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November 20, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-20

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdav November 20 1974

aewHMHA

,w , I , a

r.

/ - WEDNESDAY
Free Pinball Nile
THURSDAY
Tequila Nile
Tequila price
No Cover Mon.-Thurs.
IT'S ONLY ROCK 'N ROLL
BUT YOU'LL LIKE IT!

341 S. Main

769-5960

ANN ARBOR

Auto plants
to close
(Continued from Page 1)
the workers' pockets."
HE SAID Chrysler may have
manipulated the shutdowns by
building more cars than it could
sell in order to save holiday
pay. He said the shutdown will
save Chrysler $19 million in hol-
iday pay normally paid far the
Christmas to New Year's Holi-
day in which the industry nor-
mally shuts down.
But Chrysler Chairman Lynn
Townsend, who on Monday said
there will be no company-wide
shutdown, said the company will
make a special Christmas pay-
ment.
The special payment, together
with state unemployment bene-
fits and the company-fund-Sup-
plemental Unemployment Bene-
fits (SUB), will give the aver-
age employe approximately the
same amount of take-home pay
he would have received had he
been eligible for holiday pay for
the eight paid holidays between
Dec. 23 and Jan. 1.
However, Fraser said this
plan will cost Chrysler just $1
million with the SUB fund be-
ing cut by $6 million.
"I THINK we have a prima
facie case for manipulation,"
Fraser said. "Either they ma-
nipulated or they are exceed-
ingly stupid."

WANTED

Liberal Arts Seniors interested
in teaching elementary
or secondary school
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
EVANSTON, ILLINOIS
will be on campus NOVEMBER 21
to discuss their MAT Program
(MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING)
This is a 15 month program leading to an
MAT degree which involves a flexible program
of graduate study and a paid teaching intern-
ship.
Schedule appointments at 763-1484

Negotiations
to reopen today
in coal strike

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
SEVERAL DEMONSTRATORS in a crowd of about 70 people that rallied on the Diag yester-
day show their support for the United Mine Workers' strike. Speakers at the rally, which was
sponsored by several local radical groups, called on the miners to vote down their tenta-
tive contract agreement.
tebrings buses to a halt

Centicore Bookshops
is pleased to
INVITE EVERYONE
TO A
RECEPTION&AUTOGRAPHPARTY
In Honor of the Publication
of the Revised Edition of
RUDOLF ARNHEIM'S
ART & VISUAL PERCEPTION4
A Psychology of the Creative Eye 44
Since its first publication in 1954, this work has established itself as aC
uniaue classic. Now Arnheim has thoroughly revised and enlarged the text4
& and added new illustrations, taking advantage of recent developments in4
his oWn work and that of others.
l"It is a book of first-rate importance, and many aspects of the psychology 49
of art are for the first time given a scientific basis. It is sure to have a
(5 far-reaching influence.'-Sir Herbert Read.
RUDOLF ARNHEIM WILL BE AT CENTICORE THURSDAY, NOV. 21 at
12:15 to 1:15 TO MEET HIS ADMIRERS AND AUTOGRAPH COPIES OF 49
HIS BOOKS4
CENTICORE BOOKSHOPS
336 MAYNARD4

By ANN MARIE LIPINSKI
Ann Arbor's Greyhound bus
station, usually bustling during
the week with University stu-
dentspurchasing tickets for
weekend destinations, was de-
serted yesterday afternoon save
for the terminal manager and
a handful of construction men
working on remodeling the de
crepit depot.
It was not the only barren
terminal: nearly 3,500 bus sta-
tions across the nation were
similarly deserted as more
than 16,000 drivers and other
employes struck Greyhound
Bus Lines in a contract dispute
Monday, shutting down the na-
tion's largest inter-city bus
system.
THE STRIKE by the Amal-
gamated Transit Union, which
includes both Greyhound and
North Star bus lines, is sure
to effect many students' plans
if it drags into the Thanksgiving
holiday.
"I'm hoping that the strike

will end by this Friday," said
Ann Arbor terminal manager
John Simpson, "but we have no
indication that it will. If it con-
tinues, I'm sure we'll have
some inconvenienced customers.
"However," Simpson added,
"Short Way bus lines is not
effected by the strike, so we;
will continue to issue in-state
tickets for Ypsilanti, Metro Air-
port and Monroe-bound passen-
gers. We can also accommodate
out-state passengers going to
Toledo or Paduca, Kentucky."
LARRY HAVARD, manager
of the Greyhound ticket desk at
the Michigan Union, echoed
Simpson's fear that students de-
pending on bus transportation
to reach their holiday destina-
tions may be left high and dry
by the strike.
"We have no way of telling
when the strike will end," said
Havard, "so we've been suggest-
ing to our student customers
that they get going on plans to
have their parents pick them
up. We've also suggested that
they check Amtrak's schedule."

