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September 17, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-17

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Pag'e' Two .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 17, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, September 17, 1 9~

I

FUTURE WORLDS LECTURE SERIES
WILL BE BACK THIS WINTER
if you want to. help plan the Lecture series this
w i ter, come to our meetings-Tuesday nights in
the U.A.C. offices, 2nd floor Michigan Union-
763-1107
First Organizational Meeting:
TUES., SEPT. 17-8:00 P.M.

2ND DISTRICT RACE
Reuther calls in top Dems

(Continued from Page 1)
future.
THE REUTHER campaign
has definitely tried to enlist the
direct help of McGovern and
Humphrey. A Kennedy aide in-
dicated the senator has been
approached to visit the area.
McGovern, facing a reelec-
tion challenge in his own state,
has "not firmed up his sched-
ule" in regard to campaign ap-
pearances for other candidates,
according to his aides.
However, Reuther has asked
the 1972 presidential contender
to stump with him. "The thing
is still up in the air," Reuther
worker Linda DiPietro said yes-
terday. "But we have talked to
McGovern."
REUTHER organized McGov-
ern's presidential campaign in
Massachusetts - which, along
with the District of Columbia,
were the only areas the South
Dakotan captured in 1972.
Kennedy's appointments sec-
retary yesterday indicated that
Kennedy plans "to set a date"
to come to this congressional

district, depending on when the'
legislative session ends.
Former presidential candi-
date Humphrey "has talked
with Reuther," an aide said
yesterday. Nonetheless Hum-
phrey's top priority will be to
assist Minnesota candidates, the
senator's assistant added.
CURRENTLY Reuther is wag-
ing a co-campaign with Dr. Ed-
ward Pierce against Esch pend-
ing the outcome of a reco:int
of their August primary. In that
contest Reuther edged Pierce
by a very narrow margin.
Unofficial r e c o u n t results
show Reuther leading Pierce ty
over 130 votes and a high-level
worker in the doctor's camp
last night conceded "we're not
going to win this thing."
Apparently despite the air of
a joint campaign, Reuther has
lined-up the outside Democrats
without consulting the Pierce
workers. "We don't kn:w any-
thing about them (Mondale and
Udall) coming," a Pierce aide
said.
EVEN WITHOUT help from

his party's big guns, Reuther
should fare better against Esch
than did the previous Demo-
cratic challenger Marvin Stem-
pien of Livonia.
In 1972, Esch downed Stem-
pien by a comfortable margin
in what was expected to be a
tight race.
Reuther, however, can easily
improve on Stempian's showing
in the University section of the
district. Although not drawing
well locally in the primary,
Reuther indicated he will in-
tensify efforts to capture the
student vote.
LIKEWISE, he should garner
the labor backing that went to
Stempien two years ago. As the
nephew of late United Auto
Workers union President Walter
Reuther, he has a strong family
tie with labor.
Still, Esch is an incumbent,
which gives him a headsta: t on
name recognition among the
voters. And the Republican has
been elected to four consecu-
tive terms.

Ford reveals amnesty plan

CARE.ER

SENIORS and

PlanninGRAD STUDENTS
Placement
Employment After Graduation?

Grad School? or .

What?

0

Come find out how the services of
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
can help you get where you want to go.
COME TO A
REGISTRATION MEETING
Tues., Sept. 17-Wed., Sept. 18
eeings will be held every hour on the hour begining
nrbon. Last meeting starts 4:00 p.m.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Conference Rooms 4 & 5

(Continued from Page 1)
said the 24-month requirement
can be reduced "for mitigating
circumstances."
FOR MEN already convicted
or punished for desertion or
draft evasion, Ford established
a nine-member clemency board
to review their cases "as equit-
ably and as impartially as is
humanly possible."
Men now in prison will have
their cases reviewed first, and
officials said their confinement
would be suspended as soon as
possible.
Those who reach an agree-3
ment for alternate service, but
fail to fulfill its terms will be
subject to prosecution on the
original charges, officials said,
and those who fail to meet the
Jan. 31 deadline will remain
subject to arrest and prosecu-
tion.
FORD designated an early
critic of the war, former Repub-
lican Senator Charles Goodell:
of New York, to head the clem-
ency board.
Ford described the main pur-
pose of the program as "the
reconciliation of all our people
and the restoration of the es-
sential unity of all our people
and the restoration of the es-
sential unity of Americans with-
in which honest difrerences of
opinion do not descend to angry
discord and mutual problems
are not polarized by excessive
passion."
REWARD!!
$1W50 reward offered
for a n y information
leading to the recov-
ar~in. M P~MA1 7MA {'1ih

