100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 3, 1974

U a

I

Congress ups school
benefits for veterans

If you're 18 or over, live and work in Ann Arbor, or are a student
at U. of M. (even if you pay out of state tuition), you can vote
in Ann Arbor.
In recent elections Ann Arbor voters have been able to vote for
the $5 marijuana fine and rent control. In November, in addition
to electing a state representative, member of U.S. Congress, state
senator, and county commissioners from the Ann Arbor area,
voters will be considering another ballot issue, preferential vot-
ing, a method of electing Ann Arbor's mayor that insures that
the election indicates the preference of a majority of the electo-
rate. And, more ballot issues are planned for the spring.
REGISTER AT:
* CITY HALL, between 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday
(corner of Huron & 5th)
" COMMUNITY CENTER, 625 N. Main, 9-5,
Monday-Friday
" ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY, corner of William & 5th,
9-9, Monday-Friday; 9-5 Saturday
" MICHIGAN UNION, 1-4 p.m., Oct. 1, 2,3,4, &7

WASHINGTON (P)-House and
Senate conferees agreed yester-
day on a compromise bill to in-
crease school benefits for Viet-
nam era veterans by 23 per
cent.
In addition, the bill would
establish a loan program of $60
for each veteran and would ex-
tend from 36 to 45 months the
time an undergraduate could
receive benefits.
Wanted:
TEMPORARY
PARENTS
HOMES FOR
TEENAGERS
I day to 2 weeks
ANY ADULT (S)
CONSIDERED
CALL
Ozone House
769-6540

THE TOTAL cost of the com-
promise bill would be $1.48 bil-
lion.
The conferees met yesterdayI
for the first time since a dead-
lock developed last month and
a previous conference agree-
ment was rejected by the House.
Rep. Olin Teague (D-Tex.)
who lead the House conferees,
predicted President Ford would
sign the bill although Ford had
warned he would veto the
earlier conference report-with
nearly identical provisions-as
being inflationary.
, MANY VETERANS returned
to school without knowing how
much their monthly support
check would be.
A single veteran now getting
$220 a month would receive $270
monthly under the compromise
bill, with the amount effective
retroactively to Sept. 1.
A veteran with a wife would'
have benefits increased from
$261 to $321 a month. A veteran
with a wife and child would get

$366 instead of $298
also get $23 instead
each dependent over
two.

and would
of $18 for
the age of

ACCORDING TO committee
sources, the Ford administration
made a last-minute proposal to
increase benefits 20 per cent,
knock outthe loan program and
drop the extension of benefits
from 36 to 45 months for under-
graduates.
In addition, the administra-
tion wanted to delay the bene-
fits increase until Jan. 1.
In the original conference
agreement, the per-person loans
established under the special
fund would have been $1,000.
THE ORIGINAL House bill
passed earlier in the year was
for $1.1 billion and the Senate
passed a $2.076 billion bill. The
i n i t i a 1 conference produced
agreement on $1.59 billion.
The administration had want-
ed no more than a $1.2 billion
bill.

REGISTER TO VOTE !!

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
ONE UNIVERSITY senior greets President Fleming (left)
at his home yesterday afternoon during the Flemings'
annual student tea. Ms. Fleming is in the background.
Elemingshost tea

L

'A

FT-

Reinecke convicted;

(Continued from Page 1)
A NIXON-LIKE recluse sat in
a plaid upholstered chair in a
far corner swallowing from a?
china plate unfrugally piled{
with assorted edibles. "I'm
here for the cookies," he ad-
mitted. "They get better every

A FRIZZ - HAIRED youth
was telling a group about last
year's tea, when a large gay in
drag asked Mrs. Fleming how
she kept her breasts from sag-
ging, as the gay was having
the same problem. (Ms. Flem-
ing, although startled by the

BOWLING

LEAGUE

REG STRATION
MEN'S LEAGUE - MONDAY EVENINGS
MIXED LEAGUES - TUESDAY THRU THURSDAY EVENINGS
CO-OP LEAGUES - MONDAY & TUESDAY AFTERNOONS
DORM LEAGUES -WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY AFTERNOONS
FRAT-SOR. LEAGUES - TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY EVENINGS
OPEN BOWLING - FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
SIGN-UP BY FRIDAY OCTOBER 5 WITH A TEAM OR WITHOUT

resigns at
WASHINGTON (A) - A half-
hour after he resigned as Cali-
fornia's lieutenant governor, Ed
Reinecke was given an 18-month
suspended sentence yesterday
for lying to a U.S. Senate com-
mittee about an ITT financial'
pledge to the 1972 Republican
National Convention.
U.S. District Judge Barring-
ton Parker also placed Reinecke
under one month of unsuper-
vised probation.
"You were a victim of your
own selfish ambition," Parker
told Reinecke. "But under the
circumstances you have been
penalized sufficiently."
REINECKE resigned as Cali-
fornia's lieutenant governor at
12:15 p.m. EDT in letters sub-
mitted to the state assembly
speaker and president of the
California state Senate.
The maximum penalty Parker
could have imposed for the one
count perjury conviction was
five years in prison and a $2,000
fine.
Eastern Michigan
University
PLAYERS SERIES
presents
Pantomime '74
Ypsilanti High School
j Fri., Oct. 4
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 5
7:00 p.m.

