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January 28, 1975 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-28

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Tuesday, January 28, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Tuesday, January 28, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

ar rages 2 years
after Paris accord
By Reuter
The second anniversary of the Paris peace agreement on
Vietnam was celebrated grimly yesterday with U. S. officials
reporting that nearly one third of South Vietnam's Air Force
was grounded because of fuel shortages.
In Cambodia insurgents fired 10 rockets into Phnom Penh
and nearby Pochentong Airport killing four people and wound-
ing five others, the Cambodian high command reported last night.
MEANWHILE IN Bangkok, Thailand, a coalition government
and a fragmented national assembly were the only clear results
in the first general election since 1969.
The U. S. officials also said artillery and air-to-ground mis-
siles were in short supply and the South Vietnamese Militia
forces - the regional forces and the popular forces - were{
suffering from weapon shortages.
Their comments came at the Ford administration tried to
build up support for an additional Congressional appropriation
of $300 million for South Vietnam, bringing military aid to Saigon

Southern
senators'
power
erodes
WASHINGTON (Ap) - South-
ern Democrats, once the sin-
gle most powerful bloc in the
Senate, are experiencing a fur-
ther loss of power in the new
Congress where they recently
lost two committee chairman-
ships.
They now are represented
by the chairmen of six of the
18 committees, compared to 10
of 16 chairmanshipsjust five
years ago. Even their control
of the six is tenuous.
FOUR OF these men are in
their 70's and some already
have announced they are serv-
ing their last terms.
This is a far cry from the sit-
uation that has existed through
most of the last three decades.
The South traditionally has
sent young Democrats to the
Senate and kept them there for
years so that they rose automa-
tically to high position through
the seniority system.
FORMER SEN. Richard Rus-
sell, (D-Ga.), their strategist
through much of that period,
saw to it that committee assign-
ments allowed a Southerner al-
ways to be waiting in the sec-
ond spot when another Dixie
senator left a committee chair-
manship.
This system no longer works
for a number of reasons. There
are fewer Southern Democrats
now because Republicans have
succeeded in winning several
seats from the region.
There also is much more
competition for Senate posts in
the South now, both in Demo-
cratic primaries and general
election races. Thus, a South-
ern Democratic senator can no
longer be assured of holding on
to his job for a lifetime.
THE TWO chairmanships lost
by the Southerners in the new
Congress were on the Govern-
ment Operations Committee,
where Sen. Abraham Ribicoff,
(D-Conn.), succeeded the re-
tiring Sam Ervin Jr., (D-N.C.),
and the Banking, Housing and
Urban Affairs Committee,
where Sen. William Proxmire,
(D-Wis.), took over from Sen.
John Sparkman, (D-Ala.).
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 98
Tuesday, January 28, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i ly Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

