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November 09, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-09

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low

Ro'e' Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, November 9, 197,q

l~age Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, November 9, 1 97"i

TODAY at 12 p.m.
ACU-1 Tournament
Pocket Billiards
Men and Women
Michigan Union

'U' rejects GEO's
monetary demands

MANN THEAT! ES
FOX VILLAGE
MAPIP !4{AG( SHOPPING CENTER
t ~769.1300
SPECIAL
Fri. & Sat.
MIDNIGHT
All Seats $2.00
C PANY'INCREDIBLE!
The Tme o Your[if
0IT
OF 1974
NOVEMBER 7-10
Mendelssoh p Theatre
THURS.-SAT. AT 8 P.M.; SUN. AT 3 P.M.
For ticket information call 764-0450 I
wi
TONIGHT!!
featuring works
by
Lucas Hoving
Martine Epoque
Elizabeth Bergmann
Vera Embree
and Annedeloria
UNVRIYDANCERS
at the POWER CENTER
SATURDAY, NOV. 9 at 2:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, NOV. 10 at 2:30 p.m.
Evening performances $2.50, Matinees $1.50
Tickets available at the Power Box Office -11..8 p.m.
For information call 763-3333

(Continued from Page 1) tor Allmand summed up the
sessions to date and brought situation yesterday by saying
strong re action from GO only, "It's going to be tough."
which has insisted that the pay GEO negotiator Gordon
increase not come from a tui- agreed, saying, "We'll keep on
tion hike. bargaining. Our proposals were
"Wewat wae. ," our first. Theirs were too. We'll
"W;;w:taliving a, see what they're firm on, and
former GEO president Mark what we're willing to fall back
Ferenz told the University. I o
"And we insist you go to the
legislature and demand it. We
just don't buy the argument that 4A R
we should have to fight infla-L A
tion by taking less pay."
For the first time, there was
reference to the fact that some
bers areracultamcniinb e rt n i
: of the University team mem-
bers aefuta condition
which could create friction be
tween staff and graduate em-
REFERRING TO a faculty
demand for an 18 per cent pay
hike, GEO negotiator Gordon
asked how faculty bargainers y o u th
could limit teaching fellows to
an eight per cent hike.
"You are asking for quite a (Continued from Page 1)
hefty increase for yourselves, The bulk of CAR's financial
while we are taking no in- support comes from private
crease," Gordon angrily told the contributions, which are limit-
faculty members on the Uni. ed, since CAR is still trying to
versity team. "Do you really gain tax exempt status. The
think that little of us?" literary college has made con-
With the University's reply to tributions, and Student Govern-
I the GEO economic demands, ment council has pledged mon-
both sides have now laid out ey which CAR has not yet re-
the starting pos iti ons from ceived.
which they will move toward a ALTHOUGH the non - profit
final contract. But the two sides organization is not directly con-
Ds called Spook in commemo- are far apart and the negotia- nected with the University, CAR
ther yesterday. The newborn tions could go on for several draws most of its volunteers
scales at two tons. There are more months. | from Project Outreach and its
AS IS USUALLY the case office is located at the Intro-
when negotiations have proceed- ductory Psychology House on
ed this far, the union will meet Thompson St.
to set a "contract deadline" CAR hopes to become more
next Wednesday. community - oriented. Current-
If the contract is not worked ly, 80 per cent of its volunteers
out by this date, which will are University students, but the
yO e ,robablv fall in late January or group is looking to local resi-
early February, the union will dents for further assistance.
He originally was sentenced consider "job actio,"-possibly However, lack of funds inhib-
to life imprisonment, but thed a strike, its its recruiting effort. Ideally,
sete wafe srnmenbuctoth0 But until then, the two 'sides CAR would like to set up an ad-
sentence was reduced to 10 will meet at the table twice a vertising campaign asking for
years. He would have been e1g- week, hoping to poind out an funds, volunteers, and other r#
agreement. University negotia- sources from local people.
ONCE CALLEY had exhaust-----
ed his military appeals, he be- I
gan appealing through the fed-!S
eral court system and took his
case to Judge Robert Elliott of
U.S. District Court in Columbus,
Ga., where he had been con- (Continued from Page 1) pear at the trial Monday with
fined under house arrest. , cover up the Watergate bugging' transcripts of H o u s e Armed
and break-in. I Services subcommittee testi-
SIRICA SAID he plans to keep mony and staff interviews dur-
the names of the medical con- ing 1973 hearings on the CIA
Tw o|week sultants a secret. role in the Watergate cover-uA.
As nrianti e ,..,ca ison-s-e.s me teny un

Boo!
The Denver Zoo's new resident, a baby African black rhinocer
ration of his Halloween birthday, passes the time with his mo'
male is a lightweight 85 pounds, while mam a Momba tips the
five rhinos in residence at the zoo.

EFFECTIVE NOV. 19:

Army grants Calle

(Continued from Page 1} officials at the U.S. Army Dis-
tions in connection with Calley's ciplinary Barracks and the,
bail" because he had already Army and Air Force Clemency
decided to parole Calley. , and Parole Board."
Callaway's order, freeing Cal- AN ARMY spokesperson de-
ley from further prison time,, nied that Calley received any:
was based on his authority to 1 special treatment in the Army
review court-martial sentences. secretary's early consideration
THE 10-4 appeals court vote of parole for him, weeks before'
earlier to let Calley post bond he was automatically to become
and be freed temporarily came eligible.
after 14 of the 15 judges of the The spokesperson said the
appeals court were summoned regulations require such a pro-j
secretly for an extraordinary cedure in all cases.
court session. There was no explanation as
Houston Gordon, Calley's law- to why Callaway's parole de-
yer, said after announcement of!, cision had not been made public
the appeals decision that his. earlier.
client was "elated, quite excited CALLAWAY'S statement said
and quite pleased." the Army "intends to pursue
An Army statement said Cal- vigorously its appeal of the dis-'I
laway made his parole decision trict court's decision granting
"based on a thorough review Calley's petition for habeas cor-'
of Calley's application for pa- pus because of the important
role and the recommendation of ' legal issues raised in this case."
- Except for a three-month re-
spite when he was released on
bail, Calley has been in Army ,
custody since his March 1971
...,,..f ,v, wt~o nn yninn fn