It. gov.
Reinecke stood before Parker
prior to the sentencing and de-
livered an emotional speech re-
iterating his claim of innocence.
REINECKE said that he dem-
onstrated everything he could
to the -court that there was
"nothing to be covered up,
nothing to be hidden" and that
he was guilty of no wrong-
doing.
Reinecke said he was open
and candid with the FBI, the
press and the special prosecu-
tor's office, "but perhaps co-
operation with law enforcement
isn't always the best thing to#
do."
He said that all of the evi-
dence which the special prosecu-
tor's office used against him in~
the prosecution was given to!
them by himself.
"I STILL DO not feel that I
am guilty," Reinecke told the:
judge.
F. Joseph Donohue, Reinecke's
Washington attorney, said the
sentence would be appealed in
a day or two before the U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals here.
Reinecke was found guilty last
July of lying to the U.S. Senate
Judiciary Committee about his
conversations with former Atty.
Gen. John Mitchell, one of the
Watergate cover-up defendants.

year." query, managed to recommend
He expressednointerest in the Health Service).
meeting his prestigious host.
"What am I going to ask the The guests were respectful
Flemings?" he shrugged. If the and appreciative of the chance
two of them kissed on their first to meet and talk to Fleming.
date? I'm much more comfort- The tea, financed through the
able with cookies." Fleming's entertainment fund,
A fresh - shaven freshman ad- successfully managed to make
mitted ulterior motives for at- one of the University's busiest
tending. "I figure I'll get to men accessible to whatever
know Fleming real well during lowly students wanted to meet
the next four years," he schem-
ed. "Then I'll ask him for a him, and to provide a gracious,
recommendation." warm and friendly atmosphere.
Peace group holds
'tiger cage' teach-in

By CORINNE BORN THROUGHOUT the teach-in,
What appeared to be an over- IPC members volunteered to
sized fruit crate was the center stand for short intervals in the
of attention in the Fishbowl cages to demonstrate how the
yesterday when the Indochina tiny cells limi-t mobility.
Peace Campaign (IPC) conduct-! One of the women imprisoned
ed a teach-in on "tiger cages." in the cage explained to a cou-
Used throughout South Viet- ple of interested students how
nam to contain political prison- the captives in South Vietnam
oners, tiger cages are generally are shackled to the floor, often
five feet by ten feet and are resulting in paralysis of both
designed to hold five people. legs.
Although the mock tiger cage "When the p r i s o n e r s are
was constructed out of wood, eventually freed," she said,
the actual cages are made of "they have to be lifted out."
concrete and are completely
sunk into the ground. DURING THE teach-in, the
mock prisoners were happily
munching Milano cookies.

The Union Lanes

at the MICHIGAN UNION

I
-El

WE.

To all Present & Prospective English Majorrs:
1st MEETING of an
ENGLISH UNDERGRADUATE
ASSOCIATION
THURSDAY EVENING, Oct. 3-8:00 P.M.
West Conference Room, 4th Floor Rackham Bldg.
(REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED)

An IPC member explained
that many students are 3till un-
aware of the extent to which
the U.S. is still economically
involved in the support of
Thieu's regime in South Viet-
nam.
In 1971, Food for Peace, an
organization supported by U.S.
tax dollars, granted a firm in
Texas $4,000 to build 384 new
tiger cages, stated a naarby
sign.

9F if ft n w

145 /1,
ABSOLUTIE CLEARANC E
f.'
r,, BO*OK *LE
Complete, final, on all merchandise-Hardbacks, paperbacks, prints and 1975 Calendars 4Q
Discounted books are further discounted! Over V/ acre of books must go! For example,
E S LTruly an amazing book and prob-
S LFably one of the most breathtaking
MARIE DE MEDICI gifts you could give to someone.
The price is right. Supply limited. A
160 hand-tipped plates. Marvelous fold- good investment. It will certainly
outs in color. 162 x 14", comes in a cloth be a scarce and valuable book in
slip case. Originally published by Abrams, the years to come.'
the book is no longer available in New_
York. Text by Jacques Thuillier with cata-
log and a Documentary History by Jac- Orig. Publisher's Price $150.00
ques Foucart. Printed on the finest laid
$ paper in a short edition. Originally pub- Reg. Discount Price . . $79.954.
fished at $150.04.
iUTedKatFU1C BORDERS SPECIAL ... $ 63.96
I DISCOUNT BOOKS ARE FURTHER REDUCED 20%

' zarct ~
m Nikkorm

Nikkorint FTN

I'

CHROME w/50 mm f 2 lens
Quarry's regular $311.65
SAV E $42.15
SALE PRICED $26950
Nikkormat FTN
CHROME w/50mm f 1.4 lens
Quarry's regular $383.00

SAYE $53.50
SALE PRICED

$32950

f

TWO
NIKON MOUNT LENS
SPECIALS

Nikkormat FTN
CHROME w/55mm f 3.5
Macro-N ikkor lens
Quarry's regular $429.00
SAYE $44.50
SALE PRICED 8450

...

I

90-230mm f 45
Vivit ar. (fully automatic)
35mm f 2.8 (ONLY 5 TO SELL) ZOOM LENS
(automatic)
'fide Angle L~ens j
Quarry's regular $149.99
Quarry's regular $69.95 SAYE $20.00
SAVE$25.0$4495 S PC 9
SEPRED$ 95SALE PRICED$1 99

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan