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December 05, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-12-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sotturdoy, December 5, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturdoyr December 5, 1970

music-
A summer tradition in winter

.:":By LAURIE HARRIS
I sometimes wonder if peo-
ple know what a benefit con-
cert is. To me, it means per-
forming artists are coming grat-
is (flight and accomodations are
the only things paid for) so
that the proceeds f r o m that
concert may assist some finan-
cially needy organization.
This Sunday seems to be the
day that the benefit concert of
all benefit concerts is going to
hit the Ann Arbor area - the
benefit for the Ann Arbor Blues
Festival. The list of performers
isa pretty formidable one, in-
cluding Junior Wells and Buddy
Guy, Dave Alexander, Otis Rush,
More incredible ARTS, Page 6
Luther Allison and Johnny Win-
ter.
Most of the players are rep-
resentative of the City Blues
out of Chicago. Junior Wells,
who has appeared in both of the
p a s t festivals is a legendary
harmonica player and recently,
he and Buddy Guy, his guitar
player, cut an album with Eric
Clapton as producer.,These two
are the epitome of the Chicago
Blues as it is played today on
the Southside of the city.
D a e Alexander, a piano
player, was so well received this
Spast summer at the festival that
he stuck around town and play-
ed two more gigs. Otis Rush is
probably the greatest living
blues guitar player after B. B.
King today. He has b e en a
mainstay on the West Side of
;Chicago for fifteen years play-
{ing blues, jazz and soul. Besides
being a fine musician, he has
-Daily-David Baker witten .I can't quit you baby,"
records
Ravaging the TVictor Vault'

with a loss of about thirty thou-
sand dollars. And of course, the
late announcement of the seem-
ingly more attractive Goose
Lake Festival drew many ex-
pected attendants from the
Blues Festival to the commer-
cial reknown of Russ Gibbs.
The need for expanded health,
latrine and water facilities cut
into the Blues Festival budget
to the amount of about 25
thousand dollars. And an ex-
orbitant fee was required for
adequate policing of just beyond
the festival grounds-none with-
in.
In this manner mounting fi-
nancial fingers pared away at
the festival's budget . and they
weren't even trying to make
money; they just wanted to
break even.
The Blues Festival will not
repeat next year if the commun-
ity does not support Sunday's
benefit concert. According to
Dan Burke of the Canterbury
House, one of the sponsors, they
do not need to make up all the
deficit. only a large proportion
of it. The rest can be supple-
mented by contributions which
the Blues Festival Committee is
willingly accepting.
Tickets are on sale now at
Discount Records, t h e Union
Lobby and Students Interna-
tional. They range in price from
$3.50 to $5.50 and it seems well
worth it to help support a sum-
mer tradition even though its
winter.

Mondays thru Fridays
4-6:30 p.m.
O GOLDEN HOUR
ALL COCKTAILS 60c
exclusively at the
GOLDE"7N FLO
314 South 4th Ave.
PREVIEW
International Liberation Studies Project
CHINA WEEK Jan. 11-16
Edgar Snow's
The China Story:.
One-Fourth of Humanity
feature-length COLOR documentary
unique footage of the Long March,
the Cultural Revolution
Mao Tse-Tung, Chou En Lai, Lin Piao, Chiang Ching

NATgNALGONERALS
7~9-1$00~
NOW SHOWING
MON.-FRI -7:0O-9:0
SAT,-SUN.
50-7:00-9:00
mover
PANAVISION' Color by DE LUXE
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
MATINEES ONLY
1230 P.M.-3:30 P.m.
All Seats 75c
II
UNITED ARTISTS
PoP;TH PorUM
F~ ITH AVENUE AT Lin~n?
flOWN1'OWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMAION 761-6700
not continuous With 'JOE'

i

"My love will never die," and
"So many roads."
Luther Allison and his blues
band from Peoria, Illinois has
been a local favorite since his
initial appearance here two
summers ago.
His jam with Johnny Winter,
the acclaimed albino blues gui-
tarist from Texas, this pas
summer was one of the hits of
the entire festival and they re-
turn this Sunday with, perhaps,
another collaboration.
Just sit back and think about
it.
It's a bit of everything fiom
this past summer's festival with
the repetition weeded out. Of
course the Events Building isn't
quite an open park, and a star-
lit evening will not be casting
it's natural light over the au-
dience. But in the middle of a
thirty degree week, it doesn't
seem likely that even the most
avid of blues fans would rest
their cushiony bottom on the
now frozen grass of summer.
The Blues Festival is in dire
need of the community's assis-
tance. An average of eight thou-
sand people per day filled the
summer festival's gates and each
paid only ten dollars for three
days filled with incredible mu-
sic. And that ten dollars per
head was not enough to cover
the expenses that magnified
continually through the festi-
val's preparation stages.
Buffetted between the city's
and the University's bureaucrat-
ic annals, the festival ended up

Dec. 4, 5-Friday & Saturday
Henderson Room
227 S. Inga
contribution $1.00

8:00 & 10:00 p.m.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
ills
near Hill Aud.

r

I

HEY YOU

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
a tec by students at the University of
Micnigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daly Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mat
Summer Session published- Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

