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September 17, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-17

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Tuesday, September 17, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAM'

Page Three

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page ThreeMIIIMINNIINI II I

Anti-busing clashes
continue in BostonI

HAGUE NEGOTIATIONS CONTINUE

Terrori

BOSTON (A') - Eighty-seven
black children walked quietly
off school buses into South Bos-
ton High School yesterday, but
antibusing demonstrators in the
white, Irish neighborhoods
around the school skirmished
with police.
Officials in the mayor's of-
fice reported 15 arrests all for
disorderly conduct.
Throughout the morning, offi-
cers cordoned off the a r e a
around the school and broke up
groups as they congregated.
Some of the marchers carried
signs and an effigy of a black
person.
AT ONE POINT, a crowd of
about 150 white teen-agers threw
rocks and .bottles at motorcycle
policemen who dispersed them
about two blocks from the high
school.
Police Commissioner Robert
IRA kills
judges
in Belfast
BELFAST (P) - Irish Repub-
lican Army terrorists assassi-
nated two Northern Ireland
judges in their homes today and
a business executive was re-
ported killed by a bomb at his
factory.
The two judges shot to death
in Belfast were Roger "Rory"
Conaghan and Martin McBirney,
one Roman Catholic and one
Protestant accused by the Irish
Republican Army of collaborat-
ing with the British. The provis-
ional IRA wing claimed it or-
dered the killings.
Politicians and legal figures
condemned the slayings, a n d
courts all over the province
were adjourned to honor tne two
slain judges.
IN POMEROY, County Ty-
rone, west of here, informed
'sources said a booby trap bomb
went off when businessman
Michael McCourt entered his
office and he was killed.
The three deaths raised to
1,063 the official death toll in
five years of violence in the
province.
Police officers said Conaghan,
54, a judge since 1965, was shot
by a lone gunman when he an-
swered a knock at his front
door at breakfast time.
dHE WAS shot through the
heart and died almost instant-
ly," one source said.
McBirney, 56, was shot by 'a
gunman who burst into the kit-
chen of his home in nearby
Belmont Road as he was cook-
ing breakfast, police said.
McBirney was a leading pro-
secutor before he was appoint-
ed a magistrate in 1969. He was
a former chairman of the pro-
vince's Labor party and made
an unsuccessful race for the
British Parliament 10 years
ago.
"BOTH MEN were warned
time and again that they were
part of the British war ma-
chine and as such were liable
to suffer the consequences,"
said an IRA statement on the
two judges.
The Northern Ireland Civil
Rights Association, a Catholic-
dominated group, declared:
"Such killings never advance
any political cause one iota,
but can only have the effect of
opening up yet again the flood-
gates to sectarian murder and
bestiality."

diGrazia ordered bars and liq-
nor stores in South Boston clos-
ed until 4 p.m. "We want to,
minimize the number of out-'
side factors involved in the
existing emotions," a spokes-
man for the mayor's office said.
When school began yesterday,
the third under a court-ordered
desegregation plan, School De-
partment officials said about 110
of the 380 blacks assigned to
South Boston High showed up1
for classes, but later they re-
duced the figure to 87. On
Friday, 25 attended.
OF THE 1,031 whites assign-
ed there, the School Depart-
ment said 55 went to school to-
day.
Elsewhere in the city, s -haols
opened this morning without
any reported incidents.
Police said "substantially
more than the 400 police assign-
ed to South Boston Friday"
would be put on the streets yes-
teday in the neighborhood,
which has put up most of the
resistance so far to having black
children attend previously all-
white schools.
Antibusing leaders vowed to
continue their boycott, but city
and state officials said they ex-
pected progress in the integra-
tion program.
ABOUT A THIRD of public
school students were absentj
when classes opened last Thurs-
day and Friday under the fed-
eral order to integrate through 1