I
i
i
r
t
i
i

walk4

out

i
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f

anticl
(Continu
but avoiding
tion in the t
vately with
headquarters

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court martial conviction orl
murdering at least 22 Viet-! negotiating se
namese villagers. Usery canI
-- - vise the Pre
early invoca
Hartley Act,
D ECEMBER ers to go bat
80-day cooling
GRADUATE? is concerned
would be in
If you are graduating the union's p
in December you must the walkout.
order your CAP & An intern
GOWN no later than prepared by 1
S NOV. 1 9 at Federal Med
iation Service
UNIVERSITY CELLAR injunctions
769-7940 when usedi
coal strikes.

ipated
ed from Page 1)
direct participa-
alks. He met pri-
Miller at UMW
before yesterday's
ession.
be expected to ad-
sident against an
tion of the Taft-
requiring the min-
ck to work for an
g-off period. Usery
that such a move
neffective, harden
osition and prolong
al position paper
Usery's staff at the
iation and Concil-
says Taft-Hartley
were ineffective
in three previous

As the trial continued, Sirica Wilson seeks the testimony of
impatiently refereed a guess- former CIA Director Richard
ing-game about a single crucial Helms, former CIA Deputy Di-
word on the June 23, 1972, tape rector Vernon Walters and for-
of a White House meeting in- mer Acting FBI Director Pa-
volving Nixon and Haldeman. trick Gray.
Six days after the break-in, THE SUBCOMMITTEE h a s
the two were discussing the in- refused to make the transcripts
vestigation. A transcript pre- available. Wilson has said
pared by the prosecutor's office there are conflicts in the ac-
shows Haldeman referring to counts.
"Gemstone," the code word for
Gordon Liddy's bugging opera- Testifying for the prosecu-
tion against the Democrats. tion, Powell Moore, former
HALDEMAN'S attorney, John press aid for the Nixon re-elec-
Wilson, has disputed the tran- tion campaign, described the
script. He succeeded yesterday golf course meeting among him-
in having Alexander Butterfield, self, Liddy and then-Atty. Gen.
who was originally in charge of Richard Kleindienst within
the White House taping system, hours after the Watergate
recalled to testify about the break-in.
disputed word. Moore accompanied Liddy on
Wilson's plan was to have the mission to urge Kleindienst
Butterfield listen to that por- to get the burglars out of jail.

'r
t
t
2
t

0

.I

tion of the tape and repeat' --
what he heard, without bene-
fit of the transcript to guideKent
him.

-~~- - - ~--~

State

L ast f
Your

Chance
Picture

Jo

Get
the

s

Bursley Hall Enterprises
PRESENTS
Day ofth Jackel

__
k
f
f

w

in

SAT., NOV. 9
9 p.m.
U.M. ID REQUIRED FOR AD,

Adm. $1.00
BURSLEY W. CAFE.
MISSION

Neal and assistant prosecutor
Richard Ben-Veniste objected,
calling the task superhuman
and insisting that no one could
report the word accurately
without prolonged and concen-
trated listening.
NEAL conceded that "I couldI
not take the stand and say this
is 'Gemstone' and not 'clem-
stone' or 'gallstone."' But he
insisted that the word 'stone'
was clearly intelligible.
Sirica allowed Wilson's ex-
periment, but it turned out that
Butterfield was unable to listen
to the tape and simultaneously
reneat what he was hearing.
In a compromise, Butterfield
listened to the tape again, hand-
ling the play-back controls him-
self, writing what .he heard,
then reading it to the court. His
account did not contain the word
Gemstone.
THIS TOOK place with the
jury out of the courtroom.
Sirica concluded: "In the final
analysis, you know who's going
to be the judge of what's on
those tapes - the jury. It's as
simple as that."
In another development, Wil-
son issued a subpoena for Rep.
Lucien Nedzi (D-Mich.) to ap-

guardsmen
acquitted
(Continued from Page 1)
the acquittal:
"Given that the guardsmen
were exonerated, the fact, re-
mains that four people were
killed and many others wound-
ed: the guardsmen were given
the powers of judge, jury and
executioner.
"THE UNALIENABLE rights
that free men have were enum-
erated in the Declaration of In-
dependence: the rights of life,
liberty and the pursuit of hap-
piness. These rights were di-
rectly violated by the govern-
ment officials of the state for
(by) an overt act that required
decisions on someone's part,
someone is accountable.
"Accountability in this mat-
ter must be determined; it can-
not be brushed under the rug
by a legal technicality. We do
not want a decision of this na-
ture to set a precedent for
future action such that May 4,
1970, is re-enacted."

1915

M ich ig9anensian

Due to popular demand, the photo-
grapher has been held over through
November 75. Cal 764-0567 or stop

Graduate Scholarships
in Community Organization
Program Available
College Seniors and Graduate Students
are invited to apply for a specialized
program of graduate education and
training in:

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Organization,

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Agency Management, Administra-
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COUZEN'S FILM CO-OP
PRESENTS
G'RAND 'HOTEL
An American Classic

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