"MY SINCERE hope," he
added, "is that this is a con-
structive step toward a calmer
and cooler appreciation of our
individual rights and ressponsi-
bilities and our common pur-
pose as a nation, whose future
is always more important than
its past."
TO BE ELIGIBLE for clem-
ency, deserters would have to
have committed offenses be-
tween Aug. 4, 1964 - the date

of the Senate's Tonkin Gulf Re-
solution - and March 28, 1973
-the day the last U. S. combat
soldier left Vietnam.
Clemency will not be consid-
ered for deserters or evaders
who face other, unrelated
charges, officials said.
Ford's proclamation ddid not
specify the types of jobs under
the alternate service, but offic-
ials said they would be the same
as those filled by conscientious
objectors in the past.
" s )

uierwcais to uioiiize:

Among the Democrats, House Speaker Carl Albert said he

AP Photo
just a peck
Getting close to the animals is obviously one of the advan-
tages enjoyed by visitors at the petting zoo of the Eastern
States Exposition in West Springfield, Mass. Here Curt Oul-
met snuggles up. to an emu.
Right, left condemir
Ford amnesty plan
WASHINGTON UP) - Public reaction to President Ford's ai
nounced plan for granting conditional amnesty to Vietnam we
resisters was mixed yesterday. Some conservatives blasted tl
move, asserting that those who'dodged the draft deserved r
leniency. Liberals claimed it was far too harsh.
Congressional reaction to Ford's plan was mixed.
Senate Republican whip Robert Griffin of Michigan haile
it is a courageous, compassionate move and House Republ
can leader John Rhodes of Arizona said it should have brow
support in Congress.

(Continued from Page 1)
dealing with University mus-
cle - particularly from the
President Robben Fleming who
is considered one of the fore-
most labor arbiters in the coun-
try.
The struggle between the
unions began early this year
when the secretaries organized
into the Concerned Clericals for
Action (CCFA). Its executive
branch, made up of 37 indi-
viduals agreed by a four vote
margin to have UAW as the
clerical union. Since the vote
was so close, some of the
AFSCME supporters split from
the group and began campaign-
ing for another election.
SINCE THAT time, supporters
of both unions have engaged in
much heavy campaigning to win
votes. AFSCME organized edu-
cational workshops to inform
women on campus of the impor-
tance of unionization, and the
UAW called on some of its
more influential members-not-
ably Vice President Douglas

accepting the President's leadership but added, "I don't kno
Fraser, to rally the clerical's what he is going to do, to tell the truth." Sen. Majority lead
support. Both unions have also Mike Mansfield said he would give full support to the progra
been campaigning on a person- Sen. James Allen, (D-Ala.), said the action was unfair to tho
to-person basis. who served in Vietnam.
The unions filed petitions with Atty. Gen. William Saxbe said he estimates. that 2,500 dra
the Michigan Employment Re- resisters will take advantage of the conditional amnesty off
lations Commission (MERC) af- and that a larger number of deserters will do so.
ter establishing the necessaryadta agrnme o eetr ild o
show-of-interest the commission QUESTIONED BY reporters as he left a congressional hea
requires. When the clericals go ing, Saxbe said Ford's plan "goes right down the line with th
to the polls this week, they will I recommendations submitted by the Justice and Defense depar
have the option of voting either ments."
for AFSCME, the UAW, or no John Stang, commander in chief of the Veterans of Forei
union at all. Wars, said in Washington that Ford's action "does a gross in
Clerical workers at the Flint 1 justice to those who served honorably, those who died and re

campus voted yesterday and
the clericals at Dearborn will
vote today. Tomorrow secretar-
ies North Campus will vote,
followed by their co-workers at
University Hospital on Thurs-
day, with more ballotting at the
Michigan Union Friday, and at
the League next Monday.
Both the technicians and pro-
fessional and administrative'
workers are also seeking a un-
ion. The technical workers are
expected to vote sometime in
October.

ceived wounds, and those who were so long imprisoned."
Stang said the veterans do not want revenge. "All we as
for is justice," he said.
STANG took issue with the idea of public serviceJobs. "Wh
provide jobs for those who would not serve when the unemplo
ment rate for the young Vietnam veterans is over 10 per cent?
he asked.
On the other side. Mary Ramberg of the Mississippi chapte
of the American Civil Liberties Union, said those who evade
service "have committed no crimes. And yet the justice they'r
getting is really a mock trial outside the judicial system. It'
just not enough."
Steven Trimm, 25, a former Chatham, N.Y., resident no
living in Hamilton, Ont., fled to Canada in 1969 after an appeal
court refused to overturn his conviction on draft evasion charge
Trimm who sought exemption as a conscientious objector, wa
charged with bail jumping when he fled north and he said Ford'
plan leaves too many questions unanswered. "I would have to b
assured, even if I may get amnesty for the initial conviction,
will have immunity from the bail jumping charges," Trim
said.

*Eng and Bus
departmental

Ad majors should consult their respective
offices.

Education ma jors should register in the Ed School Sept.
23.

ery or ortiri grapnics
by CHAGALL, DALI,
VASSARELLY stolen
from
CENTICORE
BOOK SHOP
336 MAYNARD

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How the 81cx
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The 8100X uses a unique sequential
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