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January 28, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January Z8, 19751

U.S., trade
production fall
WASHINGTON (Reuter)-The The startling effect on U.
United States, feeling the ill trade of the threefold increas
effects of bath inflation and re- in oil prices was highlighted b
cession, took more economic Commerce Secretary Frederi

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 28, I975~

S.
ise
by
.ck

FUTURE WORLDS presents
JESSICA TUCHMAN
"Determination of Government and
Decisions on Technology"
RACKHAM AU D. -8 p.m.
next MON., FEB. 3
UAC TRAVEL presents
SKI UTAH
MARCH 1-8
DEADLINE TO SIGN-UP: FEB. 5
Also, student flights to New York, L.A., San
Francisco and Dallas during Spring Break.
SPECIAL RATES ON ALL FLIGHTS
Call the UAC Travel office (763-2147) for more
information
MEDIATRICS presents
THE WILD ONE
MARLON BRANDO in a classic tale of a
motorcycle gang.
STILL ONLY $1
JAN. 30 7 :00, 8:30, 10 p.m.
NATURAL SCIENCE AUD.
UAC and the People's
Bicentennial Commission present
Prof. Michael Whitty
"Depression Blues: Working Class History
in the Bicentennial Era"
WED., JAN. 29-7:30 p.m.
Pendleton Room, Michigan Union
Applications Available
FOR
Senior Officers
1975-76
POSITIONS: President
Chief Financial Officer
Coordinating Vice President
Public Relations Vice Pres.
APPLICATIONS DUE FEB. 12
Available in the UAC Office, 2nd floor
Michigan Union, or Call 763-1107

I

knocks yesterday with figures
showing that last year it suf-
fered its second biggest trade
deficit and first recorded de-
cline in productivity.
Sharply rising oil prices ac-
counted for a trade deficit of
about $3.1 billion last year, sta-
tistics issued by the Commerce
Department here showed.
IT WAS a dramatic turnabout
from 1973, when the United
States had a surplus of about
$1.3 billion.
In 1973, there were 7,123 hos-
pitals in the United State reg-
istered by the American Hospi-
tal Assn. About $36.3 billion
was spent to provide services
for both inpatients and out-
patients, a cost of $173 per resi-
dent of the nation.

Dent who said: "Without the
burden of tripled petroleum im-
port costs, our trade account
would have been in surplus .. .
by $14 billion."
At the same time, the Labor
Department reported that, for
the first time since the govern-
ment started keeping records
in 1947, the output of American
workers per man hour declined
in the private sector.
IN RELATED developments:
-Senator Edward Kennedy
(D-Mass.) introduced legislation
to provide an immediate tax
cut of $15 billion for individuals.
-The White House said Pres-
ident Ford might veto a bill
raising the debt ceiling if it
was linked with legislation that
prevents him imposing oil im-
port fees.
SOON
all of Ann Arbor
will be Rocking
with
-la 1

TO GET

AP Photo

U.S. POSTAL
SERVICE FACTS
WATCH
"THE TODAY SHOW"
7 A.M.
CHANNELS 4-10-13

Sleeping dogs lie
Dane, opt for a nap in the stalls during the Wisconsin Kennel Club's 55th annual dog

U

1

FOCUS: Workshops for
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
Applications are now available for the
following groups:
Men's Group Leaderless Thesis Support
Women's Group Black Graduate Student
Couple's Group Women with Student
States of Husbands
Consciousness Recently Divorced
Groups will begin meeting soon so apply
now. Groups will meet, usually once a
week, for the Winter Term. There is NO
FEE for participating and unless otherwise
noted each group will be led by experi-
enced facilitators.
Details and applications available at:
COUNSELING SERVICES
304 Michigan Union
764-8437

show last Sunday.
The largest train robbery oc-
curred when the Royal Mail
Train was ambushed in Eng-
land in 1963. More than $7 mil-
lion was taken and less than$1
million recovered.
"WE MAKE YOU
FEEL GOOD."
U-M STYLI STS
at the Union