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (YP)
-Japanese terrorists freed two
women h o s t a g e s from the
French Embassy yesterday, but
officials said "difficult decis-
ions" lie ahead in negotiations
for the nine remaining captives,
all men.
A police spokesperson said the
release of the two 22-year-old
women was the result of nego-
tiations between the three ter-
rorists and the Dutch Justice
Ministry.
& Dutch Premier Joop den Uyl
said "a matter of special con-
cern" was that the three ter-
rorists and the hostages, includ-
ing Ambassador Jacques Sen-
ard, were getting tired and ed-
gy as the siege neared the end
~ ~ of its fourth day.
s "THERE ARE so many un-
certain factors in this that I
cannot tell you concretely," he
said in a television interview.
"I have a feeling that in the
next 24 hours a series of very
difficult decisions will have to;
be taken by us."
The gunmen freed the women
hostages earlier yesterday after
Iholding them and the others
since Friday to gain the release
of Yutaka Furuya, a colleague
in Japan's Red Army, the group
responsible for the massacre of
26 persons at Tel Aviv airport
in May, 1972.
Shortly before the women
were released, a move describ-
ed as a break-through in the
negotiations, a Boeing 707 land-
ed at Amsterdam airport. A
snokesperson for the D u t c h
irline Transavia said one of
its crews volunteered to f 1 y
Furuya and the gunmen )ut of
AP Photo the country if a deal is reach-
ed on the remaining hostages.
boyfriend FURUYA WAS arrested out-
e mother sidegParis seven weeks ago on
te1 charges of plotting to kidnap
who are leading Japanese in Europe to
gain the release of jailed Jap-

sts release two
anese revolutionaries. AUTHORITIES QUOTED the
The French government flew women as saying the gunmen
him to Amsterdam airport Fri- didn't mistreat any of the nost-
day evening, but refused to ags. They said the terrorists
meet any other demands, in- asked for food and cigarettes,
ceding ay $1millionransom, and were given cartons of to-
mato soup, cheese sandwiches
The women freed were Bern- and soft drinks.

adine Geerling, the embassy
telephone operator, and Joyce
Fleur, the ambassador's secre-
tary, both 22. They were tak-
en away in ambulances and re-
ported in "favorable condition
considering the circumstances."

The nine men seized w i t h
the women were the ambassa-
dor, two embassy staffers, an
embassy chauffeur, a visiting
French businessman, his chauf-
feur and three unidentified per-
sons.

r<'

busing. School buses were ston-
ed and police lined bus routes
to protect black children com-
ing into one section of t h e
city.
Despite the troubles, s c h a o
officials said teaching was go-T
mng on in all schools. Attend-'
ance was normal in some areas
and there were no problems o
reported in the classrooms. m
A rally against busing drew
hundreds of cars on Sunday in
South Boston, the middle class,
mostly Irish Catholic area wherer
the boycott was most effective.
Police said Sundy they would'
not allow a South Boston "moth-
ers march" planned yesterday,
because of potential for vio-
lence.

Mis 've been a beautiful baby
'he new Miss United Kingdom, Helen Morgan, poses for photographers with her
Chris Clode. British newspapers disclosed that Morgan, although unmarried, is th
f a 15-month-old son. She gets to keep her title since the rules exclude women
married, but there are no clauses banning motherhood.

The Editorial Staff of
I ° THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PAPERS IN WOMEN'S STUDIES
Invites You to an
QOPEN MEETING0
Wednesday, Sept. 18 at
4:00 p.m. in 1058 LS&A
We are looking for new Editorial
Board Members
Refreshments No experience necessary
MODIFY YOUR
UNDESIRABLE BEHAVIORS
IF YOU WANT TO-
1) Lose Weight
2) Stop Cigarette Smoking
3) Increase Study Skills
4) Stop Biting Finger Nails
5) Exercise More Frequently
6) Meet More People
7) Complete Your Dissertation
8) Change Other Minor Maladaptive
Behaviors
Students in Psychology 414 (Advanced Labo-
ratory in Behavior Modification) in Coopero-
tion with the Institute of Behavior Change,
will work with you in changing your undesir-
able behaviorsw.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION
CALL: 663-0195
555 S. FOREST, SUITE 43
Dr. James V. McConnell-Director of Research
Dr. Chauncey Smith-Director of Clinical Services

