kept up to date with
the status of courses. If all selections are accepted, then the
only item left is the ID validation and the student is finished
with what used to be a dreaded chore.
If all selections are not available, the student can imme-
diately feed in any alternatives. "Priority lines" will be avail-
able for those who'd rather sit down and ponder their time
schedules.
In addition, the computer will be used for drop-add activity.
University departments benefit by gathering information on who's
taking what in the way of courses, in order to understand the
trends of student selection.
-JAY LEVIN
Food for thought
"Americans don't realize that 'international' includes the
United States," says Josue Njock, a University graduate teaching
assistant from Cameroun, "yet their input is important to in-
ternational events."
Specifically, Njock wishes more Americans would share In
the "International Luncheon." Njock is co-ordinator of the lun-
cheons, which combine food, served by Church Women United,
with speakers and discussions on current issues. The luncheons
are served at noon every Tuesday at the International Center,
and cost 50 cents.
Njock sees the luncheons as "a means of communication
through informal discussion" among foreigners and Americans."
Because people of various viewpoints attend the luncheons,
many sides of international issues come out. "Once in a while,
things get very hot," says Njock, "such as the recent discussion
of the Arab-Israeli conflict."
Many of the luncheon speakers are people from the Uni-
versity community who are directly concerned with current
topics. "In a community like this there is a tremendous amount
of resources," maintains Njock. Other speakers are experts from
outside Ann Arbor, such as Jean-Pierre Debris, a former politi-
cal prisoner in Vietnam, who spoke at a recent luncheon.

The International Luncheons, sponsored by the Ecumenical
Campus Center and the International Center, began in 1962.
Their original purpose has not changed: learning and under-
standing through the exchange of ideas among people of all
countries.
-MARY MILLER
Mini Course 418
AND
OPEN TO ALL FACULTY AND STUDENTS
MARCH 9 and 10, 1975
REGIONAL CONFERENCE:
ASSOCIATION FOR JEWISH STUDIES
Co-Sponsor: Committee on Judaic Studies, LSA
with DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS
DEPARTMENT OF NEAR EASTERN STUDIES
TOPIC: Hebrew and Jewish Languages
" MARCH 9-2:00 P.M., MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Prof. Joshua Blau, The Historical Periods of the
Hebrew Lonquacje
Prof. Jonas Greenfield, Aramaic Dialects
" MARCH ,10-9:00 A.M., RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
Prof. Marvin Herzog, Yiddish
Prof. Georqe Jochnowitz, Judeo-Romance Lanquages
Prof. Herbert Paper, Judeo-Persian
" MARCH 10-2:00 P.M., RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
Prof. Joshua Blau, Judeo-Arabic
Prof. Jonas Greenfield, The Lanquages of Palestine,
200 B.C.E.-200 C.E.
* MARCH 10-8:00 P.M., BNAI BRITH HILLEL
FOUNDATION

oellen
Chicagc
CHICAGO (P)-Mayor Richard
Daley has trounced his first pri-
mary election opposition in 20
years, and his Republican op-
ponent says that he will with-
draw from the mayoral race.
"The machine has reached its
ultimate peak. I've had it," said
Republican John Hoellen, who
was due to face Daley in the
April mayoral election. "It's
impossible in the climate of
total control by the Democratic
organization for any opponent
to survive its raw power and
brute force."
HOELLEN said the size of
Daley's victory Tuesday was
"beyond my comprehension, at-
tacked as he was by almost all
of the media."
Daley, 72, seeking his sixth
four-year term, was challenged
in a party primary for the first
time in the two decades he has
occupied the fifth-floor City
Hall mayoral office.
His age and health as well as
the city's corruption and crime
were some of the key issues
raised by three challengers.
FOR THE first time, Daley,
who has recovered from a
stroke he suffered last May,
failed toreceive theaendorse-
ment of a major Chicago daily
newspaper.
His former protege, Edward
Hanrahan, now ostracized from
the regular organization and
running on his own, had been
expected to take some key,
usually loyal Daley ethnic votes,
and a black candidate, state
Sen. Richard Newhouse had
hoped to make inroads into the
usually heavy black vote given
to the city's political machine.
The leading challenger, Alder-
mantWilliam Singer spent 18
months and up to $750,000 put-
ting together an organization in
the city's 50 wards he hoped
would rival Daley's. To have a
chance, the Singer camp said,
a large voter turnout of 750,000
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 124
Thursday, February 27, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).
day through Saturday morning.

