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October 04, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-04

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Page Two

THE~MICH1GAN DAILY

Friday, October 4, 1974

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CARLOS C ST NED
" l-o
just published
CENTICORE is FIRST again!
NOW IN STOCK AT BOTH STORES
Centicore Bookshop, Inc.
336 Maynard 1229 South University
____~~~ ~ -- - - ~ ~- -_- ~

Serious crime rate soars

N.Y.

interns get

(Continued from Page 1)
SAXBE suggested that some
federal crime-fighting money'
may be shifted from police
forces to improve the effeciency
of prosecutors and courts.
"I don't think there's much
h o p e of getting additional
money" from Congress, he said.
"I think we've got to look and
see how we're spending the
money we do have."
According to the FBI figures,
violent crimes of murder, rape,
robbery and assault rose six
per cent, while the property
crimes of burglary, larceny and
vehicle theft leaped 17 per cent.
In the sameaperiod a year
ago, property crimes dropped
two per cent and violent crime
rose four per cent.

THE NEW FIGURES showed
increases in all regions of the
country and in cities, suburbs
and rural areas alike.
The statistics are based on the
number of crimes reported to
state and local police officials
and submitted by them to the
FBI. Most experts believe that
the volume of crime which is
never reported to police is at
least equal to reported crime.
Broken down by crime cate-
gories, the report showed a
startling two per cent increase
in larceny, a blanket term for
purse snatchings, shoplifting and
other petty thievery.
BURGLARY ROSE 16 per cent
and vehicle theft four per cent.

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What can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
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Three months of intensive training can give you
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Since 1970, The Institute for Paralegal Training
has placed more than 700 graduates in law firms,
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If you are a student of high academic standing and
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Contact your placement office for an interview with
our representative.
We will visit your campus on
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23

Murder was up five per cent,
rape eight per cent, robbery
five per cent and assault seven
per cent.
Crime in the suburbs soared
21 per cent and in rural areas,
19 per cent
In the cities, crime rose the
most-25 per cent-in those with
populations under 10,000, but
increased only six per cent in
cities of more than one million.
THE FBI SAID that during
the same period a year ago,
95 cities reported crime de-
creases but only 17 experienced
declines this year. Gary, Ind.,
reported the largest drop-21
per cent. Among the others, St.
Louis reported a four per cent
drop, San Francisco six per
cent, South Bend, Ind., 10 per
cent, and Grand Rapids, Mich.,
13 per cent.
For all the other cities re-
cording increases, the report did
not convert the raw figures into
percentages. Among the largest
cities, the report showed New
York experienced 225,000 crimes
in the 1973 period and 234,000
this year; Chicago, 103,000 last
year and 108,000 this year; Los
Angeles, 103,000 last year and
106,000 this year, and Detroit,
53,000 last year and 60,000 this
y ear.
As usual, the South outstripped
all other regions in the size of
its crime increase. The volume
was up 21 per cent in southern
states, 15 per cent in western
Istates, 14 per cent in north cen-
tral statespand 12 per cent in
northeastern states.
Q °
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e g of supplementary *
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EDUCATIONAL CENTER "
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SPECALITS SNCE1938
.s w ejUSO brnches in Maor U S CteS

glimpse of biSess

By TOM PRESTON
Although less well known than
its Washington-based counter-
part, the New York Media In-
terns Program affords Univer-
sity students a chance to
glimpse the inner workings of
the business world.
Started only last year, the
summer program picked nine
students to work at various'
firms in the country's biggest
city.
BUSINESS WEEK magazine,3
Bantam Books, and Bank of
America were among the cor-
porations participating in the
intern program.
Carol Leslie, an LSA student
who spent the summer with Carla
Ally advertising agency, feels
the program gave her a head 1
start in shaping her career.
"It's a long overdue,practical
training program," she says.
LESLIE ROTATED positions
in the firm's art studio, media
center, and'other departments.
Like the eight other students
involved, she applied, was inter-

In terns hospital
rech agreement
(Continued from Page 1) cal equipment and personnel,
tient care issues raised by the and that this inadequacy is af-
HOA. fecting patient care at the hos-
AT A PRELIMINARY ratifi- pital.
cation session yesterday eve- A committee set up last year
ning, HOA members voted 80- to investigate the quality of
60 in favor of the contract out- care has been criticized as be-
line. While the session lacked ing too weak to alter hospital
a quorum, and the vote was un- policy.
official, HOA president Dr. Some doctors said yesterday
Robert Soderstrom conceded that the new contract's patient
that the proposed contract care provisions did not repre-
"took a lot of flak." sent a great improvement over

viewed and submitted a port-
folio.
The corporations had the final
say on which applicants were
chosen.
The New York program is an
outgrowth of the highly success-
fil Washington intern program,
which has been sending stu-
dents to workat newspaperssor
in congressional offices for the
last five years.
STEVE MARSHALL, a stu-
dent who had worked as an
intern in Washington, started the
New York business-oriented pro-
gram. Working through Univer-
sity channels to establish con-
tact with interested' firms,he
contacted 250 businesses and
found nine willing to participate.
Marshall hopes at least 20
positions, however, will be
available next summer.
Participants in the program
are paid $125 a week and are
overseen by company super-
visors who evaluate them at the
end of the summer.
After amass meeting on Oct.
7, applications will be accepted
for this year's program.

Dr. William Robison, chief
HOA bargainer in the negotia-
tions, said last night that he
didn't see the close vote "as a
threat to the contract. It should
pass by a larger majority in a
larger meeting," he said. I
Principal opposition to the
new pact centered around the
salary and patient care pack-
ages. The care"package has
been a major point of conten-
tion between the two parties.
THE PHYSICIANS have con-
tended that there is an inade-
quate supply of back-up medi-
I-

those in the old pact.
DESPITE THE criticism, So-
derstrom characterized the new
contract as 'representing "major
gains" for the HOA members.
He suggested that the work
slowdown Wednesday had been
a major incentive for the Uni-
versity to bargain seriously.

"They certainly have
now," Soderstrom said,
negotiations, "and they
move before."

moved
during
didn't

University bargainers could
not be reached for comment.
- - -

Wo1

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Pashi
FooI u"

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Use Daily Classifieds

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an(

The Institute for

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Have You Registered to Vote?
October 7 Is the Last Day
for the November 5 Election
For Your Information Regarding Voter Registration
1. All residents of Ann Arbor, not already registered, at least
18 years of age on or before November 5, 1974, should reg-
ister to vote.
2. ADDRESS CHANGE: You are allowed to vote at your previ-
ous voting place once and change your address at the polling
place on election day or you may change your address at reg-
istration places.
3. REGISTRATION TIMES AND PLACES:
MICHIGAN UNION: Friday and Monday,
1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
ANN ARBOR CITY HALL: Friday and Saturday,
8:00a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Monday 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
BOTH ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARIES:
Friday and Monday 9:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
CUNNINGHAMS in both Plymouth and Georgetown Malls

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