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November 24, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-11-24

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November,24, 1974''

P 1eTw.HEMCHGN.AL.TedaNve br 4 I9 Q

dance
From there to here:
Importing local color

.
.. images

NOW SHOWING
Mon.-Fri. 7:00-9:15
St.-Sun. 1 :00-3 :00
5:00-7:00-9:15

By DIANE ELLIOT
The Bayanihan Dance Com-
pany of the Philippines, which
graced the stage of Hill Aud.
Saturday night, is truly a feast
for eye and ear. Now in its
twelfth year, the group comes to
us from its home base, the Bay-
anihan Folk Arts Center in
Manila, under the artistic di-
rection of Lucrecia R. Urtula,
and is currently in the midst of
a fourteen month tour of the
United States and Europe.
Fourteen months is a long
time away from home for the
young members of the company,
most of whom are college stu-
dents or young professionals
and have been involved in folk
dancing since their teens. Just
now they live a rather harried
existence, traveling each day,
performing each n i g h t, then
being whisked off again immed-
iately after the performance to-
ward hotel-room-rest and an-
other audience. But they are
enthusiastic emmissaries of their
nation's diverse and colorful folk
culture, and the smiling assur-
ance and graceful skill with
which they performed dance
after, intricate dande' did not
betray the strain of their hectic
schedule.
In the five dance suites which
comprise an evening's perform-
ance, the company recreates the-
movement and rhythms, songs
and rituals of several of the
many cultures which have flour-
ished in the Islands. "Bayani-
han" means "working together"
in Tagalog, the official language
of the Philippines, and the com-
pany succeeds in weaving di-
verse cultural threads into a
colorful and pleasing fabric.
The Prologue, with its .proces-
sion of gently treading women
and its loin-clothed warrior
6a~ ~ ... .."r .k.:}: r::v:'{ai;;{°::.}::". ...........:"r.3
DAILY OFFI IAL
BULLETIN

chiefs sealing a pact of peace,
set the tone for a performance
which celebrated with equal
verve and skill the customs and
dress of the superstitious na-
tives of the bush, the aristo-
cratic Spanish quarter of old
Manila, the exotic war-like Mus-
lims of Mindanao, and depicted
both ancient tribal mythology
and the present-day good-na-
tured cooperation and festival
spirit of the Filipinos.
Staged with a theatrical so-
phistication w h i c h belied the
ingenuous style of performance,
the dances combined weaving
b o d i e s, songs and rhythmic
accompaniment, brilliant cos-
tumes, swords, fans, parasols-
often with breathtaking effect.
In the first suite, the stage vi-
brated with compelling native
rhythms, accentuated by t h e
resounding smacks of the war-
riors' flat wooden shields, then
quieted to a pulsing murmur for
the serene, gently swaying walk
of the women, bearing tall eb-
ony water jars on their heads.
A skillfully plucked guitar ac-
companied the Spanish-flavored
coquetry of the second suite, the
girls dipping and turning and
playfully kickingdup their flow-
ing trains as smiling young men
vied for their attention. In their
enactment of a Muslim mar-
riage ritual, the m e n flashed
scimitars and whirled to t h e
frenzied beating of the drum,
while the betrothed couple, fac-
es impassive in glittering masks,
struck the ritual postures, play-
ing provocatively w i t h a red.
sash.
The final suite, title "Bayan-
ihan." portrayed t h e carefree
cheerfulness of th e rural is-
landers: a group of leaping boys
saucily rapped out staccato rhy-
thms on polished coconuts
Brook, 'what i sthe Phenomenological
Lagrangian?" P&A Colloq. Rm., 4:15
p.m.
Opera: Puccini's "Madame Butterfly,
Josef Blatt, conductor and Ralph Her-
bert, stage director. Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, 8 p.m.'
General Notices
Scholarships for Study in Germany:
International Center has number of
scholarships available to U-M stu-
dents for study in Germany. General
requirements: 1. Senior or graduate
standing. 2. Good academic record. 3.
Knowledge of German language.
Applications available, at The German
Dept, office, 1076 Frieze; Scholarship
Office, 2011 SAB; and International
Center, Rm. 23, Michigan Union.
For more information, call Williain
LaVine, 765-2137.
a * * *
Student Accounts: Your attention li
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents, Feb. 28, 1936: "Students
shall pay all accounts due the Uni-
versity not later than the last day of
classes of each semester or summer ses-
sion. Student loans which are not paid
or renewed are subject to this regula-
(Continued on Page 8)

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ltUtt,.A ~P

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2x3 ft. Poster (black & wl

ihite)

-Daily-Terry McCarthy

URI, DAVIS
Israeli Pacifist
Political Dissenter
VP, International League
for Rights of Man
SPEAKS ON:
"acifism In Israel"
MON., NOV. 30-8 p"'m.
Natural Science Auditorium
Respondents:
PETER BLOOD, Quaker Peace Work-
er, and another respondent to be
announced

