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February 27, 1975 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-27

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thuiirsdacv. Februairv27. 19Q75

______________________________________...____.__________________

i y .1-1, 1 7r .;

i

EFFECTIVE MARCH 2,1975
Ann Arbor Greyhound Station
will be open as follows:
Monday thru Thursday
7:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.
Fridays and Sundays

President says U.S.
must aid Cambodia

Saturd

7:30 a.m. to 10:10 p.m.
lays
7:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m.

PACKAGE EXPRESS HOURS will run from 8:00 a.m. to
7:30 p.m. Sunday thru Saturday.

i i

(Continued from Page 1)
season ends.
S C H L E S I N G E R testi-
fied to the House defense ap-
propriations subcommittee that
the probability for Cambodia's
survival is "extremely high" if
Congress approves more aid al-
though he did not assure that.
"There is no such thing as a
guarantee," Schlesinger said.
Schlesinger said that ammu-
nition from neighboring coun-
tries can be moved into Cam-
bodia almost immediately if
Congress does nothing more
than lift the $200 million ceil-
ing on Cambodia's military
aid.
O THE R WIS E, he said,
the Cambodian government will
"run out of ammunition some-
where around the end of March
give or take a week. Once that
ammunition is expended Phnom
Penh cannot survive."

S e n a t e sources indicated
there was no move to do that.
Schlesinger said Ford's $222
million request for Cambodia
would be ample to carry Cam-
bodia's army through the end
of June. Ford is expected to
request additional aid for Cam-
bodia for the fiscal year that
begins July 1.
Meanwhile, Senate Demo-
cratic Leader Mike Mansfield
said he hopes Congress rejects
Ford's request for additional
aid for Cambodia and South
Vietnam.
MANSFIELD said Ford is
seeking "an indefinite partici-
pation on our part in the af-
fairs of countries to which we
have no commitment."
"The more aid we give the
more killings there will be,"
he said.

I

Voter
leaflet'
s tailed
(Continued from Page 1)
be about $1000. However, since
much of the cost would be ab-
sorbed in the SGC operating
budget, the actual cost would
be around $300. He went on to
say that the earliest a mailing
list couldsbe obtained would be
three days.
THIS MEANS that if council
requested the mailing list today
it would not be received until
Monday-meaning letters would
not be received until after
spring
The letter is a completely non-
partisan appeal for students to
register to vote for the April
general election and includes a
list of voter registration sites.
LEADS SIXTH TIME
COLUMBUS, Ohio (P-) - The
United States Trotting Assn. re-
ports that Herve Filion of An-
gers, Que., has led North Amer-
ican harness drivers in victories
the past four years, and in mon-
ey the past six years. The 34-
year-old driver piloted his own
helicopter for day and night
racmg and turned in 445 victor-
ies in 1973. Horses he drove
earned $2,233,302.

(Continued from Page 1)
to indicate within three weeks
after the ratification of the
contract whether they wanted
to join the union. This only
would apply to the present
term. Next year a full agency
shop clause would be in effect.
Dave Gordon maintains that
the bargaining team may still
settle for this proposal.
THE UNIVERSITY has taken
two stands on the issue as well.
Their official proposal calls for
an exemption from the clause
for all graduate employes who
are teaching in fulfillment of a
degree requirement. Also, the
proposal would provide for de-
partmental elections to deter-
mine which departments had a
majority of union members.
Only in those departments
would a shop clause be granted.
Their softer, unofficial posi-
tion calls for the same exemp-
tion for degree requirement
teachers, butwould only call
for a single election of all em-
ployes eligible for member-
ship. Should atmajority be un-
ion members, the clause would
be granted.
" Economics. The GEO is de-
manding a fifteen percent re-
bate on this term's tuition, a
$420 per term frozen tuition fee
beginning next year, and a
seven per cent average wage
increase.
The University has offered a
ten percent tuition rebate for

this term, a frozen tuition fee
of $440 for next term, and a 5.6
percent average salary increase
effective next year.
" Definition of fraction. An
employment fraction is simply
a number which defines the
amount of work a graduate em-
ploye does. For instance, a
graduate employe with a quar-'
ter time appointment would
work ten hours out of a possible
forty hour work week.
The GEO wishes to define
clearly the definition of fraction
because some of their constitu-
ents have claimed that they are
not being paid wages equivalent
to their designated fraction.
The parties have agreed that
a grievance procedure is neces-
sary for this clause, but the
University does not want the
grievance proceedure to go into
effect until next term. The GEO
insists that this is necessary.

Negotiations stall

"U' to get
large coin
collection
(Continued from Page 1)
apparently began when wartime
inflation in Europe prompted
Pernt to begin safeguarding his
money by investing in gold
coins.
University Museum of Art Di-
rector Bret Waller is currently
evaluating t h e collection to
judge how much of the collec-
tion should be retained for dis-
play and how much should be
sold. The Regents will make a
final decision on the matter
based on Waller's recommenda-
tion.
It is stipulated in Pernt's will
that revenue from sale of the
coins must be used to provide
scholarships for biology and
phyiscs students.

IS FRIDAY
the last day you can
register to vote?
The deadline for the Spring elections is
March 8, but since that's during vaca-
tion, you must register before you leave.
WHERE TO REGISTER:
Michigan Union .. 10-2,2-5
Public Library.........9-9
City Hall... ........ 9-5
A new rent control proposal, funding
for child care, door-to-door voter regis-
tration, mayor's race, and city council
races in all wards will be on the ballot
in April..

.> (CO .mst)G'Y <= ;::;s)G7(
WILD WEFT
Q
YARNS
For weaving, knitting,
crocheting, macrame
415 North Fifth Ave., Kerrytown II
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
313-761-2466
0 "'"**=~***~~~~4~~~-'*~~='"<=>" "

Conference on food
shortage scheduled

RENT

ME TA

(Ford may approve
plan to raise tax cut

(Continued from Page 1)
grams, and consumer issues
will take place during the week.
AN ETHNIC dinner and a
"Non-Meat Ball" are planned
for the evening of March 15.
The ethnic meal, sponsored by
the African Students Group, will
benefit the African Famine Re-
lief. The vegetarian dinner will
take place in the Union Ball-
room, and guests are eni:our-
aged by sponsors to attend the
meal dressed as any non-meat
food.
Workshops on community food
production are now being plan-
ned. Participating in them would
be the Farm Bureau of Washte-
naw County, County nutrition-
ists, and local residents experi-
enced in organic farming.
Food Week participants will

advertise t h e i r concerns by
passi:'g out leaflets on nutrition
in local supermarkets on week-
ends throughont March. Also
persons dressed in Mr. Peanut
oitfits will exhort shoppers 'to
help prevent grain shortages by
buying foods other than meat
as protein sources.
THE FAC IS a coalition of
about 150 University students
and local residents. The organi-
zation is working on the Food
Week project with the Center
for Science and Public Interest
based in Washington, D.C., and
several other national groups.
Program coordinator Ravich
expects the event to cost from
$10-$15,000. The money will come
mostly from the University, and
partly from local donations.

for SPRING BREAK
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broadcasts in QUAD-in the Dolby System?
is backed by 10,000 watts of power?
informs you of local happenings?
Is involved in the community?
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MINDS... MOUNTAINS ...AVDMORE
" "
WITH THESE NEW PENGUINS
THE SHAPE OF MINDS TO COME. John G. Taylor. A startling
report on the extraordinary potentials and awesome dangers of the
mind-mechanics of the future. $2.75
MOUNT ANALOGUE: A Novel of Symbolically Authentic
Non-Euclidean Adventures in Mountain Climbing. Rene Daumal.
Translation and Introduction by Roger Shattuck. Postface by
Vera Daumal. Daumal's last work, this extraordinary novel tells the
unfinished story of a voyage aboard the yacht Impossible and the..
ascent of a symbolic mountain. e
THE PENGUIN WORLD ATLAS. Edited by Peter Hall. This
unique new milestone in cartography presents a variety of physical
and demographic features together on the same maps. Published
in large format, with 128 pages of maps in full color and a gazetteer.
of over 60 pages. $5.95
THE GAME OF WIZARDS: Psyche, Science, and Symbol in
the Occult. Charles Ponce. The first book to expose the hidden link
between the human psyche and the world of the occult. $2.50
SCIENCE FICTION, TODAY AND TOMORROW. Edited by
Reginald Bretnor. This unique anthology surveys the role of science
fiction in the modern world. "The most interesting volume dealing
with science fiction that I have ever read."-Isaac Asimov. $2.95
SEXUAL IDENTITY CONFLICT IN CHILDREN AND
ADULTS. Richard Green, M.D. An intimate look at children and
adults so unhappy with their anatomical sexuality that they seek to
change their sex. $3.95
THE SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: and Other Guns with
Which America Won the West, Protected Bootleg Franchises, Slew
Wildlife, Robbed Countless Banks, Shot Husbands Purposely and'
by Mistake, and Killed Presidents-Together with the Debate over
Continuing Same. Robert Sherrill. A shocking report on the role
of guns in American life. $2.75
These new Penguins are now a"a"i*
at your campus bookstore