in this financial year to $1 bil-
lion.
TO MARK THE anniversary,
two groups holding separate
views on Vietnam held rallies
on the steps of the Capitol
building.
The larger group, about 500
people, protested U. S. support
of the governments of South
Vietnam and Cambodia. The
smaller group, numbering about
50 people, called for an end of
North Vietnamese aggression
in South Vietnam.
Continuing fighting since
the peace agreement has left
272,901 dead and wounded on
both sides, according to Sai-
gon figures.
MILITARY sources said two
107 mm rockets struck a para-
troop brigade headquarters
near tht airport.
The renewed rocket attacks
came at the tanker Bayon Tra-
der, carrying about 450,000 gal-
lons of gasoline arrived here
after surviving heavy ma-
chine gun fire and 14 rocket
hits in a 35-mile trip up the
Mekong River from the ferry1
town of Neak Luong.I
In Trailand, the nation's old-
est political party, the middle-
of-the-roah Democrats, emerged
as thelargest single power
with 72 seats in the new 269-
seat assembly - less than half
the number needed for an abso-
lute majority.
THE ASSEMBLY, expectedI
to hold its first session on Feb-I
ruary 5 or 6, seemed deeplyI
divided. Only nine parties had
more than 10 seats each, whileI
a total of 22 parties will bei
represented.
DAILY OFFICI
Tuesday, January 28
Day Calendar
WUOM: Rev. Jesse Jackson, civilr
rights Baptist minister, "The Statet
of the Human," 10:05 am.
Hospital Commission for women:
Sarah. G. Power, "Int'l Women'sc
Year," 56450 Amph., noon.s
Maternal, Child Health Films:7
Who Should Survive, 1112 Thomas
Francis Bldg., noon.
English: A. Lennig, "D. W. Grif-s
fith's Mother and the Law," Aud4,I
NLB, noon.
Career Planning & Placement:d
"Career Opportunities for Women'
in Banking," Cn. Rm., 4, 5,I
League, noon.
Music School: wind Recital, Re-
cital Hall, 12:30 pm.
ISMRRD: Jesse W. Barr, "Use of
Media for Programming of the 3
Handicapped," 130 S. First St., 3-5
pm.
Biotechnic Recentralization Lec-t
tures: Peter van Dresser, Rack-
ham Amph., 3:15-5 pm.
Classical Studies: Kelsey Mu-
seum of Archaeology: J. B. ward-,
Perkins, Inst. for Advanced Study,
Princeton, "Taste, Tradition andr
technology in Roman Architecture,"s
Aud. D, Angell, 4 pm.
0Cs: .ottieb, "Dealing with
a Bureaucracy: Does a Computer
Make it Better or worse" Lec,
Rm. 2, MLB, 4 pm.
Macromolecular Research Ctr:
Dmitriv A. Topchev, "Radical
Polymerization of Ionizable Mono
mers in Aqueous Solutions," 3005
Chemistry, 4 pm.

