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October 03, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-03

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Thursday, October 3, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, October 3, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W. Germany claims
model amnesty plan

I

The University
Artists and Cra

'I

of Michigan
iftsmen Guild

BONN, Germany (P) - West the late 1960s, attributed partly
German conscientious objectors to the American war in Viet-
care for the ill and handicapped, nam. In 1967, 5,963 West Ger-
work in ambulances and rescue mans applied for conscientious
services and protect the environ- objector exemptions, but by
ment in a project that could 1972 applicants neared 34,000.
serve as a model for President "The Vietnam war certainly
Ford's amnesty program. played a role in the increase,
"Most West Germans believe but it's also been modish among
that as long as there is a draft, young people to discount mili-
there must be equality of serv- tary solutions and proclaim
ice for all young men," said 'Better red than dead,"' Har-
Manfred Harrer of the West rer said. "Another factor is the
German Labor Ministry, which German past. Because of this,
administers the conscientious many want nothing to do with
objector program initiated 18 the military."
years ago. "America may have
something to learn from our ex- A 39-YEAR-OLD legal spe-
periences." cialist, Harrer believes West
FORD HAS offered amnesty German public opinion has
to draft evaders and deserters changed decisively in favor of
from the Vietnam war era in civilian service in the last two
return for an oath of allegiance years.
to the United States and for "s-
working up to two years in pub- trust. Some claimed these
lic services such as national
health or safety. young men were shirkers," he
About 30,000 West German said. "But now the public is
Abou 30,00 Wst Grmanaware of what they do. Because
youths will avoid the draft this aaeo htte o eas
year by establishing their status of labor shortages, some hos-
as conscientious objectors To pitals could not operate with-

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PRESENTS:
The 2nd Annual
COMMUNITY ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR

1

WHERE?

Farmer's

Market, Ann Arbor

:!
i

WHEN? Sunday, October 6, 1:00-7:00 p.m.
WHAT? 100 Artists and Craftspeople
demonstrating and selling their work
WHO? Open to everyone, no admission charge
This will be the Guild's last outdoor show of the 1974 season. One hundred
artists and craftspeople from all over Michigan will be at the Farmer's
Market to sell their work. Come to the fair to learn as well as to buy;
many participants will be demonstrating their techniques. Come watch the
potters at their wheels; the weavers at their looms, and the artists at their
easels.

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY senior Horace Jones, 25, consider
Blue University of Michigan notebook. Our long-standing Big T
as a novelty item. Campus bookstore employees report that t

AP Photo
's buying a genuine Maize and
Ten rivals ordered the books

CUBAN HEALTH CARE

MD maintai ns s
ended medicali
CHICAGO (YP) - The socialist' cated pregnancies. Young noted
revolution in Cuba has resulted that at Cook County hospital,
in universal high quality medi- one-third of the women have
cal care for the Cuban people, 'seen a doctor only once during
says an American physician just pregnancy.
back from a month's visit there. Young reported infant mortal-
Dr. Quentin Young said health ity down to 27.8 per 1,000 live
care has had a high priority in births from an estimated 65 per
Cuba since the revolution in 1,000 in 1959. He also reported
1959 and is considered a social total immunization against po-
right, available to everybody lio, a reduced diptheria rate, no
free. He said Cubans "have malaria and no tetanus except
gone a long way toward con-jamong the elderly.
quering that which was un- As a result, Young said, death
conquerablel""statistics -in Cuba are begin-
YOUNG WAS ONE of a group ning to resemble those in the
of 16 U. S. medical personnel United States and Europe where

he notebooks are selling well. substitute for military service, out these men."
they will be assigned by the F
Bonn government to 16 months Franz Hebig, a 23-year-old
of civilian service duties, com- conscientious objector serving
pared with 15 months served by in a Roman Catholic - operat-
military recruits. ed hospital in Bonn, said: "I
Their starting pay is about $2 believe no one should be forced
ocialists a day plus meals. Many will to be a soldier, but I also be-
have to finance their own living lieve young people have a duty
3quarters. Otherwise, they re- leeyugpol aeadt
ceive the same welfare benefits to serve their community."
Ias army recruits.
e LIKE THE Ford proposal, the
West Germany civilian service SHORT or LONG
in Cuba. But he said Cubans program has provoked contro- HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASE
"smoke like crazy." There is no versy. There is grumbling from
antismoking campaign though conscientious objectors about DASCOLA
cigarette packages contain low pay and being forced to BARBERS
warnings about smoking. serve one month longer than
One continuing problem is soldiers in menial, make-work ,RMVILAGE-761 2733
gastroenteritis, caused by im- assignments. E. LIBERTY-668-9329
pure water. The antiquatedo s There was a dramatic upsurge E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354
sanitation and water system has W Germany during
been responsible and while the
disease is now adequately
treated, it is not yet prevent-
able.

Also: ART AUCTION

11:

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Beginning at 4 p.m. the Guild will be holding an auction. Over 100 dif-
ferent art objects will be auctioned off. Come join in the festivities!
Artists and craftspeople interested in participating in the f a i r should
contact the Guild, 2N Michigan Union, 668-7884, no later than Friday,
Oct. 4 at 5 p.m.