(Continued from Page 1)
for his proposals, brought these
other major disclosures:
" He has asked the Justice
Department and other agencies
to investigate charges that Arab
nations are blacklisting Jewish-
owned firms. "Such discrimina-
tion is totally contrary to the
American tradition and repug-
nant to American principles,"
he declared;
" He defended U.S. arms
sales, terming them necessary
to maintain proper military bal-
ance in many areas of the
world;
0 ". . . I think if people in
a country want to fight for
freedom for their country, to
the degree that we can, I think
we ought to expand freedom
around the world," Ford said;
and
" He again predicted that the
rise in unemployment will ease
in the third quarter of this year.
"Most experts agree that we
are bottoming out," Ford said.
He said there is little he can do
to ease the problem without
congressional action.
THE PRESIDENT, as he has
repeatedly in his series of trips
across the country, chided Con-
gress for failing to enact a tax
cut. He said at its current pace,

Congress might not complete
work on a tax cut until June. "I
think that is very ill-advised and
extremely serious," he said of
that possibility.j
Many of theynews conference
questions centered on the econ-
omy, and Ford used the occa-
sion to prod Congress again for
action on his tax cut plan as
well as his energy proposals.
"I am perplexed . . . I don't
understand why Congress is
moving so slowly," the Presi-
dent said, adding that "I intend
to keep the pressure on."
HE SAID it could be June
before action is completed on
a tax cut. "The parliamentary
process has been slowed down
in the Congress, and the coun-
try has been the loser," he said.
In addition to signaling a
willingness to accept a larger
tax cut than he has proposed,
Ford again indicated he is ready
to work out a compromise
energy program with the Demo-
cratic-controlled Congress.
"What we need is a plan that
the Democrats can agree on ...
and then we can sit down and,
hopefully, negotiate," he said.
"I am willing to cooperate, but
we have to have something to
cooperate with . . ."

Thursday, February 27
Day Calendar
ISMRRD: C. Deutsch, "Environ-
mentalyl Determined Learning Dis-
abilities;" F. Redy, "kids Who Look
Like Perceptually Handicapped, But
Ain't," 130 S. 1st, 9:30 am-noon.
WUOM: Grey Hodnett, York U.,
"Succession in the Soviet Union,"
part of mini-course, "Succession
in the Soviet Union," part of mini-
course, "Succession Crises-East &
West," 10:10 am.
Ctr. Japasese Studies: Bag lunch/
lecture, Walter Kato, Argonne U.,
"Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy
in Japan," Lane Hall Commons
Rm., noon.
Education: Carl Berger, "Educa-
tion in China," 2219 SEB, noon.
Pendleton Arts Information Ctr.:
Open hearth, Percy Danforth, "Mr.
Bones," Unioon, 12:10 pm.
Ethics, Religion: Woman and
Religion Symposium-Sarah Ward,
dir., Program for Children with
Learning Problems, Boston, "The
Contemporary Women's Movement
and its Effect on Black Women and
the Church," Kuenzel Lounge, Un-!
ion, 1:30-3:30 pm; Carol Weiner, Il-
ham Altalib, "The Contemporary
women's Movement and its Effect
on Traditional Religions," Kuen-
zel Lounge, 4 pm; Jeannette Pic-
card, Episcopal minister, "A The-
ology of Equality-Are Women
People?" Aud. C, Angell, 8:30 pm.
Environmental Studies: A. Feldt,
"Decentralism in the Urban Com-
munity," 4001 CC Little, 3 pm.
MHRI: Philip Groves, U. of Colo-
rado, "Neuronal Mechanisms of
Habituation;" 1057 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
Ctr. Early Childhood Develop-
ment, Educ.: Eliz. Boggs, Inst. oof
Children & Families, "Ethical Issues
in the Management of the Disabled
Child," Schorling Aud., SEB, 4 pm.
CREES: M. Sokolewicz, Polish
Acad. of Sciences, "Decision Mak-
ing in Poland," W. Conf. Rm.,
Rackham, 4 pm.
Chemistry: Kenneth H. Keller, U.
port Problems in Flowing Blood,"