{ rejects
WASHINGTON ( ?) - The Su-
prem Court declined yester-
- day to hear the appeal of Gor-
don Lddy, who is serving a
term of up toh20 years in pri-
son on Watergate charges.
In other actions, the court:
0 Ruled that federal courts
must meet a "higher standard"
than state legislatures in re-
drawing districts to make them
more equal in population.
°"* Left undisturbed the rul-
ings of two lower courts that
a Minnesota law and a Massa-
chusetts hospital regulation re-
stricting abortions were uncon-
stitutional;
{ a ,, 0 Called for oral arguments
on a federal state dispute over
rich oil reserves off the Atlantic
{ d Coast. A spokesman said the
{ r ' :,.: p., ;b "" :_ :: i arguments tentatively are set
for lt nFebruary;
."} ' <.;:...., 4... .. .. eld that its ruling last
AP Photo week striking down automatic
excuses of women from jury
B stservice cannot be used to over-
Wisconsin National Guardsmen and State Troopers wrestle Sunday with Indians after they turn previous convictions of de-
refused to identify themselves or submit to a search near a religious estate which has been fendants tried by all-male jur-
occupied by the Indians for 28 days. ies; and
-- .-- - - -- - _. Agreed to hear cases in-
volving coal mine safety, labor
"IEXICO ENGLAND HiT regulations for state and city
employes, and whether prison-
ers can be tried in their jail
I 3 Iclothes.-t
Liddy, who was counsel to Nix-
on's re-election committee in
the 1972 campaign, failed to get
Explosions left at least 20 bomb in the basement of Lew- all in San Luis Potosi, about the high court to hear his argu-
Explsios a ments that he was unfairly
persons injured in London,|is's department store injured 210 miles north of here, where treated by U. S. District Judge
Manchester and Londonderry 19 people. two bombs went off in commer- . . .
yesterday - a signal of a re- Other stores in the area were cial offices. JhSirwasnhis til s
newed campaign of violence by swiftly evacuated for fear of Earlier, five bombs went Liddy was found guiltyryfsix
the extremist provisional wing other bombs. off in Mexico City and four in and conspiracy. On March 23,
of the Irish Republican Army, In Londonderry,' the predom- the eastern city of Oaxaca, 1973, he was fined $40,000 and
(IRA). inantly - Catholic second city causing extensive damage to sentenced to from six years and
In Mexico City, two people of the turbulent province of banks and government offices eight months to 20 years in
were killed and three wounded Northern Ireland, three blasts but no casualties. prison.
when communist guerrillas ex- caused fairly severe damage He was freed on bail Oct. 15
ploded 11 homemade bombs to two restaurants and a bank T H E SPOKESPERSON said but the Supreme Court over-
here and in two other cities, ( building but there were no cas- that at Oaxaca, about 230 miles turned the bail on Jan. 13
police said. ualties. .southeast of Mexico City, the
MOST SERIOUS of the five AND LAST NIGHT, in the bombers left leaflets identify-
IRA blasts during the day was heart of central London, an ex- ing themselves as members of
in the Northern England Metro- plosion damaged Gieves, mili- the Communist September 23
polis of Manchester, where a tary tailors to such clients as League, Mexico's biggest ur-
'MAdmiral Lord Nelson, ex-Em- ban guerrilla group.
..., t... peror Haile Selassie of Ethiopia The
and scores of foreign heads of Lagunate in army
UL BULLETIN state the only casualty was a ory of a gunbattle with army s
I security guard who sustained trest10 years ague ri la group
Great Lakes Research: Theo. slight shock. It claimed responsibility for Ann Arbor
smayda, U. of Rhode Island, "Dy- sihts It claimeddtesponsibalktb fo and
namics of a Coscinodiscus Popula- Gieves is located at the several big bank robberies and needs.
tion During Two Days," white southern end of Bond street, kidnappings last year.
Aud., Coolley Lab, 4 pm. one of Europe's best-known cen- __--L
English: A. Lennig, "The Ameri- ters for art galleries and ex-.I p l Listen for t Soon
can Horror Film of the 1930's," pensive fashionMost people can tell ut-
screening, Black Cat, Aud. 4, MLB, The wave of bombings seem- terflies and moths apart. You
Residential College: John Allen, ed to indicate the start of a re- see butterflies mainly in the
"Film and visual Arts: The Fore- newed campaign of violence by daytime, moths at night.
sight of Languages," Greene the extremist provisional wing - - - -- CAR EER
Lounge, E. Quad, 7 pin. of the I.R.A. Though none of ar un o
Bio-Ethics Series: Wm. W. War- the blasts was Hattr- H
del .of Rochester Med. School, tebat a officially ati
"Human Subject Experimentation," bted to the underground guer- the Whole Family '
Rackham Amph., 8:30 pm. rilla organization. Appointments Available
Psychiatry: Robt. R. Holt, NYU, AHEREnHAVEtbeAn almbst
"Current Status of Psychoanalytic THERE HAVE been almost DASCOLA BARBER- The fo
Theory," Children's Hosp., Aud, daily bombings in Northern Ire- with e
Med. Ctr., 8 pm. land since the I.R.A. provision- FTLST irsteN
Music School: Alan Cook, organ als ended their 25-day Christ- Arborland--971-9975 Firstn.
Doctoral, Hill Aud., 8 pm. ma truce 11 days ago. Maple Villae-761-2733 Bank.
General Notices __.1iety6892 grad.
CEw: Coping with Re-Entry, 3- In Mexico a police spokes- E. Liery-662grads,
part discussion series, "In the person said the casualties were E. Universit-662-0354 lunch.

Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05
Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
jelly-$1.50
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & JeII-$2.10

Specials This Week
Beef Stroganoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Eaq Rolls
Home-made Soups (Beef,
Barley, Clam Chowder, etc.)
Chili, Vegetable Tempura
(served after 2 p~m.)
Hamburger Steak Dinner-
( 1/2 lb.) ....$1.89
Spaghetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice
Delicious Korean Bar-q Beef
(served after 4 Daily)

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
presents
TARTUFFE
Jan. 29, 30, 31 and Feb. 1
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
CURTAIN 8 P.M.
Box Office opens daily 10 a.m.
763-1085

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
Home Cooking Is Our Specialty

FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

I&Uni*v. I

0

-2111t v/ -r I .