4

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l
: a
,
it

strapped to their chests and
shoulders. The bamboo pole
dances, "Singkil" and "Tinik-
ling," now classics of the com-
pany's repertoire, highlighted
the evening's performance. Nim-
ble dancers calmly picked their
way with ever increasing speed
among the sets of clashing
bamboo poles; in "Singkil" the
girls gestured gracefully with
fans a n d parasols while the
poles beat dangerously beneath
their skipping feet.
The art of the Bayanihan is
one of contrasts, subsuming as
it does the customs of diverse
cultures and interweaving the
masculine with t he feminine,
the lyric with the percussive, the
brash with the subtle. Ameri-
can audiences, accustomed to
the superhuman technical dis-
play of the best of our o w n
0 dance companies or the energy-
packed clowning of a folk bal-
let like the Moiseyev, will find
in the Bayanihan a unique kind
of dance experience. Vital beat
of wooden shields gives way to
the measured regal step of cir-
cling women; these graceful
dancers most delight w i t h a
turn of the head, a flick of the
wrist, a gentle circling of the
hips. Their performance exudes
the simple joy of people cele-
You'll never
go wrong by
buying
so a
art supplies
k AT
- ' f LLETT

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Satudday and Sunday. Items appear
once only. Student organization
notices are not accepted for publi-
cation' For more information, phone
764-9270.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24 I
Day Calendar
Trumpet Student Recital: School off
Music Recital Hall, 12:304 p.m.
Geography Seminar: G. Alexanders-
son, Sch. of Economics, Stockholm,
"Regional Planning in Sweden," 40501
LSA, 4:15 p.m.
Physics Seminar: B. W. Lee, Stony;

brating together, of energy
harnessed within the repetitive
structure of beautifully solemn
ritual. And always the kaleide-
scopic interplay of color in the
array of superb costumes.
But beyond grace and skill,
rhythm and color, it is the ov-
erwhelmingly genuine charm of
this company which makes
them such a delight to watch.
Their consummate graciousness
created a sense of warmth, a
rapport with t h e audience,
whose response was never forc-
ed. When, at the evening's close,
the company sang the Michigan
state song and applauded us, it
was with a sincere warmth and
openness seldom seen in o u r
theaters, where audiences are
habitually attacked, scorned,
milked, and bored.
After the show the dancers
YOUR QUESTiONS ON
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For the student bod
FLARES
by
SLevi
Farah
Wright
Tads
SSebring
State Street at Libe

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137 SPONSORED BY:
DNAMSHALOM HOUSE (Hillel) and GUILD HOUSE
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CITY STATB - 71P-
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Graduates
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_rty.. 4" .

changed and filtered into the
auditorium, still in make-up,
eager to talk to well-wishers and
curious students in a way that
seemed strangely old-fashioned
and American. And then they
were of f, to a hotel and their
next engagement, good will am-
bassadors from halfway across
the world. They perform an-
cient and traditional works in
a refreshing, vital way, reflect-
ing, perhaps, their own youth
and optimism. T h e y certainly
did much to brighten a d r a b
Ann Arbor Saturday with their
own brand of local color.

Send any black
& white or color
photoup to8x10
(no negatives
please) to:W
RONALD JAYE Poster Service
P.O. Box 43
Plainview, N.Y.11803
Enclose cash, check or money
order (no C.O.D.'s) in the amount
of $3.50 for each blow-up.
Original material returned un-
damaged.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Allow 30
days for delivery. Add 45¢ for
oostae & h ni.

#1

ENDING
WEDNESDAY

T

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I

Consider for a moment.
Suppose you were the poorest man
in all America. Without shoes. Ade-
quate clothing or housing. Without
education. Ill fed. Sick. Maligned.
What would you have to be thank-
ful for while most of the rest of

America was sitting down to a fat another gift He's given you. The
turkey dinner? ability to help others. The desire
You would still have the breath to share. To open your heart and
of God in your lungs. your hand and your mind to
You would still have that most someone, somewhere, who just
beautiful gift of all gifts, the might not be quite as lucky
ability to hope. as you are.
You would still pos- Think. If everybody ex-
sess God's love. ercised this wonderful gift,
But very probably, since imagine how much more
you're reading this news- this old world
paper, you're not the poor- would have to
est man in all America.
It's l ikely you have a
television set. be thankful for
A warm bed to on Thanksgiving.
sleep in.
/

A happy feast to share with rela-
tives and friends this Thanksgiving
Day.
In short-lucky you-you do, in-
deed have a lot to thank God for.
And while you're thanking God,
don't forget to thank Him for yet

M9

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'!!Il

ii

I

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