PHILIP GROVES
DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
BOULDER, COLORADO
"NEURONAL MECHANISMS
OF HABITUATION"
FEBRUARY 27
MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE SEMINAR SERIES
TEA: 3:14 p.m., Room 2059
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m., Room 1057

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
$i.:.1': "C J }}: { i4:"}f.{s5"-: : :; Eti: i:'F .'S.v-1tY

of Minnesota, "Some Mass Trans-
3513 E. Eng., 4 pm.
Physics: R. D. Bent, U. of In-
diana, "The Indiana University
Cyclotron.Facility," P&A Colloq.
Rm., 4 pm.
Spanish Lang., Culture Films: Yo
Soy Chicano, 126 Res. Coll., 4 pm.
Int'l Night: Food from British
Isles, Leogue, 5-7:15 pm.
Music School: Varsity Band, Bill
IAud., 8 pm; degree recital, Leon
Brooks, clarinet doctoral, Recital
Hall, 8 pm.
Women's Studies Films: Growing
Up Female: As Six Become One;
Woo Who? May Wilson, Lec. Rm.
1, MLB, 8 pm. (Will not be shown
for duration of strike)
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7460
Rotary Clubs offer 1 graduate
fellowship from each district, to
cover education and living expenses
plus transportation, for study in
any field and in foreign countries;
Also undergrad scholarships, awards
to teachers of the handicapped, and
for technical training; more infor-
oration At CP&P.
Harv d Summer School offers
their annual course in publishing,
June 30-Aug. 8, $600. Good record
of placements in magazine & book
publishing, etc. Write Mrs. Diggory
Venn, Dir., 10 Garden St., Cam-
bridge, Ma 02138.
For 12-month MA in Poll Sol
at McMaster U. in Canada, fellow-
ships of $3,950-$4,650. Includes
teaching experience and possible
seminar in Eastern Europe. Write:
Prof. Bromke, Hamilton, Ontario
L8s 4M4.
Wednesday, March 13, 1975
Recruiting on campus: Roosevelt
University/Lawyer's Assistant Pro-
gram - Seniors interested in para-
legal training; Helplone - Monroe
County Community Mental Health
Ctr., Education Coordinator - Co-
ordinate and super. Community
Education and Outreach program
for a substance abuse agency - B's
in Psych, Soc., Soc. Wk. or related
degree; and Johnson & Johnson -
Production Management position.
Paid position for graduate stu-
dents at Iowa St. U. as Residence
Hall Advisor: apt.,ymeals, and $261
me. for academic yr. Deadline Ap-
ril 15. Write 1220 Wallace-Wilson
Commons, Ames, Iowa 50010.
Undergraduate students interested
in emotionally disturbed children -
traineeships and summer camp
counselor jobs with Devereux Foun-
dation in 7 states. Write Dr. Hen-
ry Platt, Devon, PA 19333.
Montessori teacher training pro-
gram June 16 - Aug. 1 in Drayton
Plains, Mich., for college gradu-
ates - tuition $775. Also a winter
program including internship, $1250.
I'
$3.00 &:30
FRI. ONLY
the legendary
RAMBLIN'
JACK

HAVE

YOU

wr . -

plug into QUADROCK

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Here March

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mr. david's
tt styling salon
"Continental"
hair styling
Ultra sophisti-
caled stereo music
T-
Appointments
only in advonce
The latest hype
on hair care
Gentleman's Quar-
terly magazine
.Shampoo,
style, blow
dry, hair
spray and
massage just
$15.00

i
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COMPARED?
MICHIGAN
UNION
BARBERS
HAIRCUTS THAT WON p (
EMBARRASS YOU M
T.V.
n
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WALK IN 000
ANY TIME o
0
GETIHE LATEST.o
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SPORTS ILLUS-
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HAIRCUT-x3.50
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11

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Snowmobile Contest!

The SUPER1

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PRIZE: A Suzuki 340 Nomad Snowmobile
Entry Forms available at the following locations:

3,

JIM BRADLEY PONTIAC -GMC TRUCK INC.-
3500 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor

THE SLEEPY OWL GIFT SHOP--107 East
Michiaan, Saline

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A .Ur I %

ELLIOTT

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