(Contiued from Page1)
work," Ghent comments. "It's
a tool that can help us work
more effectively."
IRVING Baranski, a CJI em-
ploye, explains that "formerly,
reports were written and sub-
mitted, when officers had the
time and whenever they could

STATEWIDE NETWORK:
Computer joins local police

iteamfrom CJI that spent five more readily accessible."

months studying the depart-
ment to mold the system to
meet the city's needs.
Under the new system, tape
recordings of police reports are
transcribed into one of two city
Sycor 340 computer terminals
w h i c h simultaneously print

II

I

Graduate
JOBSMI
Positions in teachi

come into the station, and it, copies of the reports for the
was often the next day before city's records and send selected
a detective got the report." information for transmission to
Baranski led a three-man the state Criminal Justice Data
Center in Grand Rapids.
THE SPARMIS computer
transmits a set of weekly re-
ports on vital crime statistics
Us to the city police department.
This information is used :o de-
termine periodic-even daily-
shifts in police patrols -o com-
. . 76 pensate for new patterns of
7576 crime in the city.
All the information that is
tabulated and formulized under
SPARMIS has been avilable to
the department in the ast, but
the time required to assemble
e-East Quad- it had made the cost prohnibi-
rogram When asked about possioie fu-
oom & board plus ture applications of tie com
r academic year) cer Ghent said that "we're not
yive approaches talking about a police state, just
making available information

programs
Residential

Colleg

_1

an experimental p
Live-in positions, r
stipend ($4000 pei
Innovative & crea
encouraged

A M 0 N T H L Y "activities
trends report" is a valuable
assessment tool in the SPAR-
MIS p a c k a g e, according to
Krasny. It details the number
of service cals per month, av-
erage response time, traffic
tickets iss'ied, cases under in-
vestigation and warrants ob-
tained.
Additional programs in the
SPARMIS package include 'peo-
ple control reports" < which 'list
such features as a "Key Name
List," which is an up-to-date
file stored in the computer nam-
ing persons previously arrested.
An investigator can gall for
an "arrest search list" of se-
lected names from the "key
name list," which focuses on
those in the file who fit a cer-
tain description; such 'as those
who drive a certain type of car,
or whose crimes in the past
have followed a particular pat-
tern.
OTHER REPORTS that help
to narrow the list of suspects
further include the "daily ar-
rest bulletin," the "Arrestee
List," and the "recidivist (peo-
ple who have been in jail re-
peatedly) report." These also
will be available on demand
through the SPARMIS compu-
ter network.
Most of the criminal identi-
fication reports can also be
sent. to federal agencies, ac-
cording to Baranski.
Funding for the raddition of
1SPARMIS to the city law en-
forcement agency. came from a
fe de r al grant administered
through the state Office of Crim-
inal Justice. The city was given
$95,000 for putting up $5,000 to-
ward the program.
ONCE THIS federal money
rusout,> however, the city
must absorb the operating costs
of SPARMIS. Krasny said he
could give no approximation o
' this cost.
Presently, the only other cities
in the state using SPARMIS are
the Saginaw, Troy, Holland and
Berian County police depart
ments. CJI spokesman Altoi
Brown said 65 law enforcement
agencies representing 80 per
cent of the population and 90
per cent of the crime in the
state will be included in the
SPARMIS network by 1980.

Iternational Harvester.
has unmatched opportunities
for people majoring in:
Accounting
Agricultural Engineering
Business Administration
Business Management
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Economics
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Technology
Finance
Industrial Engineering
Marketing
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgy
Metallurgical Engineerina
February 20
is your chance to take a look at them.
Make an appointment at the Placement Office to
see the International Harvester College Relations
Representative. He'll be here to tell you what
kind of people we're looking for, how we work
and more about the opportunities we have to offer.

Contact-Ed or Tom at 47414 or
Razelle at 30176 or apply in person,
Residential Colleege offices

DR. PAUL USLAN
Optometrist
Full Contact Lens Service
VisualExaminations
548 Church 663-2476

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