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October 04, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-04

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Friday;October 4, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I bge nree I

Russians test fire two
missiles into the Pacific

AP Photo
GERALD AND BETTY FORD look at a petition of "support and best wishes" signed by all
100 United States senators Wednesday night during their visit in Mrs. Ford's room at Bethes-
da Naval Hospital.
First Lady ahead of schedule
in recover from surgery

WASHINGTON () - The Rus-
sians have test fired two new
long-range, submarine-launched
missiles about 4,900 miles from
the far north Barents Sea into
the Pacific, the Pentagon an-
nounced yesterday.
They outranged the longest-
reaching U.S. missile fired from
submarines by about 2,000 nil-
es.
OFFICIALS said the Soviet
firings, presumably from a new
SDelta class submarine, were the
longest-range Soviet submarine-
launched missiles yet observ-
ed by the United States.
The tests, conducted Wednes-
day, represented the first Rus-
sian missile shots into the Pa-
cific since last winter when the
Soviets tested multiple inde-
pendently targetable warheads
(MIRV's) aboard new land-
based intercontinental ballistic
missiles.
THE PENTAGON said the
two SSN8ssubmarine-launched
missiles observed in the n e w
tests were single warheads. The
warheads landed about 500 nau-
tical miles north of Midway Is-
land, the Pentagon said.
The tests came during renew-
ed U.S.-Soviet negotiations aim-
ed at working out a long-term"
agreement to control 'tuclear
weapons. There has been a vir-
tual stalemate on the issue for
many months.
The Soviet Union had an-I
nounced that it would conduct'
rocket-firing tests into the
Northwest Pacific between Sept.
25 and Oct. 5, and warned ships
and planes to remain clear of
the area.
THE PENTAGON noted that
Tass, the Russian news agency,
announced earlier Thursday that
missile firingshave concluded
and that the area is now free
for navigation.
The Pentagon said the two
submarine-launched shots were

The Russians so far jiave!
built 10 of the new Delta class
subs, with about five of tnem
already in operation and : h e
others believed to be fitting out
or undergoing sea trials.
Several of this class of sub
are being built at a yard near
Vladivostok on Russia's Pacific
coast. Most have been construc-
ted on the Barents Sea coast
from which they may deploy
into the Atlantic.
A SSN8 missile from Delta-
type subs has been charted by
the United States previously at
4,100 miles.
The Russians also have some
34 earlier Yankee class missile
submarines with much shorter
range weapons.
So far as is known, the Rus-

The United States has been
converting 31 of its 41 Polaris
submarines to the Poseidon mis-
sile which can cary up to 14
separately targetable warheads.
THE POSEIDON missile has
a range of a little less t h a n
2,900 miles.
The United States also is de-
veloping two new Trident mis-
siles, one with a range of 4,500
miles and a later model with
a planned reach of 6,500 miles.
Under the first stage strategic
Arms Limitation SALT agree-
ment, both sides are free to im-
prove their missiles and mi sile-
firing equipment, although they
are limited in numbers of mis-
siles.
That agreement permits the
Russians to deploy up to 950
missiles in 62 sugmarines, while

the only ones conducted during their land-based weapons. They
this test series. are expected to do so.I

sians have not developed multi- the United States, because of its
ple warheads fortheir submar-- MIRV lead, is permitted up to
ine missile, as they have for 1 710 missiles in 44 submarines.

SUKKoS PARTY
Saturday, October 5
9:00 p.m.
at AE Phi, 1620 CAMBRIDGE
FOOD-DRINK-SINGING-DANCING
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
GIVEN BY
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One GIANT PLATE of
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114 E. Washington
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Beer-Cocktails
ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY
No Cover Charge Sunday through Thursday
Join The Daily Staff

WASHINGTON (A) - First Lady Betty Ford,
ahead of schedule in her recovery from surgery,
began to read her mail yesterday and was re-
ported thrilled by the expressions of concern
for her.
"She also is aware of the impact that her ill-
ness has made on people" and that thousands
of women across the country have been rushing
to seek breast cancer examinations, said her
press secretary, Helen Smith.
PRESIDENT FORD told Oval Office visitors
yesterday morning: "Betty's doing very, very,
well. She is about two or three days ahead of
what the doctors prognosticated as the rate of
recovery. So, we're very happy."
Mrs. Ford's surgeon, Navy Capt. William
Fouty, said in the latest hospital bulletin that
she was making an "excellent recuperation and
her attitude and spirits are excellent."