C?-

By JOHN HARVITH
More champagne for the dis-
criminating classical r e c o r d
collector at cold d u c k prices,
but this time of a different la-
bel and vintage. For this review
inaugurates what promises to be
a most fruitful relationship be-
tween Daily readers and Vic-
trola RCA's budget ($2.93) la-
bel. Victrola, originally famous
(ca. WWI) as the trade name
for the Victor Talking Machine
Company's hand-cranked acous-
tical record-player, n o w is
RCA's prime. outlet for re-re-
leasing historic discs in its fam-
ed "Victor Vault." The Victor
Company had been the m o s t
ambitious and successful clas-
sical recording firm in the U.S.
from about 1903 to 1929, amas-
sing recordings of virtually all
the great singers and instru-
mentalists of that "Golden Age"
in music.
When RCA subsequent ly
boughtout Victor (1929), it ac-
quired legal rights' to the mas-
ters of these recordings a n d
continued to record on its own,
but relied increasinglys on its
European affiliates to supply
the bulk of its catalogue in the
1930's. As a result, most of the
great conductors as well as vo-
calists a n d instrumentalists
then appeared under the aegis
of the domestic RCA Victor la-
bel - Toscanini, Koussevitzky
and Stokowski in domestically
recorded discs; Bruno Walter,
Furtwaengler and Beecham in
European-mastered, domestical-
ly pressed records. By a cruel
twist of corporate fate, many of

t h e best-selling European re-
cordings of t h e 1930's which
first appeared in the U.S. on
RCA Victor, are now capturing
the domestic classical market
on Angel's budget label, Sera-
phim. In a counter-marketing
move, RCA has finally decided
to reissue the legendary Victor
material, as well as its own do-
mestic recordings ca. 1930/55,
which it has kept under lock
and key for the last decade (not
withstanding the fact that a
goodly amount of the old Vic-
tor material had been briefly
offered by RCA in the late '50's
on its now-atrophied ($1.98)
Camden label, and that small
doses had been made available
on its full-priced LM and LCT
series). This has resulted in an
unprecedented flood of reissues
so rich in musical value that
the average collector is left in a
quandary as to what to buy,
while the greedy old record col-
lector (i.e. this reviewer) cries
for more. In the midst of this
perfectly idyllic state of affairs
it is my solemn, delicious duty
as the honest, though admited-
ly biased record reviewer to
make recommendations. T h i s
initial examination of these his-
torical Victrolas, which RCA
dubs "Immortal Performances"
(a foil to Angel's "Great Re-
cordings of the Century") will
limit itself to recent vocal re-
issues.
Galli-Curci: Golden-Age Col-
oratura (VIC-1518) restores to
domestic circulation recordings
hitherto unavailable on LP by
the giant among this century's

coloratura sopranos. Though
slight in physical stature and
build and not possessing a voice
of glass-shattering dimensions,
Galli-Curci towered above her
colleagues by virtue of the per-
fectly controlled vocal techni-
que which she marshalled at
the height of her powers. Her
small voice had clarity and car-
rying power (li k e Bori's and
Schipa's) which maintained its
absolute poise through all the
See IDYLLIC, Page 6

BLACK THEATRE
WHO'S GOT
HIS OWN

YOU GOT BOOKS YOU WANNA SELL? LITTLE EXTRA CASH
WOULD BE SWELL HUNH? WUDDA COINCIDENCE!
WE WANNA BUY.'
THE UNIVERSITY CELLAR STARTS BUYING
BACK BOOKS .
MONDAY, DEC. 7

4
*

Thru Sat.

IN THE UNION BASEMENT

4

-OPEN 12:45-
Shows at 1,3, 5, 7,9 P.M.
A DuNg eus Corner State & Liberty Sts.
You'll Never Forget Program Information 662-6264
, TRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER Presents
A BURT KENNEDY PRODUCTION
"R IDINOV U...
IE GP MGM
PANAVISION'
METROCOLOR
INK SINATRAI
RGE KENNEDY

IL

Held Over Again-6th and Final Week
Starts Wednesday-"The Bird With the Crystal Plummage"

III

U

FISH

FOWn.

& OTHER CREATURES

Im the Joe the whole
country's talking about!

I

a

t

DINE IN or CARRY OUT

ish &chips Lunchcon
Pish & chps bune
TEN PIECES OF FISH, S~ YES S-7
chcken. luncheon
Two PIECES O CbtICIEN.CHIPS
dchckon brnnel
THRIEE PIECES. SLAW. ROLL
$qUia 'S spueab
NINtE ?IECE5 oPcHICIKEN. SE RVtES3-4
buke's &Wjht
F6"rEEN PIECES Of CHICKEN . SERVES 5-7
9 !. "C-gE IEESOF CHICKEN. SERVES 7-9
h tckn w eesribwch

.89
1 s Q

tA TRIUMPHI A RIP-SNORTERI A
'THIS MINUTE' FILM!" -Judith Crist
c 'JOE' MUST SURELY RANK IN IMPACT
WITH 'BONNIE AND CLYDE'I"-Timem agazine
e*** * I LOVE ITI"- Chicago-sun Times
STAUT AND COMPELLING! -washington Post
"WILL BE A BOXOFFICE SENSATION!"
--Chicago Tribune
"AN OCCASION FOR CHEERIN!"
-Philadelphia Daily News
eA MASTERPIECE I-Chicago Today
"CLEARLY THE MOVIE OF THE MOMENT
AND MAYBE THE MOVIE OF THE YEAR!
-Washington Star
BRILLIANTLY DONE,
DEVASTATINGLY FUNNY!"'-New York Daily News

*

I

X79
1.19
25 9
"79

lqq I Mab,

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Sat. 7, 9, 1 1
Sun., Mon.,

Tue. 7, 9

a+

hot hrn cheeSea nbwich . q

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l tog ____________________ I

.

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