Subscribe to The Daily
NOW IN STOCK
TEXAS INSTRUMENT
CALCULATORS

Old World
Wisdom

MAYOR WHITE last week or-
dered that persons gatheredt
near schools in groupsoftmre
than three be arrested. Twenty-
one persons were arrested, two:
policemen were injured and 11
black children were hurt, none'
seriously, in bus stonings. One
bus carrying white students was
hi't with stones thrown by black
youths.
Thomas Atkins of the Nation-
al Association for the Advance-
ment of Colored People (NAA-
CP) urged on Sunday that par-
ents send t h e i r children to
school. Last week he suggested
black parents worried a b o u t
safety keep children home, but!
he said planning now seems
, more adequate to the task of
enforcing the court-ordered ce-
segregation."
THE BUSING plan was order-
ed in June by a federal judge!
who ruled the Boston School
Committee "intentionally segre-
gated schools at all levels." He
ordered cross busing of 18,200
of the school system's 94,000 pu-
pils and assigned 27,000 others
to new schools.
State Commissioner of Edu-
cation Gregory Anrig said Sun-
day he felt the school opening
had gone well. He acknowledged
some difficulties but said: "It is
going to be different and the
pride of this city is going to
prevail"'

TI-SR-10
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cooking and hospitality from
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photos, diagrams and ius-
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-Rolling Stone
HANDMADE
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by DREW and LOUISE LANGSNER
Size 81" x 11". Cloth $8, paper $4: now at yourbookstore, or send check or
money order to HARMONY BOOKS, a division of Crown Publishers, Inc.
419 Park Ave South. New York. N. Y 10016

w

Michigan Union Billiard

FREE INSTRUCTIONS
POCKET BILLIARDS
TONIGHT 7-9 p.m.

REDUCED RATES
FOR COUPLES
TODAY 11 a.m.-12 mid.

OPEN 11 a.m. Mon.-Sat.; 1 p.m. Sun.

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Jacobson's open Thursday and Friday evenings until 9:00 P.M.
Saturday until 5:30 P.M.

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
:!":::":::"":::J' :i i':r :''':1::"':t:'" :":f::::J:Tf"J.f.'t::::":"":":":''":"t:.::" :::"":". :::": :

Home Cooking
Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05
Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
jelly-$1.50
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1,90

Is Our Specialty
Specials This Week
Beef Stroqanoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Goulash
Eau Rolls
Home-made Soups (Beef,
Barlev, Clam Chowder, etc.)
Chili, Veqetable Tempura
(served after 2 p.m.)
Fried Rice with Sausaqes
and Veqietables
Spaqhetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice

Tuesday, September 17
Day Calendar
WUOM Lecture: presentation dis-
cussing economic issues facing Ger-
ald Ford, 91.7 FM, 10 am.
Engineering: E. Sickafus, Ford
Motor, "Auger Characterization of
Surfaces - A Basis for Metallurgi-
cal Investigation," 3201 E. Eng., 11
am.
Career Planning & Placement
Meeting: Conf. Rm. 4, 5 League,
1,2,3,4 pm.
Engineering: college standing
committee, Dean's Ofc., 3 pm.
Naval Arch., Marine Eng.: E. Karl-
son, U.S. Maritime Admin., "The
Effect of Oil Pollution & Hazard-
ous Materials Considerations on In-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 11
Tuesday, September 17, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).
- f

land Barge Transportation," 311 W.
Engin., 3.:10 pm.I
Aero space: A. Mikolhaczak, Pratt
& whitney Aircraft, "Recent Pro-
gress in Fan & Compressor Aer6-
dynamic Research & Engine Noise
Reduction," 107 Aerospace Bldg.,
4 pm.
Architecture: W. Muschenheim,
slides, "Architecture of India & Af-
ghanistan," 2104 Arch & UP Bldg.,
4 pm.
Modern Dance Class: Trotter
House, 7 pm.
Future Worlds: planning session,
UAC office, 2nd fIl., Union, 8 pm.
Music School: S. Raab, organ, Hill
Aud., 8 pm.

I

FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE 4

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SUN. 9-8
CLOSED MON.
TUES.-SAT. 8-8
1313 SO UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

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MICHIGAN MEN
Their Clot hingi Needs

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