to drop

from

eggie' Uon: Something
different in fast food fare

mayoral race

By CHARLES LIPSITZ
Tired of preparing food for
yourself at home day after day?
On the verge of pulling your
hair out at the prospect of con-
fronting another dorm meal?
Well consider this; there's a
new restaurant called the Vege-
table Union you may like to try.
The Vegetable Union is a
vegetarian restaurant, serving
no meat, but a variety of dishes
offering, as Head Cook Dan
Bredehorst p r o u d 1 y boasts,
"Good wholesome food, made
with fresh cheese, milk, vege-
tables, plus more."
THE IDEA for the restaurant,
one of but a few of its kind
here in Ann Arbor, is credited
to Pat Harrigan and Charles
Riedel, the later of which now
serves as manager of the es-
tablishment. Located at the left
rear section of the Union Sta-
tion in the Michigan Union, the
Vegetable Union, according to
Bredehorst was, "Originally in-
tended to provide a salad bar
only for customers, but has de-
veloped into a full fledged res-
taurant offering a total meal."
"Everything here is made
fresh daily," Bredehorst con-
fidently declares. "That's spe-

cial when you consider that 85
to 100 per cent of the food that
most people consume daily is
either pre-packaged, individual-
ly wrapped, or loaded with all
kinds of preservatives."
He adds that none of the food
in his kitchen has been sub-
jected to any previous pre-
processing techniques. "We use
no cans, everything is fresh,
organic, from scratch," says
Bredehorst.
ONE MAY pick from various
food items presented cafeteria-
style on the serving line. Brede-
horst points out that the cus-
tomer can, "Begin the meal
with our 'Super Salad,' con-
taining, according to your pref-
erence, anything from cheese
and peppers, to carrots and
cauliflower. There are cheese
specials ranging from cheese
casseroles prepared with broc-
coli or cauliflower, to spaghetti
with cheese.

"Homemade soups are also
featured for your meal," Brede-
horst asserts. "In the area of
beverages, the selection ranges
from cold apple cider delivered
locally, to chilled tomato juice,
coffee and fine herb teas pre-
pared special daily. For dessert
there are various fruits, freshly
baked goods from a local bak-
ery, and soon to be added is
Mountain High Ice-cream. You
may also pick from a selection
of home made yogurts including
banana-raisin and apple cina-
mon."
The food is only half the
story, though. Bredehorst des-
cribes the Vegetable Union, "as
a showcase for local talent, with
music performed by many dif-
ferent groups playing a variety
scoping from blue grass coun-
try, to folk and popular music.
The restaurant provides a place
for local talent to go and put on
a show for the people."

David's Books Invites You
i To A
SPRING
MASQUERADE
BALL

Hoellen

to 800,000 persons would be
needed.
WHEN the results were tal-
lied, a record 830,000 of the 1.5
million registered voters cast
ballots.I
The result: Daley, 58 per cent!
of the vote: Singer, 29 per cent;
Newhouse, eight per cent; and
Hanrahan, five per cent.
In addition, Hoellen; who had
sought to retain the only Re-
publican seat on the City Coun-
cil which he has held since 1947,
lost to a Daley organization-
backed candidate for Alderman.
IN OTHER aldermanic elec-
tions, independents appeared to
have lost one of the six seats

they now hold and another, the
seat Singer vacated, was forced
into a runoff.
Even though Hoellen easily
won the ;Republican mayoral
primary, he saw no use in con-
tinuing.
"Obviously, it's impossible for
me to run in April," he said.
"If .I can't win /my own con-
stituency, how can I possibly
win the city? I probably will not
be a candidate."
Hoellen said he will ask the
Republican leadership to picl
a more viable opponent to face
Daley in April. Hoellen headed
a search committee for several
months to find a candidate and
agreed to run only after others
refused.

ii

POETRY READING
with
Lemuel Johnson
READING FROM HIS WORKS
BURS., FEB. 27-7:30 p.m.
at
IILD HOUSE-802 Monroe

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Starts This Friday

Head Librarian positions offer a unique opportunity to learn and exercise
skills in educational programing as well as personnel supervision. The re-
sponsibilities include the general day-to-day care of a residence hall library,
supervision of a staff, and the formulation of special programs and events
for hall residents. The positions carry a 20 hour/week time commitment.

I~arsmrevie
A great collection! Over 50 pacesetters exposing America's postwar
love affair with sports cars. To stir memories: ads,
news pix, music of the period. Plus a dozen classic
Jags from the '36 SS to the '71 V-12. Racing flicks, too.
rliy A F/a t e i1-10

QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the Ann
Arbor Campus in good academic standing during the period of employment.
(2) Must be Junior status or above during the period of employment. (3)
Must have lived in residence halls at University level for at least one year.
(4) Must have had some library work experience (high school library, etc.).
(5) Must have a 2.5 grade point average at the end of the Fall Term 1974.

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