II

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145E

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Daily Official Bulletin

who visited Cuba under spon- near lsUase ana cancer raze Day calendar
sorship of the U.S.-Cuban Health the highest toll. Thursday, October 3
Exchange. They plan to report YOUNG ALSO said venereal WUOM: Geo. Mavros, Deputy
on their trip at a meeting of disease is under control. He Pree.iat Natr, F recluWAffasof
the American Public Health As- noted that while there is more D.C., 10 am.
sociation in New Orleans at '-sexual freedom, Cubans are AAUW Book Sale: Union Ball-
the end of the month. likely to have only one sex part- room, 10 am-8:30 pm.
Young heads the Department ner and are not promiscuous, Ctr. "Japanese Studies: Geo.
Yug tNace, "U.S.-Japan Cooperative Pro-
of Medicine at Cook County although many relationships are gram in Biology with Hiroshima &i
Hospital and is a founder and extramarital. Other Matters," Commons Rm.,
past president of the Medical Young reported that abortions LNava al, noo arineEng.:nJ..A.
Committee for Human Rights. are freely available and birth Borchardt, "An Introduction to
He said Cuba was left medi- control devices are cheap and Sewage Treatment Technology," 311
cally impoverished when 60 readily available. He said Cu- w. Eng., 3:i0 pm.
per cent of its 7,000 doctors left ban physicians do not enthus~ voor Perceptie Onderzoek. "The
followingthe revolution and the iastically promote birthcontrol Netherlands," 1057 MI 3:45 pm.
medical school lost 85 per cent pills because of reported side Ctr. Early Childhood Develop-
of its faculty. effects. ment, Education: Leslie Cohen, U.
But he said the emphasis on He said there appears to be schrlin i an isualMemory,"
health care led to a crash pro- no alcoholism or drug addiction Bio-Statistics: P. v. sukhatme,
gram for replacements. And "Statistics in Nutrition Studies,"
while there is still a shortage of THE MICHIGAN DAILY vaughn Aud., SPH, 4 pm.
Volue LXXV No 25Nuclear Seminar: A. VanderMo..
nurses, there are now 8,000 doc- VOlume LXXXV, No. 21 len & K. Hecht, "Recent Michigan
tors - half of them woment- Thursday, October 3, i97d a'drLi) Experiments and Alpha:
and btterdistribution so that at edited~ and managed by studentsathUnvriyoMcig.Nes Particle Sectroscopic Factors in s, d
and better dthe University of Michigan. News Shell Nuclei," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4
Havanna has fewer doctors and phone 764-0562. Second class postage pm.
some smaller cities have more. paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Geology & Mineralogy: Distin-
creditedblock .Published d a i l y Tuesday through gihdLcueSre:D.Aei
Young credited block organiz- Sunday morning during the Univer Dreima ectureSoiest.Dr Otaios
ations with helping to improve sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann London, "The stratigraphy of the
health care and said the com- Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription Last Glaciation in Southwest On-
mittees have created "an enor- rates: $10 by carrier (campus area); tario," 1528 CC Little, 4 pm; coffee
moos health education system," $1 oca m ai ichi andeh at 3:30 pm.
mous ~~~~~~~$2 non-local mail (other states and Woe' tde:Fl eis
the United States might foreign.r session published TuesJanie's Janie, Aud. C, Angell, 8 pm.
emulate. Sme eso ulse us General Notices
day through Saturday morning.
THEIR PROGRAMS have re- {Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier Employment Workshops for Pro-
sulted in pregnant women aver- 'campus area); $6.00 local mall fessionals in Tech. Fields will be of-
aging 6.5 visits to a physician 1 (Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non- fered, Oct. 15, 22, & 24 by Engineer-
efore delivery com local mail (other states and foreign). ing Society of Detroit; registration
bfr deiey i nopli-: _______________ forms available at CP&P, 3200 SAB.

STILL AMERICA'S WAR
LET US FINALLY END IT
What has been done? What can be done?
HEAR
Dan Ellsberg Jane Fonda
of Indochina Peace Campaign
Music by HOLLY NEAR
SATURDAY, OCT. 5-8:30 P.M.
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
free admission
Graduate Student Association, Dept. of Poll Sci

proudly presents from Detroit
LRA~ER'S
,R~hERS

HC)7

JAZZ

FLIP JACKSON QUARTET
TH U RSDAY-FRI DAY-SATU RDAY
9:30 P.M.-1 :30 A. M.
-NO COVER-
HURON HOTEL & LOUNGE
124 Pearl-Ypsilanti
Phone 483-1771

3
C

Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays
Throughout all October
Rock out f rom 9:00-2:00
Where it's only rock 'n roll
but you'll like it ..
(it's only $1 cover too!)
THE SCENE 314S. Ma

in

---I

111

Ili

Kosher Meat Ko-op
Organization Meeting
6 October, Sun ay
7:30 p.m. at Hillel
1429 Hil-663-4129

ENTERTAINMENT WANTED

A

( ti_ __ __ .. _ __

Blues, Jazz, and Folk

Artists

apply
DOO LEY'S

in person at
310 Maynard St.
994-65 50

__ C. L THIS BOOK
"I grew up copping change from my mother's purse. In college I stuck a transistor in r
the telephone cord to get free calls. Then, I entered the big time, became an army (
officer, and was trained in advance lying, cheating, and stealing, until finally in disgust
I turned honest. It was an abandoned act of rebellion, and lo, it freed me. I was just4
F barely in the army after that.
"If you steal, you're in the army. That's my perspective.
"Popular theft is largely a matter of who's fair game. In parlous times everybody is, to
somebody. In the 1770's American rebels righteously robbed loyalists and vice-versa. 41
During the same period in stable Indian tribes theft was practically unknown within the 41
tribe (Encouraged sometimes outside the tribe). Are booksellers outside the tribe?1
"Most bookstores operate very near the financial edge. Reportedly one-third of all4
' bookstores lose money, run at a loss. They're in the busines for love, not money. I ;
know enough about bookmaking, selling and using to assert that books are a fantastic

TAKE THE
MAGAZINE
AND RUN.
Or walk. Or crawl (if it's Monday). Whichever you
do, you'll be a smarter person for owning this
76-page collection of penetrating articles, written by
some of the top experts in music today.
Paul Hemphill on country music, Robert Palmer on
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I ---=--- ~---.----------------- - --

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