Amtrak, the government-
operated passenger train ser-
vice, announced that it will try
to absorb some ofkthe traffic
affected by the strike. A Wash-
ington spokesperson for Amtrak
explained that Greyhound tick-
ets would be accepted on trains
that parallel the bus routes,
with Greyhound paying the cost
differences.
MARY JANE GILLIS, lead
agent for Ann Arbor's Amtrak
station, said although she has
been instructed to honor all
Greyhound passes, there hasn't
been a significant rise in busi-
ness.
"We've received a great many
calls from people inquiring
about our services since the
strike began, but there hasn't
been a vast increase in pas-
sengers," she noted.
"We are anticipating, how-
ever, ii slight increase this
weekend. And if the strike con-
tinues on into Thanksgiving
holiday, I'm sure we'll feel the
repercussions. But we don't
mind. We're here to serve the
public."

WASHINGTON (JP)-As the na-
tion's biggest steel producers
braced for the widening effect
of the United Mine Workers
(UMW) strike, union leaders
postponed until today reopening
of contract negotiations.
UMW President Arnold Miller
said the union's 38-member bar-
gaining council arrived in Wash-
ington late yesterday and "was
just too worn out" to resume
deliberations. The airplane
carrying council members at-
tending the funeral in Bessemer,
Ala., for UMW official Samuel
Littlefield, was delayed because
of bad weather.
UMW Secretary - Treasurer
Harry Patrick said there was
a 50-50 chance the council would
approve the tentative agree-
ment.
"The officers feel we have
gotten the very best contract
we can," he said. "The mem-
bership had a right to expect
a large increase and I think
it's in there."
Meanwhile, the strike by the
120,000 UMW miners, who dig
70 per cent of the nation's soft
coal, entered its second week
yesterday. To limit the strike
to three weeks, the union would
have to present the miners with
a tentativesagreement for rati-
fication no later than this week-
end.
APPROVAL of the bargaining
council isnecessary before the
pact can be submitted for rank-
and-file ratification, a proc Gs
that union officials say will ta a
about 8-10 days.
There was pessimism voiced
by some mine workers yester-
day.
"''his package is terrible,"
said miner Robert Koons in
Glouser, Ohio. "I think the men
were shortchanged. I'm sure
the miners will vote against it."
LARRY SAYRE, also in
Glouser, described the proposed
contract as "no good and unfair.
I think Miller should have known
better."
The death of Littlefield, UMW
district president for Alabama,
forced a three-day recess in the
council's deliberations. He was

shot when he apparently inter-
rupted a holdup attempt in his
hotel.
Industry officials have voiced
skepticism that talks will be
reopened but said there is a
possibility they might be re-
convened for minor modifica-
tions.
"WE HAVE an agreement
and it's their move," said an
industry spokesperson.
With the strike dragging on,
the nation's two biggest steel
producers took steps to offset
production problems caused by
the curtailment of coal supplies.
U.S. Steel Corp., the nation's
biggest steelmaker, said it
would start shutting down en-
tire plants if the coal strike
isn't settled by Dec. 1. Last
week U.S. Steel announced the
layoff of 13,700 employes.
BETHLEHEM Steel Corp.,
the No. 2 producer, announced
its first layoffs as a result of
the strike-175 employes at its
Sparrows Point, Md., plant
where the company said it is
banking four coke batteries.
The federal government has
maintained a hands-off policy
and made no move to hurry a
settlement. Before the strike
began, government economists
predicted a four-week coal mine
shutdown could idle about 400,-
000 workers.
UMW sources said the major
problemsnin the proposed con-
tract concern wages and vaca-
tions.
Miners would receive in-
creases totaling 15 per cent over
three years plus quarterly cost-
of-living adjustments. However,
some union officials reportedly
were unhappy with the formula
that would give miners a nine
per cent increase the first year
and 3 per cent in each of the
next two years. Sources said the
union may try to negotiate a
bigger wage hike by altering the
cost-of-living formula.