The doctor said that Mrs. Ford was permit-
ted to eat whatever she wanted yesterday and
was allowed to move about her suite at Be-
thesda Naval Medical Center, where she un-
derwent breast cancer surgery Saturday.
"AS WITH any post-operative patient," Dr.
Fouty said, "Mrs. Ford has not regained her
full strength, but I would describe her post-
operative course to date as uncomplicated and
her present condition as excellent."
THE WHITE House reported there have been
10,000 letters, more than 500 telephone calls and
over 200 telegrams for Mrs. Ford. And there
was even a check sent to the White House for
$5,000 for the American Cancer Society.
One spokesman for the cancer society report-
ed that Mrs. Ford's ordeal with the disease has
awakened women across the country to the
dangers they also face.

GIANT BENEFIT
GARAGE SALE
Ann Arbor Amateur Hockey Ass'n
Saturday, Oct. 5-9 a.m.-4 p.m.
1302-06 So. Forest St.
" SPORTS EQUIPMENT
0 HOUSEHOLD GOODS
0 GAMES AND TOYS
In support of a WOMEN'S COMMUNITY CENTER
for the Ann Arbor area

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 26
Friday, October 4, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a iil y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann

arbor, Michigan

48104. Subscription

rates $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

I

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre presents
A Musical Farce
based on "The Importance of Beinq Earnest" by Oscar Wilde
rig j t

INDOCHINA IS STILL
AM ERICA'S WAR!
Daniel Ellsberg-Jane Fonda
of Indochina Peace Campaign
Music by Holly Near
Saturday, October 5
8:30 P.M.
Rackham Auditorium
-FREE ADMISSION!-
Sponsored by Graduate Students Association,
Department of Political Science

I

III

RUMMAGE SALE
Sat., Oct. 5-9:30-4:30
First United Methodist Churct
120 S. State St.
WOMEN'S COFFEE HOUSE
Sat. at 8 p.m.
Guild House, 802 Monroe St.
Bring your instruments & poems
CHILD CARE PROVIDED

I

i

: ..,

rt

.

i-

Oct. 9-11,1974
8:00 p.m.

Oct. 12, 1974
7&10 p.m.

SAY,P'P9YA
j-jE ONE A0O'r
- & MGcHIegIl~s

It's no joke, really. The University

Theatre

Programs

is offering

a

Lydia Mendelssohn
Tickets $3.50 and $4.50, available
Liberty Music Shop

ITheatre
at the box office and

. ",
%- '..
ft

I

For information, contact Bruce Cameron, 764-7548

book of ten tickets for just ten dol-
lars. The book entitles you to see
whatever show you wish, and sit in
whatever seat you can get at the
time you exchange each coupon for
a ticket. The coupons can be used
all at once, e.g. ten people can use
one book for one show; or the cou-
pons can be used individually.

rw r wwir wnwrwr rw w.w

BOWLING

LEAGUE

mmmwmwm

I L

I

j

REGISTRATION

-r~mw7

A=F fly

EACH BOOK CAN BE USED FOR THE FOLLOWING POWER CENTER SHOWS:

MEN'S LEAGUE - MONDAY EVENINGS
MIXED LEAGUES - TUESDAY THRU THURSDAY EVENINGS
CO-OP LEAGUES - MONDAY & TUESDAY AFTERNOONS
DORM LEAGUES - WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY AFTERNOONS
FRAT-SOR. LEAGUES - TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY EVENINGS
OPEN BOWLING - FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
SIGN-UP BY FRIDAY OCTOBER 5 WITH A TEAM OR WITHOUT

OCT. 9-12-Edmond Rostand's
NOV. 27-30-Wm. Shakespeare's
FEB. 5-8-Donald Hall's

'CYRANO DE BERGERAC'
'PERICLES'
NEW PLAY
'THE BIRDS'

j.

APRIL 16-19-Aristophanes'

The book can also be used for the University Theatre Showcase: The Killing of Sister George, Oct.

21-23; Tht Red Lantern, Nov. 13-16; The Real Inspector Hound, Jan.
coin, Feb. 19-22; No Place to Be Somebody, Mar. 26-29.

19-21; The Last of Mrs. Lin-

I

In addition, this book
contains discount cou-
pons for Professional
Theatre Program off-
erings.
Come into the PTP

* E
' U-MI Student Il.D.- __________
' Name --_________ Phone
R f
* Addesreet__- City State .Zip!
- Pl~. kA..I..fL ....L... l .......klaIt. .. A - LA ITR+Amt 2 Rnnk0,'

The Union Lanes

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