4,

mT"Mmwmp

SUN. 9-8
CLOSED MON.
TUES. -SAT. 8-8
769-2288
1313 SO UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS
BREAD ad ROSES
a new play by Donald Hall

_, x

WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 5,6, 7, 8, 1975 8:00 P.M.
THE POWER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

A. '

T i
-
-.' n
ADVANCE SALE AND INFORMATION:.
TICKET OFFICE ,MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, 764-0450
TICKETS NOW ON SALE

i

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WOMEN IN BANKING
urth in a series of informal lunch hour discussions
mployers and graduate school representatives from
ational Bank of Chicago and Harris Trust & Savings
ALL WOMEN WELCOME-Freshpeople, seniors,
students, faculty, and staff. Feel free to bring your
4ESDAY, Jan. 28 at 12 Noon
HELD IN CONFERENCE ROOMS 4 & 5
MICHIGAN LEAGUE

Classroom," noon-2 pm, Feb. 4,;
"Around the Campus," Feb. 12;
"Within Yourself," Feb. 18; for
more info, contact 328-330 Thomp-
son St.~ 763-1353.
Studying Too Hard?
Free lecture
on Hypnosis
Wed. at 7:30
ANN ARBOR
HYPNOSIS CENTER
611 CHURCH, Suite 3029
761-0440

HAVING TROUBLE CHOOSING
MAJOR OR OCCUPATION?

A

Planning $
Placement
764-7460

TL

A special vocational clinic will be start-
ing soon at the Univeristy of Michigan
Counseling Center.
Pre-registration necessary. For information and
registration call 764-9466, or stop in at the
Counseling Center--1007 E. Huron

0

Spring Break-DAYTONA BEACH

REDUCED RATE
FOR COUPLES
EVERY TUESDAY
BI IARDS at
the Union

i

0

K ________ ___-
17

____.- l i

I

Medicine
Dentistry
Osteopathy
Veterinary
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
INFORMATION MEETING

DO YOU RESPECT, ADMIRE, OR LIKE ONE OF YOUR TEACHERS OR
ASSOCIATES, YOUNG OR OLD, SHORT OR TALL, MAN OR WOM-
AN, TEACHING ASSISTANT OR PROFESSOR, ENOUGH TO FEEL
THAT SUCH PERSON DESERVES SPECIAL RECOGNITION OF THEIR
WORK AND DEDICATION? IF SO, THEN PLEASE READ ON.
FACULTY AWARDS

* FEB. 28-MARCH 9
*.INCLUDES ALL TRANSPORTATION
o INCLUDES ALL ACCOMMODATIONS
* 8 DAYS-7 NIGHTS IN DAYTONA
* FREE PARTIES WHILE TRAVELING

I

* DISNEY WORLD OPTIONS

ANNOUNCING FOR

1975

* 2 FREE B-B-QUES IN

DAYTONA

I

11

CAREER

Distinguished Teaching Assistant Awards
Up to 10 awards of $500 each will be given to qualified teaching assistants or pre-
doctoral lecturers who have made or are making a maior impoct on students pri-
marily throucih excellence in teaching and counseling.
Distinguished Service Awards
Up to 6 awards of $750 each will be given to post doctoral Lecturers, Instructors,
Assistant Professors, or Associate Professors under 30 years of age for excellence in
teachina and counselina.
Distinguished Achievement Awards
Up to 5 awards of $1000 each will be given to Associate or Full Professors for excel-
lence in teachina, research, and service.

TOTAL PRICE
51535O

THE
"ACTION
TRIP"

Tues., Jan. 28-8 p.m.
1025 Angell Hall

Sign up Early

No Gas Worries

TIM

NEIL

!.l I I

Wll I

® I u.. Q.. r. i I - r-- -- r r w~r

Is

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