T T O'

NOV. 20
MICHIGAN THEATER
Ann Arbor 8 P.M.
Tickets on sale now
at box office
LAUREL & HARDY
1929 silent movie:
LIBERTY
accompanied by Karl Cole
at the golden voiced Barton
theatre orqan

u.n.-Japanese reiaions can
solve money ills, Ford says

TOKYO (P) - President Ford
acknowledged early today that
the United States and Japan
"h a v e had s o m e disagree-
ments" on policy matters but

ONWARD CHRISTIAN SOLDIERS
DISAPPEARING WORLDS
WAR OF THE GODS
An hour-lonq documentary focusinq on the activities of the
Summer Institute of Linquistics/Wycliffe Bible Translators
in the South American Amazon, and the frighteningly
close relationship between these linguist-missionaries and
the destruction of these. remaininq Indian socieities.
MLB Lec. Rm. 1
7:30-Thursday, Nov. 21
FREE ADMISSION

declared the two nations will
work together to help solve the
world's economic ills and avert
war.
In a text prepared for the
first formal address of an un-
precedented presidential visit,
Ford told a luncheon crowd at
the Japan National Press Club:
"WE WORKED together to
solve the problems of the cold
war. We succeeded because we
worked together. Now we con-
front . . . new and even more
complicated problems. Just as
we worked together to main-
tain today's peace, we canwork
together to solve tomorrow's
problems."
The President cited inflation,
recession and potential short-
ages of fuels and raw materials
and said:

I

To criticism by some Ameri-
cans of his decision ; to visit
Japan "when we have unsolved
problems at home," Ford said
his response is that U.S. do-
mestic difficulties "are not just
American problems but the
problems ofrthe worldas a
whole."
Just prior to his press club
appearancee, Ford held a sec-
end day of meetings with Prime
Minister Kakuei Tanaka and
other ranking Japanese offi-
cials. Yesterday he assured the
Japanese leaders they cauld
count on a steady supply of
food from thesUnited States.
HE MADE the same pledge
in his luncheon speech, vowing
that America will remain "a
trustworthy ally" that will "not
compete with our friends for
their markets." But he acknowl-
edged at two points in the text
that the United States and Ja-
pan sometimes take divergent
paths in world affairs.
"We have had some disagree-
ments, but we have remained
friends and partners," he said.
A while later, he added: "Our
alliance does not signify that
both nations subscribe To fully
identical attitudes or styles.'
Ford said the United States'
alliance with Japan means "we
clearly share a common resolve
to maintain stability in East
Asia, to help in the development
of other countries that need our
help, and to work together to
encourage diplomatic and po-
litical, rather than military, so-
lutions to world problems."

i

Nixon
ordered
pardons
(Continued from Page 1)
actions deleted."
The prosecutor's version
helps to support suspicions that
the White House transcripts, re-
leased in Nixon's defense, had
been edited to delete the most
damaging material against the
former President.
In another development at
the eight-week old trial, Judge
John Sirica dismissed the jury
early and called convicted Wat-
ergate burglartHoward Hunt's
ex-lawyer to the stand to try
and find out how a mysterious
"bombshell" memo had sud-
denly surfaced two weeks ago.
The memo, written by Hunt
in November, 1972, talks about
White House commitments to
the original burglars for clem-
ency, legal fees and financial
support.

r
r
/-
i'
i
O 1

SHRINES OF THE BLACK MADONNA
of the Black Christian Nationalist Church
College Cadre No. 2
University of Michigan/Eastern Michiqan University
presents
AN EVENING with PCN:
A Forum on Black Christian Nationalism
FEATURING
The Rev. Albert B. Cleage Jr.
(JARAMOJI ABEBE AGYEMAN)
Nat'l Chairman of the Black Christian Nationalist Movement
WED., NOV. 20'74 at 7 p.m.
Physics & Astro Bldg., rm. M 170

"America cannot solve those
problems alone. Nations can
only solve them by working to-
gether. We can workitogether
to meet the global economic
issues.

"I BELIEVE we are not just
temporary allies; we are per-
manent friends. We share the
same goals - peace, develop-
ment, stability and prosperity."
KOSHER MEAT KO-OP
Ordering Meeting
Sunday, Nov. 24
7:00 p.m.
HILLEL,1429 Hill
Information:663-4129

Violence.
divides.
God
unites.
The
community
of God.
Make it
your way.
RIAL1

NO CHARGE!

I

RECEPTION IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING AT
THE WILLIAM MONROE TROTTER HOUSE

RU61ION ANERMCANURA
Ai~um~S.UVtU~~O

A-

Ui

U

DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE

1

LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20, 3-5 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. D
"DON'T SAVE THE DREGS FOR ME: A
SOCIOTECHNOLOGICAL GLIMPSE TOWARDS 2001!"

Presents: INFLATION FIGHTERS
H SPAGHETTI (all you can eat) 99c
Cole Slaw & Garlic Bread
U -WEDNESDAY 5 to 9 p.m.-

.

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